Trending in Britain: Men will completely disappear from the Church by 2028.

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Nor are these trends confined to an increasingly secular and post-Christian Europe. Despite overall church attendance remaining much stronger in the United States, Cardinal Heenan’s predictions have also come true here.

Sixty-one percent of the average American congregation is female and 39 percent male. The gender gap is the same across all age groups and therefore cannot be explained merely by the fact that women live longer than men.

Although research shows that 90 percent of American men believe in God, and five out of six men identify as Christian, only one man out of every six will attend a church in the United States on any given Sunday.

Link

Photo: The Commercial Appeal, Memphis, TN

Video explains host of problems linked with use of chemical contraceptives

Watch the video

Video explains serious problems linked with the use of chemical contraceptives

Watch the video

A reader’s premise: Women are second class citizens in the Catholic Church.

by Doug Lawrence

(This particular commentary is excerpted from a recent Catholic Q&A posed by one of our readers.)

Reader’s Premise: Women are second class citizens in the Catholic Church.

Doug responds:

You have a right to that opinion, but it seems to me that your opinion is based on a popular but erroneous secular humanist/feminist misconception.

The Catholic Church is not a club, not a social group, not a democracy, and certainly not merely an earthly organization. The Catholic Church is the communion of all true believers in Jesus Christ, spanning both Heaven and Earth, whose main purpose is the salvation of souls and the glory of God.

“Fairness” is a matter for divine judgment, as it doesn’t and truly cannot exist in this fallen world.

Our blessed hope is that God will take care of these seeming inequities for us in the next age, when he rights every wrong and makes all things new. In the mean time, we are called to have faith in God and in the only Church that Jesus ever founded, for the purpose of our salvation.

The “door” to the Catholic Church remains the sacrament of baptism, which is open to males and females, alike.

Once baptized, both male and female Catholics, without exception, are adopted children of God, members of the church, living temples of the Holy Spirit, citizens of Heaven, and co-heirs with Jesus Christ.

Catholics of both sexes have equal access to the Mass, the sacraments, and all the other spiritual and substantial resources of the church.

Catholics of both sexes remain children of God’s grace, equal in their God-given spirituality, and equal when it comes to potentially being declared saints of the church.

Catholics of both sexes, by virtue of their baptism, are members of the Royal Priesthood of the Faithful, empowered to approach God personally in prayer, at will, and empowered to share the authentic Catholic faith with any and all who might inquire.

It is only in regard
to the Catholic Ministerial Priesthood
and the Sacrament of Matrimony
where certain distinctions
are necessarily made, as to gender.

It is noteworthy that not just women … but also married men … are typically disqualified from serving in the ministerial priesthood. This would seem to invalidate a very substantial part of the feminist argument.

Meanwhile, the Catholic faith tradition has, as its greatest saint, universal patron, Mother of the Church and Queen of Heaven … the Blessed Virgin Mary … the Holy Mother of God … already truly blessed beyond measure … the authentic, God-ordained role model for every faithful Catholic … regardless of gender.

In light of all this (and more)
it seems to me, the ladies are winning!

May God bless you, shower you with his abundant grace, and lead you to eternal peace and harmony in Jesus Christ, our savior.

Doug

This Week’s Ask Alice: Wearing mantillas (chapel veils) at Mass



Send A Question To Alice

She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Adelaide Asks: Why don’t men wear mantillas (chapel veils) at Latin Mass/Novis Ordo? Why do women wear mantillas?

Alice Answers: Traditionally, men in Western society remove their hats as a sign of respect upon entering a church, classroom, or meeting, and they tip their hats when meeting a lady, or any person in a position of authority.

Latin Masses attendees who wear mantillas in church, cite the words of St. Paul to the Corinthians regarding conduct at public worship:

“Any man who prays or prophesies with his head covered brings shame upon his head. Similarly, any woman who prays or prophesies with her head uncovered brings shame upon her head. For a man ought not to cover his head since he is the image of God and the reflection of His glory. Woman, in turn, is the reflection of man’s glory.” (I Corinthians 11:5, 7)

St. Paul’s remarks concerning head coverings for worship conformed with the dress code of his day. During the 1st Century, A.D., Christian women wore head coverings in public places. Their veils were worn to promote modesty. Head coverings were not mandated for the Christian man’s public apparel in the 1st Century. Women donned veils for cultural reasons, so St. Paul simply adapted their worship wardrobe to their clothing customs.

