HSBC Britain gives Vatican and others sixty days to find a new bank

Diplomats in London have been thrown into chaos after Britain’s biggest bank, HSBC, sacked them as customers and gave them 60 days to move their accounts.

Their situation has been made far worse because other banks have been closing ranks and refusing to take their business.

More than 40 embassies, consulates and High Commissions have been affected. Even the Vatican has been given its marching orders.

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Read an article about the Catholic Campaign for Human Development that Yahoo tried to suppress

Originally posted in 2003 – BBO – before Barack Obama 

For thirty years, the bishops have been paying lip-service to the right to life, while putting Catholic money into Alinsky-style organizations like the IAF. They gave IAF a million dollars. They gave a million to ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now) where Hillary Clinton learned her trade.

Joseph Cardinal Bernardin gave a million to the Chicago Metropolitan Sponsors (CMS) (while shutting down parochial schools) so that it could hire IAF to organize United Power for Action and Justice (UPAJ).

When the Cardinal was criticized for giving so much Catholic money to this group, he answered that the money did not really belonging to the Church. Someone gave it to him to fund CMS. No one in authority has yet pointed out that donating money in such a manner constitutes the very essence of money-laundering.

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Barack, the American Pharaoh, targets Vatican City

The American Pharaoh continues his war on the Catholic Church.  The US State Department is now labeling the Vatican City a money laundering risk. They allow Jihadi linked Islamic charities to operate unimpeded, yet they are concerned about Vatican City.

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How the mighty have fallen: Vatican knuckles under to EU banking authority.

VATICAN CITY (RNS) Prosecutors in Rome on Wednesday (June 1) released $33 million (23 million euros) in Vatican funds that had been frozen last September pending an investigation for possible money laundering.

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Visiting the Vatican? Carry no more than $13,999.99 in cash!


VATICAN CITY — The Vatican issued a new rule Friday requiring anyone bringing $14,000 or more into Vatican City to declare it, the latest initiative by the Holy See to come into compliance with international finance norms.

The rule was introduced the same day the Holy See’s broader anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing regulations went into effect, including the creation of a new financial watchdog agency tasked with ensuring transparency in Vatican finances.

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“You see, young man, the age of the Church is past, in which he said, ‘Silver and gold have I none.’ To which Aquinas replied, “True, holy father, but the age is also past, in which he could say to a paralytic, ‘Rise up and walk.'”

Trouble with the Vatican Bank

With the trip to England, the Pope has stepped fully into the papacy. There were no major setbacks and he presented the Church as still the most dignified representative of humanity — and did so in the secular heart of the secular continent (stepping into the belly of the beast, so to speak, and leaving unwounded; indeed, with new and well-deserved respect). Thus far it is the high point of Benedict XVI’s pontificate, coming at a time when Church credibility in Europe is in crisis and to a region that has been of special cause to him. The British media admitted that Pope Benedict “succeeded in presenting himself as a lovable, elderly figure,” as one news service stated. “What the visit accomplished above all was to unify Catholics and humanize a pope who has so often been perceived as cold, aloof and authoritarian,” wrote Catherine Pepinster, editor of a Catholic newspaper called The Tablet.

It was a huge victory, the product of courage, which means it was the product of faith. A Crucifix he held even seemed to radiate. “This was a much more successful visit than the Roman Catholic hierarchy had dared to hope,” said the Daily Mail newspaper. “The crowds were larger than had been forecast, if not as big as they were when the charismatic Pope John Paul II came to this country 28 years ago.” The Sun added: “The pontiff’s visit proved much more substantial than anticipated.”

Upon his return, the Pope was met by what may or may not turn out to be another scandal — an investigation by Italian authorities of the Vatican bank’s chief and the impounding of $30 million of Vatican assets.

It is too early to tell if there is merit to the investigation or whether the Italian authorities and media are playing it up as a little taste of persecution (perhaps the devil’s response to the success in England). The bank chief, Ettore Gotti Edeschi, says it was all caused by an error in procedure: money transfers from one account to another that were not “money-laundering,” which is what authorities ostensibly are guarding against.

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