Sebelius and her Kansas political “pals” at least partly to blame for death of Tiller

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Kathleen Sebelius, former Governor of Kansas, now Obama Administration cabinet member, is at least partly to blame for the demise of Dr. George Tiller. (Sebelius seen standing between Tiller and his wife.)

Sebelius was Tiller’s biggest fan and his most politically savy enabler, even to the point of throwing lavish parties for the abortionist and his staff, in the Governor’s residence.

If Sebelius had actually engaged with Kansas pro-lifers in the type of dialogue that her boss, Barack Obama, the ABORTION President, claims to so highly recommend,  it’s quite likely that an acceptable compromise could have been worked out that would have both reduced the number of abortions and lowered Tiller’s profile as the country’s leading late term abortionist.

And that, my friends, may have been the difference between life and death … for Tiller … and for many of the thousands of innocent babies that Tiller so wantonly put to death … using many and various methods and means … that are much, much more brutal … to both the mother and the ill-fated child … than any of the alleged acts of torture that were recently carried out by the U.S. government, in defense of our country.

For details, click here.

Anyone want to bet that Sebelius doesn’t even have the “guts” to show up at her pal Tiller’s funeral?

Mr. President, it’s not too late to begin a serious dialog. What are you waiting for?

Mother of nine has no plans on slowing down

Mother of nine has no plans on slowing down

Reporter Progress Newspaper

Downers Grove, IL –

These days, the average American mother has about two children. But Daria Skrzypczynski is not your average mom.

The former Westmont resident who now lives in Downers Grove has not only given birth to and raised nine children, she has also home-schooled all but one.

“Some people think I’m crazy, but now that I have functioning adults, people give me more credibility,” said Daria, whose three boys and six girls range from 3 years to 22 years old .

Click here for the rest of the story …

The bible said to honor thy father and thy mother, but why did Jesus address his mother only as “woman”?

Q: The bible said to honor thy father and thy mother, but why did Jesus address his mother only as “woman”?

A: God said “women” at the Wedding of Cana, and He said “woman” while dying on the cross. The beginning and the end of his of His earthly ministry.

God said “woman” in Genesis 3:15, and He said “woman” in Rev. 12: >> The only two places in scripture where you have a woman and a serpent in the same verse. Genesis and Revelation, the beginning and the end of the Bible.

“Woman” is a two fold title. Culturally, it was an honorary term at that time, not a derogatory one as in 21st white Anglo-Saxon American culture.

There are other biblical references that uses “woman” as they refer to Mary.

Rev 12:15 The serpent poured water like a river out of his mouth after the **woman**, to sweep her away with the flood. 16 But the earth came to the help of the **woman**, and the earth opened its mouth and swallowed the river which the dragon had poured from his mouth.
17 Then the dragon was angry with the **woman**, and went off to make war ON THE REST OF HER OFFSPRING, on those who keep the commandments of God and bear testimony to Jesus. And he stood on the sand of the sea..

Who could these OFFSPRING be? Ever commentator worth his salt will tell you that these offspring are the Church. How did the Blessed Virgin Mom become the Mother of the Church?

John 19:26 When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother, **Woman**, behold thy son! 27 Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home.

The experiences of the “Beloved Disciple” (BD) were the focus of John’s Gospel. He is an ‘everyman’ character. St. John’s Gospel is told in such a way that the reader can identify himself with the BD and is meant to see the story of Jesus from the BD’s perspective. Whatever is addressed to the BD is addressed to the reader.

So we have established that:
1) Mary is the Mother of Jesus
2) Whose children are the Church that keeps the commandments AND honors her Son
3) Who himself explicitly designated her as the Mother of his disciples.

Answer by Peter C – Yahoo Answers

Fr. Tom Euteneuer: Walking with Jesus Christ Through the Week Called Holy.

