Islam: Firmly rooted in a twisted version of the Old Testament and the Mosaic Law.

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The teachings of Islam are set forth in the Qur’an (Koran), which is divided into 114 chapters or surahs. These are supplemented by hadith, “sayings,” a record of the actions and utterances of Muhammad, which at first were transmitted by oral tradition and later written down.

The Qur’an and hadith form the basis of the shari’a, the Holy Law, which lies at the foundation of the Islamic state, and which constitutes a rich body of legislation covering all aspects of public and private life.

Less clearly defined is the ijam, which may roughly be described as “consensus” and refers to the common opinion of the believers regarding particular interpretations of Islamic teaching. This in turn is guided by the Sunna, or accepted “tradition.”

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If they had taken out a few red light cameras, instead of blowing up scores of innocent people, they might have been hailed as heroes.

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By Doug Lawrence

Probably the strangest part of the Boston Marathon Bombing Story is the fact that observant Muslims, all around the world, believe that the bombings were the will of Allah.

It was written … so to speak … since if Allah permits it, then it is his will that it should be. That’s what Muslims understand to be true.

The concept is known as “double predestination” … which means that none of us have free will, and all are mere puppets … some destined for eternal hell fire and some destined for the rewards of paradise … acting out the preordained will of a totally irrational, impersonal and unknowable god.

And … according to Mohammed (pbuh) … there’s not one thing anyone can do about it!

There is no personal guilt. There is no personal responsibility for sin. There is only the requirements of Muslim Sharia Law … which itself is a strangely twisted, regional and cultural derivative of the original Hebrew Mosaic Law.

Muslims also typically don’t understand that attempting to live according to Sharia Law is actually a deadly curse, so it’s no surprise that Muslim terrorists tend to do all the wrong things, for all the wrong reasons … since they obviously have things totally bass-ackwards … and their god wants it to be that way.

Kind of makes you wonder who their god really is.

Photo credit: Wikipedia

Topical and Timely New Book – Not Peace but a Sword: The Great Chasm Between Christianity and Islam By Robert Spencer

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Robert Spencer has written a dozen books on Islam, as well as thousands of pages of commentary on Islamic law, scripture, and tradition, but this may be his most significant book yet because of its potential to alert Christians to a dangerous gap in their knowledge of Islam. Christian leaders are badly in need of a wake-up call about Islam and this is a wake-up call that is hard to ignore. Not Peace but a Sword asks questions about the relationship between Christianity and Islam that few others are asking, even though they are questions that beg for answers.

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The Great and Enduring Heresy of Mohammed (Free Selection)

Christian and Muslim values are fundamentally incompatible because, “Their gods do not partake in the same discourse, do not put forward the same values, do not propose for humanity the same destiny, and do not concern themselves with the same manner of political and legal organization in human society.”

Yet, the teachings of Allah, as they were allegedly revealed to Mohammed, are at wide variance with the teachings brought to us by Christ.  The turmoil and division that have characterized the history of Islam, have created tremendous confusion and discord among Islam’s own adherents, and brought violence, destruction, poverty, and denial of freedom wherever the religion has gained dominance.

What is called for, at this moment in history, is not some pointless search for common ground.  Christians and Muslims know that common ground exists.  There are principles we share, and issues of moral concern on which we find ourselves allied (the struggle against abortion, for one).  But, religious peace and human safety are not advanced by the willful blindness that goes by the name of tolerance—by agreeing to disagree.  We must, instead, focus on seeking truth.  I suggest we begin our search by considering the following topics.

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Editor’s note: This is an article that should be read and studied by everyone.

The Crusades: A direct response to Muslim aggression and conquest.

Christians in the eleventh century were not paranoid fanatics. Muslims really were gunning for them. While Muslims can be peaceful, Islam was born in war and grew the same way. From the time of Mohammed, the means of Muslim expansion was always the sword. Muslim thought divides the world into two spheres, the Abode of Islam and the Abode of War. Christianity — and for that matter any other non-Muslim religion — has no abode. Christians and Jews can be tolerated within a Muslim state under Muslim rule. But, in traditional Islam, Christian and Jewish states must be destroyed and their lands conquered. When Mohammed was waging war against Mecca in the seventh century, Christianity was the dominant religion of power and wealth. As the faith of the Roman Empire, it spanned the entire Mediterranean, including the Middle East, where it was born. The Christian world, therefore, was a prime target for the earliest caliphs, and it would remain so for Muslim leaders for the next thousand years.

With enormous energy, the warriors of Islam struck out against the Christians shortly after Mohammed’s death. They were extremely successful. Palestine, Syria, and Egypt — once the most heavily Christian areas in the world — quickly succumbed. By the eighth century, Muslim armies had conquered all of Christian North Africa and Spain. In the eleventh century, the Seljuk Turks conquered Asia Minor (modern Turkey), which had been Christian since the time of St. Paul. The old Roman Empire, known to modern historians as the Byzantine Empire, was reduced to little more than Greece. In desperation, the emperor in Constantinople sent word to the Christians of western Europe asking them to aid their brothers and sisters in the East.

That is what gave birth to the Crusades. They were not the brainchild of an ambitious pope or rapacious knights but a response to more than four centuries of conquests in which Muslims had already captured two-thirds of the old Christian world. At some point, Christianity as a faith and a culture had to defend itself or be subsumed by Islam. The Crusades were that defense.

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Shocking Book and Video: The Truth About Mohammed


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Father John Hardon, S.J.: A Primer On Islam

Doctrine and worship in the Koran

Islam is a glomeration of sects and traditions that bewilder the Western mind. Yet after thirteen centuries, the followers of Mohammed are somehow united and their unity traceable to a common devotion to the Koran. It is the duty of every Moslem, man, woman, or child, to read the Koran and understand it according to his capacity. There runs through the book a consistent body of doctrine and of practical obligations which has remained in all ages the inspiration of the Muslim religion.

Unexpectedly, the famous Shahada or profession of faith, “There is but one God, and Mohammed is the Apostle of God,” nowhere occurs as such in the Koran. The nearest equivalent, often called the Islamic Credo, is found in the surah of Women: “You who believe, believe in God and His apostle, and the Book which He revealed to His apostle, and the Book which he revealed to those before him. Whoever denies God and His angels and His books and His apostle and the day of judgment has strayed far away from the truth.”1

While the Koran itself is central, three other sources of Islamic doctrine and practice are recognized by orthodox Moslems: tradition or Qunnah, community agreement or igmah, and the principle of analogy called gijas.

Tradition as a source of revelation is co-equal with the Koran in binding power and authority. It consists of all the sayings, explicit or implicit, of Mohammed, which he did not personally set down in the Koran.

Consensus of believers is more difficult to define and has occasioned endless dispute and schism. But in theory it means that whenever a sizeable portion of the Moslem faithful agrees on some cardinal issue of doctrine or ritual, this becomes part of the creedal structure of Islam.

The method of analogy finds special application in the field of morals and conduct, where a new situation is evaluated by comparison with a similar one in the past. Understandably the principle of gijas lends itself to arbitrary interpretation and, in fact, has been the cause of grave tension and conflict in Moslem jurisprudence.

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