However, St. Paul gave us flawless fashion advice for being the best-dressed Christians in every century:

“Because your are God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with heartfelt mercy, with kindness, humility, meekness, and patience….Over all these virtues, put on love, which binds the rest together and makes them perfect.” (Colossians 3:12, 14)

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

That which is Veiled is a Holy Vessel

Another “take” on this subject

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

Rep. Allen West to conservative women: We need you to come in and lock shields, and strengthen up the men who are going to the fight for you…

Here’s the statement West made to a group of conservative women that has people on the left riled up:

We need you to come in and lock shields, and strengthen up the men who are going to the fight for you. To let these other women know on the other side — these planned Parenthood women, the Code Pink women, and all of these women that have been neutering American men and bringing us to the point of this incredible weakness — to let them know that we are not going to have our men become subservient. That’s what we need you to do. Because if you don’t, then the debt will continue to grow…deficits will continue to grow.

Read more

Extensive Information about Catholic Religious Orders and Communities


St. Dominic receiving the Rosary
from the Blessed Virgin Mary

In response to a recent inquiry, I decided to post this link to a site dedicated to providing information about the many (and there ARE many) Catholic Religious Orders and Communities.

Don’t miss the related section on vocational books and publications, many of which are available for free.

More information

Thanks to Brian, for the question


8 Tips for Catholic Men

I don’t often write specifically for a male audience, but I believe our gender has some particular and unique challenges to staying on the right path.

I hope to offer some useful insight which will help you, me and other Catholic men be more aware of these self-created challenges and take the necessary steps to overcome them.

Let me start by listing a few general observations about men which may be uncomfortable to read and acknowledge:

We often struggle with humility and let our pride and egos get in the way.

We like to be in control.

We can be stubborn and inflexible to change.

Our identities are often wrapped up in our careers.

We struggle to ask others (especially the Lord) for help.

We are often inclined to action when reflection and discernment are more appropriate.

We are usually uncomfortable with open displays of emotion (ours and others).

We may be overly concerned about the opinions of others (What will our buddies think?)

Read more

Basic Training for Men in the Spiritual Battle – June 26 – Hillside, Illinois

On the Front Lines Flier (PDF)

Submitted by Allen P.

Of Sheep and Men

Sheep are mentioned more than 500 times in Scripture, which is significantly more than any other animal. In both the Old Testament and the New Testament, sheep are the favorite analogy in describing people and their relationship with the Father in heaven. We are sheep. While being sheep of our Lord’s flock is a blessing, it isn’t much of a compliment, I am afraid!

But maybe it is; let’s see and have a closer look.

There are quite some negative traits that can be pointed out about sheep:

    1. Sheep of all domestic animals require the most care and supervision. Left to themselves, sheep have an unlimited capacity for getting into trouble.
    2. Sheep are compelled by mob instinct. Sheep take their queues from each other. If one sheep panics, they all panic. They tend to go with the flow, even if the flow is going in the wrong direction. They have a tendency to wander off. Sheep are forever getting lost.
    3. Sheep are very susceptible to fear. The average sheep is a coward. One loud noise of any kind – it doesn’t have to be the howl of a wolf – sends the flock in every direction. When confronted with danger, sheep panic.
    4. Sheep are very destructive. Sheep have the very bad habit of being very hard on the pasture. When they graze they don’t trim the grass they eat. They bite down and pull up, removing the roots, and not only the stems.
    5. Sheep are very vulnerable to predators. Among animals, sheep are wimps. They are weak, slow, stupid and defenseless.
    6. Sheep have an incredible ability to get dirty. They easily turn every shade of gray and brown imaginable. Sheep get dirty and stay that way until somebody cleans them up.

Whether we like it or not, we are in many ways like sheep.

Read more

Discovering, Accepting and Appreciating that Men and Women are Different

It is true, Original sin has intensified our pain at the experience of these given differences. The Catechism links the tension surrounding these difference to the Fall of Adam and Eve:

[The] union [of husband and wife] has always been threatened by discord, a spirit of domination, infidelity, jealousy, and conflicts that can escalate into hatred and separation. This disorder can manifest itself more or less acutely, and can be more or less overcome according to the circumstances of cultures, eras, and individuals, but it does seem to have a universal character. According to faith the disorder we notice so painfully does not stem from the nature of man and woman, nor from the nature of their relations, but from sin. As a break with God, the first sin had for its first consequence the rupture of the original communion between man and woman. Their relations were distorted by mutual recriminations;their mutual attraction, the Creator’s own gift, changed into a relationship of domination and lust; and the beautiful vocation of man and woman to be fruitful, multiply, and subdue the earth was burdened by the pain of childbirth and the toil of work. Nevertheless, the order of creation persists, though seriously disturbed. To heal the wounds of sin, man and woman need the help of the grace that God in his infinite mercy never refuses them. Without his help man and woman cannot achieve the union of their lives for which God created them “in the beginning.” (CCC #s 1606-1608)

Read the article

Why are so many men pro-life?

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Q: Why are so many men pro-life?

A: Most good men that I know have a natural dislike of dismembering and then plucking helpless infants out of their mother’s womb.

Besides, there’s usually a lot of blood and pain and death, and nobody really likes that either. 

