Archbishop José Gomez of Los Angeles gets it right

“Two hundred years before any of the Founding Fathers were born, this land’s people were being baptized in the name of Christ,” he continues. “The people of this land were called Christians before they were called Americans. And they were first called this name in the Spanish tongue. Every American today, in some way, owes a spiritual debt to these great Hispanic Catholic missionaries of the 16th and 17th centuries.”

Archbishop Gomez adds:

So why don’t we know their stories? Because history is always told by the “winners.” In America’s case, the winners were the men who fought the American Revolution and established our national government. They handed down an American story, a national narrative that began with them and ignored earlier periods of American history.

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Pope calls on young people to be the “first missionaries”online and among people of their age

The only thing the Pope forgot is … no one has properly catechized the last several generations of Catholics  … so what message will these young evangelists attach to the Gospel of Jesus Christ?

Odds are only about 50 -50 that it will be the authentic Catholic truth.

Between religious eco-paganism, feminism, Obamaism, all the allegedly Catholic heretics and schismatics, as well as the many different  “flavors” of nonsense served up by our current institutions of higher learning (including Catholic ones) anything is possible.

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Archbishop Gomez: America’s story really started with Catholic missionaries.

Archbishop Gomez, who wrote his column from Rome after receiving the pallium from Pope Benedict XVI, said American Catholics need to see that the July 1 memorial of Bl. Junipero Serra and the Fourth of July “belong together.”

“America’s story starts with those Spanish missionaries. Our national character and identity are deeply marked by the Gospel values they brought to this land,” he said, noting the many places named in Spanish for saints, sacraments and other objects of faith.

“The Mass was being celebrated here years before the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution,” he said, deeming this missionary legacy to be part of the identity of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

“California was among the first outposts for the evangelization of America. California must now become a leader in the new evangelization of our country,” the archbishop wrote.

Participants in the new evangelization should bring the signs of God’s love to Los Angeles and to the world. The archbishop cited Bl. Junipero’s comments that Missions will provide this country with “what is most important – the light of the Holy Gospel.”

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