PRESS RELEASE: A January 29 event in keeping with the spirit of MLK

THE ARCHANGEL INSTITUTE MARKS MLK DAY
WITH THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF A COMMUNITY DISCUSSION
HONORING THE SPIRIT OF MLK’s
LETTER FROM A BIRMINGHAM JAIL


The ArchAngel Institute is presenting a community discussion of the Manhattan Declaration in the basement theater of the Allen County Public Library at 3 pm on Saturday, January 29, 2011.

The Manhattan Declaration is a call to “Christian Conscience” that was authored by Catholic and Evangelical scholars. It has been signed by tens of thousands in Christian leadership. It is a pledge to stand firm on the historic Christian teachings regarding the sanctity of human life, the definition of marriage and the free exercise of the Faith. More on this document is available here: http://www.manhattandeclaration.org

A panel experienced in both Christian activism and the discussion of Christian obedience in the face of anti-Christian governance will address the Declaration from differing perspectives. Priests Father David Mary and Father Glenn Kohrman are on this panel, as well as theologian Dr. John Bequette and nurse/pro-life advocate Gloria Carrel.

Former Bishop Dwenger teacher/coach and local businessman Bob Brownis hosting this event for the ArchAngel Institute. This promises to be an interesting and robust conversation of some of the most controversial topics of the day. The panel will take questions from those in attendance.

This event follows the 37th Annual March for Life, which begins with a rally at the Scottish Rite Cathedral at 12 noon on the same day.

Visit the ArchAngel Institute Site

True or False: The U.S. Constitution Defines Blacks As Three-Fifths of a Person?

It’s a tired refrain – the Founders were racists, the Declaration didn’t really mean all men, the Constitution is pro-slavery. It’s also a gross distortion of our history – as King well knew when he invoked the promise that “all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” at the heart of the Founding.

The Constitution, contrary to what the New York Times would have you believe, does not classify people according to race. Free blacks in the North and the South were counted on par with whites for purposes of apportionment. As for enslaved blacks, it was the Southern states that wanted to count them as full persons, thereby inflating pro-slavery representation in the House. The three-fifths compromise was aimed at preventing Southern states from magnifying their own political power by holding slaves.

Yet this myth of a racist Founding has, unfortunately, become deeply entrenched in academia and among the chattering classes. It’s taught in high schools and colleges nationwide and has become unquestionable dogma for many.

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From every mountainside, let freedom ring.


From every mountainside, let freedom ring. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! – Martin Luther King Jr. (I Have a Dream, 1963)

Link

Read more about Martin Luther King, Jr.

Editor’s note to the historically challenged: The famous, martyred U.S. civil rights leader, Martin Luther King Jr. (who we honor today) was named in honor of his father, Martin Luther King (senior) … who was himself named in honor of the 16th century German reformer, Martin Luther … who is known as the “father” of modern Protestant Christianity.

Niece of Martin Luther King Jr. calls for boycott of abortion industry. Gets flack.

“It is absolutely ludicrous that abortion supporters would accuse a blood relative of Dr. King of hijacking the King legacy. Uncle Martin and my father, Rev. A. D. King were blood brothers. How can I hijack something that belongs to me? I am an heir to the King Family legacy,” she said.  “I have a right to stand at the Lincoln Memorial on the 47th Anniversary of my Uncle’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech. The Dream has yet to be realized. That Dream is in my genes and I carry forward in the fight for equality and justice for all blacks, including those in the womb.  My dad and my uncle gave their lives to ensure that the day would come when blacks would be judged not by the color of their skin, but the content of their character. If they were here, I know they would stand with me in this fight for the lives of those most vulnerable among us,” said King.

Other African American leaders are joining Alveda in calling for a boycott of the abortion industry.

“It’s interesting to me to hear so called religious people call us the religious right — but that’s okay because they are obviously the complete opposite… they are the religious wrong!  Which begs the question… what God — if any do they serve?” asked Day Gardner, President of the National Black Pro-Life Union.  “As for me, I serve the God of Abraham, Jacob and Isaac — the great I AM… Father of my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and all things created.  Those of us who serve the one true God acknowledge we are all made in his image. We bow to God’s Word when He says: ‘Blessed is the fruit of the womb.’ If God says children are a reward, a gift and our heritage, then we must uphold that all children are greatly valuable and desirable to God.  So, I ask again… what God do they serve?”

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MLK Day – A day for us to celebrate the ethnic diversity of our Church

Here is why the Church should celebrate this day. A few months ago, a very close friend, who happens to be a priest, was visiting my school in Baltimore. My school is a historically African-American Catholic institution. Just before lunch, I took him into the school’s chapel and pointed out that for many years, the Saint Frances Academy Chapel was one of the few places in Maryland that Black Catholics could attend Mass without sitting in the back or in the balcony. It was one of the only places where they could sit close to the Eucharist during the consecration. This priest is approximately my age and we thanked God that neither of us as African-American Catholics had to ever experience such an indignity.

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