When the ’60s radicals took over the Catholic church

When Pope John XXIII called the Second Vatican Council in l960, almost every bishop in the world was puzzled. Vatican Councils historically are only called when the Church is in some desperate need or is fighting a very serious heresy (a widespread attack on a dogma of faith, i.e., Mary was not the Mother of God).  But this was a time when the Catholic Church seemed to be in her glory.  We had an abundance of priests and nuns.  Seminaries were full. Catholic schools were overflowing.  It was not uncommon that attendance at Mass on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation was standing room only.  Almost every Saturday, there were lines for Confession.

So why call a council?  Pope John was warned by some Bishops that in their midst were some (not many) liberal Bishops who would use the council to “modernize” the Church. Previous Popes, especially Pope St. Pius X, had warned that the Church must never be “modern”. She must be unchangeable because what is modern in 1940 will not be modern in 1960 and what is modern in 1960 will not be modern in 1980. By remaining FOREVER unchangeable, you are always relevant.  Pope John promised it would be a PASTORAL Council and not DOCTRINAL or DOGMATIC so that the Deposit of Faith (our beliefs) and the liturgy of the Mass will not change.  It has been said that before he died, he saw the council change in a direction he was unable to stop and thus welcomed death knowing the council would die with him.  Unfortunately, it was re-opened by Pope Paul VI, his successor, who invited 6 Protestant clergy to act as “observers”.  Behind the scenes, these “observers” were allowed much more input and became unofficial participants.  Thus, the Roman Catholic Mass could become “Protestantized.”  At the end of the council, one of the Protestant ministers is quoted as saying:  “This is the best council the Protestants ever had!”

It is not our intention to give you a step by step history of Vatican II.   However, you should know that when the council closed, the wheels were in motion like a train at full speed.  In the driver’s seat were the “modernist” bishops who’d used the council like a vehicle to take it to their own destination—a more “modern” church, open to innovation, causing weakening of faith and much confusion.  Pope Paul VI seeing the end result of Vatican II said in no uncertain terms: “THE SMOKE OF SATAN HAS ENTERED THE CHURCH!”

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