Mormons, Catholics … what’s the difference?

Mormon

Catholics learn from childhood that God is a Spirit – a being without a material body. In Jesus Christ, He was incarnated as a man. Nevertheless, the human nature of the Son was something that He took on; it was not part of His original nature. The Mormon view of God is vastly different. To begin with, the LDS God looks an awful lot like your neighbor: “The Father has a body of flesh and bones as tangible as man’s; the Son also; but the Holy Ghost has not a body of flesh and bones, but is a personage of Spirit” (Doctrine and Covenants 130:22). Indeed, for the Mormon, God the Father is an exalted man, not an omnipresent Spirit:

“Latter-day Saints perceive the Father as an exalted Man in the most literal, anthropomorphic terms. They do not view the language of Genesis as allegorical; human beings are created in the form and image of a God who has a physical form and image (Genesis 1:26)” (Encyclopedia of Mormonism, “God”). In this way, God has arms, legs, flesh, passions – all things that we, his children, have ourselves.

But wait, there’s more. Not only is Heavenly Father a man, but he lives with his wife on a planet near the star Kolob (Abraham 3:2-3, 16). There, from a distance, he reigns over the earth. To say these beliefs are outside the mainstream of Christianity is like saying Hitler wasn’t a very observant Jew. So divergent is the Mormon theology of God from that of orthodox Christianity, that the two can hardly be said to be related. The controversy over whether or not Mormonism is Christian springs from this fact.

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