They don’t call it “miraculous” for nothin’.

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by Fr. John A. Hardon, S.J.

Among the patients admitted was a boy about nine years old. He had been sled-riding down hill, lost control of the sled and ran into a tree head-on. He fractured his skull and X-rays showed he had suffered severe brain damage.

When I finally got to visit his room at the hospital, he had been in a coma for ten days, no speech, no voluntary movements of the body. His condition was such that the only question was whether he would live. There was no question of recovering from what was diagnosed as permanent and inoperable brain damage.

After blessing the boy and consoling his parents, I was about to leave his hospital room. But then a thought came to me. “That Vincentian priest. He said, ‘The Miraculous Medal works.’ Now this will be a test of its alleged miraculous powers!”

I didn’t have a Miraculous Medal of my own. And everyone I asked at the hospital also did not have one. But I persisted, and finally one of the nursing sisters on night duty found a Miraculous Medal.

What I found out was that you don’t just bless the medal, you have to put it around a person’s neck on a chain or ribbon. So the sister-nurse found a blue ribbon for the medal, which made me feel silly. What was I doing with medals and blue ribbons.

However, I blessed the medal and had the father hold the leaflet for investing a person in the Confraternity of the Miraculous Medal. I proceeded to recite the words of investiture. No sooner did I finish the prayer of enrolling the boy in the Confraternity than he opened his eyes for the first time in two weeks. He saw his mother and said, “Ma, I want some ice cream.” He had been given only intravenous feeding.

Then he proceeded to talk to his father and mother. After a few minutes of stunned silence, a doctor was called. The doctor examined the boy and told the parents they could give him something to eat.

The next day began a series of tests on the boy’s condition. X-rays showed the brain damage was gone.

Then still more tests. After three days, when all examinations showed there was complete restoration to health, the boy was released from the hospital.

This experience so changed my life that I have not been the same since. My faith in God, faith in His power to work miracles, was strengthened beyond description.

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A true story about the Miraculous Medal, a prison apparition and the amazing conversion of lost souls.

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Read the amazing story

Thanks to Marcus Allen Steele

The story behind the Miraculous Medal: “God wishes to charge you with a mission. You will be contradicted, but do not fear; you will have the graces to bear it…”


In 1830, Catherine Labouré was blessed with the apparitions of Mary Immaculate to which we owe the Miraculous Medal, the feast of which is this Saturday.  The first apparition came on the eve of the feast of St. Vincent DePaul, July 19. The mother superior had given each of the novices a piece of cloth from the holy founder’s surplice. Because of her extreme love, Catherine split her piece down the middle, swallowing half and placing the rest in her prayer book. She earnestly prayed to St. Vincent that she might, with her own eyes, see the Mother of God.

And so it happened, as she recounted in her own words: “About half-past eleven, I heard someone call my name. I looked in the direction of the voice and I drew the curtain. I saw a child of four or five years old dressed in white who said to me: ‘Come to the Chapel.  The Blessed Virgin is waiting for you.’ Immediately the thought came to me that I will be heard. The child replied, ‘Be calm, it is half-past eleven, everyone is asleep. Come, I am waiting for you.’ I hurriedly dressed and went to the side of the child. I followed him wherever he went. The lights were lit everywhere.

“When we reached the chapel, the door opened as soon as the child touched it with the tip of his finger. The candles were burning as at Midnight Mass. However, I did not see the Blessed Virgin. The child led me to the sanctuary and I knelt down there. Towards midnight, the child said: ‘Here is the Blessed Virgin.’  I heard a noise like a rustle of a silk dress…a very beautiful lady, in a blaze of glory, sat down in Father’s Director’s chair. The child repeated in a strong voice:  ‘Here is the Blessed Virgin.’ Then I flung myself at her feet on the steps of the altar and put my hands on her knees.

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Taylor Marshall reports on his day in St. Louis, at The Hebrew Catholic Conference

(L to R)
Three very well known Hebrew Catholics,
with friends

First of all, what is a Hebrew Catholic? A Hebrew Catholic simply a Catholic who is ethnically Jewish. There are Italian Catholics, Irish Catholics, Mexican Catholics, Polish Catholics, etc. Yes, there are also Hebrew Catholics. They prefer, I am told, the title “Hebrew” because it distinguishes them from non-Christian “Rabbinical Judaism,” which is not the true “biblical Judaism” of Moses. “Rabbinical Judaism” is not the Old Testament faith completed and crowned by Christ and the Catholic Church, because Rabbinical Judaism formally rejects Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah.

As our Savior said concerning those Jews that rejected Him: “For if you did believe Moses, you would perhaps believe me also: for he wrote of me” (Jn 5:46).

This conference was my first time to meet large numbers of Catholics coming from a Jewish background. It was fantastic. Here were my impressions.

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Get free Catholic stuff from the “Our Lady of Fatima Network”


Request a Rosary, Miraculous Medal, Green or Brown Scapular, Our Lady of Fatima Holy Card. No cost. No obligation. Good quality. Allow about four weeks for delivery.

Click here to visit the site

Why the Miraculous Medal Is So Important to Catholics

Devotion to Our Lady had been deeply eroded by Jansenism, which, although in great decline at the time, was replaced with more radical forms of Revolution, so that devotion to Our Lady left much to be desired. We can say that the Miraculous Medal was the first major step toward the ‘re-Marianization’ of the nineteenth century, preparing the great movement of souls that would culminate with the proclamation of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception.

With the use of the Miraculous Medal, extraordinary graces spread throughout the Church. It became a common custom to wear a Miraculous Medal around one’s neck or to place it on the chest of an impenitent patient while making the novenas and prayers prescribed by Our Lady. It seemed almost certain that the person would convert as a result. Through this devotion, Our Lady began to dispense many other graces to the world.

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Why the sign of Our Lady reigns over Europe

Arsène Heitz, the flag’s designer, acknowledged in a 2008 interview that he derived the design of a circle of 12 golden stars from the Book of Revelation. As Heitz was considering a design to submit for the EU, he was reading the history of the Blessed Virgin’s apparitions in Paris’ Rue du Bac, known today as the Virgin of the Miraculous Medal. In fact, he belonged to the Order of the Miraculous Medal, which would explain his intimate acquaintanceship with the symbol.

Thus the symbol recognised worldwide as to the European Union and of Europe in general even by atheists, secularists and Muslims, is a symbol of the Immaculate Conception herself. It warms the cockles of an old Catholic’s heart. European atheists running around in the streets waving the European Union flag over their heads have no idea, or choose to ignore, the true meaning behind the EU’s symbol. And, they are apparently stuck with it as the design isn’t going to change as long as the European Union exists.

In celebration of the adoption of the symbol the Council of Europe commissioned and installed a magnificent stained-glass window in Strasbourg Cathedral which depicts the Blessed Virgin Mother standing beneath an oversized circle of 12 stars on deep blue field. In addition, the European flag was adopted by the then European Economic Community on December 8 1955, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Coincidence? I think not.

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