Johnny come lately Miami politician attempts to close inner city mission founded by Mother Teresa.

MIAMI | Storm clouds gathered as the City of Miami threatened to close the feeding program that the local Missionaries of Charity had been doing for three decades. But seemingly as fast as it loomed, the storm faded.

The order of sisters, founded by the late Mother Teresa, had been feeding hundreds of the homeless every week for more than three decades. But in late March, the city said the sisters lacked a permit.

This week — after a flurry of newspaper articles and TV news reports — the city backed down.

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Editor’s note: Just another example of government usurping the proper, charitable role of the church … and doing it poorly … at greater cost and with much wasted effort  … for all the wrong reasons.

Interesting facts you probably didn’t know about Mother Teresa

Here’s a quick Blessed Mother Teresa primer, emphasizing the stuff that you probably don’t know, some of which we only learned recently.

1. She was born a rich girl.

Born in 1910, Mother Teresa came from money at least by the standards of her native Skopje, Macedonia. Her parents were so well-off that there was a local saying “as generous as the Bojaxhius.” (Her last name was Bojaxhiu; her given first name was Agnes.)

Agnes was cultured and well-educated: She wrote poetry and played the mandolin. Her family took in orphans and she tagged along as her mother went out to tend to the destitute. All of this challenges the notion of pre-saints as nasty, or no better than average, until God flicks a switch (think Paul, pre-Damascus).

In Agnes’ case, if God flicked a switch, he had clearly laid the circuitry carefully beforehand.

See all 7 …

The little lady had it right!

“I know I wouldn’t be able to work one week if it were not for the continual force coming from Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. In our society we begin our day with Mass and Holy Communion and we end it with one full hour of Adoration. We have permission from the different bishops to expose the Blessed Sacrament. All of us know that unless we believe and can see Jesus in the appearance of bread on the altar, we will not be able to see Him in the distressing disguise of the poor. Therefore, these two loves are but one in Jesus.” (Blessed Teresa of Calcutta)

Source: http://www.integratedcatholiclife.org

Father Leo reminisces: Mother Teresa and the secret of the 10th Memorare.

Mother Teresa sat in the passenger seat, and together we prayed the fifteen decades of the Rosary and a Quick Novena. This Quick Novena was, so to speak, Mother Teresa’s spiritual rapid-fire weapon. It consisted of ten Memorares — not nine, as you might expect from the word novena.

Novenas lasting nine days were quite common among the Congregation of the Missionaries of Charity. But given the host of problems that were brought to Mother Teresa’s attention, not to mention the pace at which she traveled, it was often just not possible to allow nine days for an answer from Celestial Management. And so she invented the Quick Novena.

Here are the words of the Memorare:

“Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to your protection, implored your help, or sought your intercession was left unaided. Inspired with this confidence, I fly unto you, O Virgin of virgins, my Mother. To you I come, before you I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in your clemency hear and answer me. Amen.”

Mother Teresa used this prayer constantly: for petitions for the cure of a sick child, before important discussions or when passports went missing, to request heavenly aid when the fuel supply was running short on a night-time mission and the destination was still far away in the darkness. The Quick Novena had one thing in common with nine-day and even nine-month novenas: confident pleading for heavenly assistance, as the apostles did for nine days in the upper room “with Mary, the mother of Jesus, and the women” (Acts 1:14) while waiting for the promised help from the Holy Spirit.

The reason why Mother Teresa always prayed ten Memorares, though, is as follows:

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Let’s become an army of baby-savers and promote LifeCall.Org

One example of how LifeCall.org is saving lives comes from this past Christmas. An 18-year-old girl’s mother threw her out of the house when she discovered she was pregnant. Forced to sleep on a park bench on a frigid December night, the teen went to the guidance counselor at a local high school the next day and asked if she could use his computer to look for help.

Kathy says, “She found [us] through LifeCall.org. It was an hour-and-a-half drive for us [to pick her up]. Now she’s living with us and her baby is due in the spring…Once that baby is born, her family’s going to want her back. There’s nothing like a baby to heal the wounds.”

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Another fan of the late archbishop Sheen waxes eloquently

I love Mother Teresa, but Archbishop Sheen is one of my greatest heroes–especially when it comes to preaching and evangelizing. He was a master orator who understood rhythm, story, and stage presence better than any Catholic preacher I know. He knew how to connect with people at a deep level and was absolutely magnetic on the stage. When he preached, according to witnesses, you felt like you were listening to one of the apostles.

In my mind, Sheen was the most influential American Catholic of the twentieth century. He was certainly the most renowned evangelist, dominating the airwaves and attracting larger audiences than guys like Milton Berle and Frank Sinatra.

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She was seeking a meaningful life, when she met Mother Teresa…

Conroy said she ministered to babies in an orphanage and to dying adults alongside Mother Teresa 24 hours a day. With Mother Teresa, she prayed and ate, participated in Mass and Holy Hour, and even held her hand. It wasn’t always easy, but it was one of the happiest experiences of Conroy’s life. She tried to absorb all the lessons as she witnessed Mother Teresa’s ideal holiness.

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