Sometimes the mother is permanently injured, scarred, or dies too, and I’ve heard that something like that can ruin your whole day.

Then there’s the dismal quality of the abortion facilities, along with the unusually poor medical qualifications of the abortionists, who typically can’t get a job anywhere else.

Better to stay the hell away!

Catholic Men’s National Day of Prayer

Catholic Men’sTM National Day of Prayer

by Maurice Blumberg

March 4, 2008

Dear Brothers in Christ,

I wanted to follow-up on my previous Catholic Man Channel article
describing the first Catholic Men’s National Day of Prayer.

Below is a more detailed announcement of this very important event.

The National Fellowship of Catholic Men (NFCM) has sent a letter to all bishops in the
United States asking them to invite Catholic men in their dioceses to participate in the NFCM’s National Day of Prayer, on the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, March 15, 2008.
“We are issuing a call for all men to participate in this national day of prayer,” wrote Kevin Lynch, who is the president of the National Fellowship of Catholic Men. “We are holding St. Joseph up as a model for all men with respect to their manhood, fatherhood, discipleship, work, and roles within their families.”

The National Day of Prayer invites Catholic laymen to attend Mass on March 15 and to pray in the morning and evening.

Suggested activities also include praying the Litany of St. Joseph and the rosary, dedicating one’s work week to the Lord, performing corporal works of mercy, and praying for specific intentions on behalf of their families, their workplaces, the Catholic Church, the United States, and the world.

In the process, the National Fellowship of Catholic Men hopes to energize laymen to deepen their personal conversion to Christ, become better disciples, live out their vocations, strengthen their families, and proclaim Christ in everything they do. According to promotional materials for the Catholic Men’s National Day of Prayer, St. Joseph is an important patron and model for men today, because he is “a perfect example of a fully integrated man.

He represents the saintly integration of faith in both his private and public life. For him, there was no conflict between the sacred roles of believer, spouse, parent and worker.”

The National Fellowship of Catholic Men is working in collaboration with Dan Spencer of the St. Joseph Center for Men of Overland Park, KS.

Spencer initially conceived of a day of prayer by and for Catholic men two years ago, when Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kansas, asked for a month of prayer for priestly vocations.

After meeting with the men he knew and encouraging them to participate, Spencer, who has a long-standing apostolate to men and who oversees the Kansas City chapter of the National Fellowship of Catholic Men, realized how much the men he worked with would benefit from a similar event.

“It just hit me that we could use some prayer for men,” he said.

Spencer began to plan a day of prayer for men with his local diocese.

From the start, though, he also wanted to do something on a national scale to get men to dedicate a day to a single, concrete activity that would improve not only their relationship with God but also their families, workplaces, parishes, and communities.

The only problem, he said, was how.

Last year, he said, the Holy Spirit moved him at the National Fellowship of Catholic Men’s leadership conference in Detroit to consider asking them to be a major partner. After praying about it, Spencer proposed a national event to Kevin Lynch,
co-founder and president of the National Fellowship of Catholic Men, and other leaders.

The idea caught fire.

It was such a natural fit, since the National Fellowship of Catholic Men has grown dramatically in recent years. The NFCM has expanded from just two regional conferences twelve years ago to more than fifty today, and it currently distributes podcasts to over 6,000 men every week.

This year, the NFCM plans to begin a 3-year formation and training program to mobilize and energize men for Christ throughout the country.

More information on the National Fellowship of Catholic Men, as well as the National Day of Prayer, can be found at:

www.catholicmensresources.org

May God richly bless you during this grace-filled season of Lent,

Maurice Blumberg
Executive Director
National Fellowship of Catholic Men

P.S.
I thought you’d like to to see how Mike Anderson, President of the
Kalamazoo Catholic Men’s Fellowship, is promoting the National Catholic
Men’s Day of Prayer in his diocese.

MARCH 15TH – NATIONAL CATHOLIC MEN’S DAY OF PRAYER

Solemnity of Saint Joseph, husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary
All Catholic men in the Kalamazoo diocese are encouraged to come together for Mass at the Saint Augustine Cathedral on Saturday March 15th at 8:45 AM.

The Mass will be followed by a Kalamazoo Catholic Men’s Fellowship breakfast in the Crowley Center, sponsored by the St. Augustine CMF group.

All are welcome! We will be joined by our Bishop James Murray and our CMF Chaplain Father Larry Farrell.

There will be an update on the progress of the national CMF movement and an announcement about the 2009 Kalamazoo Catholic Men’s Conference.

Come join your Catholic brothers for an incredible morning of joy and fellowship. Let’s make this a
major turn out of Catholic men from our diocese.

This article is part of NFCM’s sponsorship of the Catholic Man channel.
Contact NFCM at PO Box 86381, Gaithersburg, MD 20886 or e-mail them at
info@nfcmusa.org.

Submitted by Doria2