Fr. Tom Euteneuer: Walking with Jesus Christ Through the Week Called Holy

A short excerpt from Fr. E’s weekly newsletter:

On Holy Thursday two great institutions are commemorated. Let us not overlook Our Lord’s firm desire to establish them as perpetual gifts for us: one is the sacred priesthood and the other is the Eucharist. He said that He “greatly desired” to eat that Passover with His disciples and that is because He wanted to entrust to certain unworthy men the awesome task of handing down the memorial of His inestimable Sacrifice “in remembrance of Him” to the end of time. Will we thank Him from the depths of our hearts this week for the infinite richness of His Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity in the Eucharist and for the blessing of His priest brothers who bring that Gift to us?

As we continue to walk with Him we reach the week’s summit on Friday – Calvary – but we notice that He is now accompanied in His suffering by His Mother. She was not at the Last Supper because She was not given the gift of the priesthood, but She walked with Him to another Altar of Sacrifice and stood there in perfect union with His redemptive suffering. Let us walk with the Mother of Sorrows on this sorrowful day to derive the deepest possible graces from the Cross that She so perfectly shared in. Then, when He is put in the tomb, let us stay by Her side on Holy Saturday, in vigil, contemplating, grieving for the sins that put Him there and waiting in “joyful hope” for the Day that will never end.

Sign Up For the HLI Newsletter here:

A New Catholic Page by Bob Stanley – Motherhood!

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A New Catholic Page by Bob Stanley – Motherhood!

Bob stanley just added another section to The Catholic Treasure Chest Website.

Click here to view it

Why Do Catholics Consider the Virgin Mary To Be An Intercessor?

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Q: Why do Catholics consider the Blessed Virgin Mary to be an intercessor?

Isn’t Mary just a created human person, like all the rest of us? And according to the Bible, isn’t Jesus the ONE intercessor between God and man?

Please explain.

A: Since you mentioned the Bible, crack your Bible open to Genesis 3:15. There you’ll see God’s very first promise to fallen mankind, and there you’ll find the first reference to “the woman” whose “seed” would someday crush the head of the serpent. 

People insist on their own intepretation of things, but one thing is certain … Mary is that “woman” … Mary said “yes” when God sent Gabriel to ask her to be the mother of his divine son … and some 9 months hence … Jesus did indeed emerge from Mary’s blessed womb.

Mary remained Jesus’ mom, and his first, best, and most constant disciple, ever since … and if that’s not a selfless act of intercession on behalf of all mankind (second only to God’s) than I don’t know what is.

Furthermore … anyone who expects Jesus to ignore this fact, and merely “discard” his mother Mary, once she had served her purpose, doesn’t know God! 

But there’s more. Go to the Gospel of Luke, chapter 1, verse 32.

Gabriel explains to Mary precisely WHO her son will be. One of his titles is the eternal King of the Royal House of Israel. And since Mary will ALWAYS be Jesus’ mom, Mary will ALWAYS remain the mother of the King.

According to the practices of the Royal House, first established by King David, later observed and followed by King Solomon, and ratified by God, through the authentic scriptures, the MOTHER of the King is the QUEEN, and the official duty of the Queen of the Royal House is to intercede with the King, on behalf of the people.   

Meet me at the 1st Book of Kings, Chapter 2, beginning with verse 12, for the proof.

Witness a disgruntled and powerless Adonais approaching Bathsheba, the Queen Mother, asking her to intercede for him, with  King Solomon. Then, witness the way the Queen is subsequently received:

The Queen enjoys unrestricted access to the King.

As the Queen approaches, the King sets up a throne for her, at this right hand.

He bows, and gives her his undivided attention. 

Those familiar with the Ten Commandments might recognize this as “Honor your Father and your Mother.”

In verse 24, we see Solomon acting on his mother’s request … but not in the way Adonais had expected. Adonais will be put to death!

There’s nothing in the rules that says the King must grant his mother’s request! 

Catholics rightly understand that these Old Testament events prefigure the grace-filled, New Testament reality.

In the New Testament, Jesus works a miracle at Cana, simply because his mother (the woman) asks, while one of the enduring promises of Christ is that all the faithful will rule and reign with him, in eternity.

It was Jesus who clearly stated that he is the God of the living, and not the dead … and that Abraham was able to “see” his coming, and was glad.

For these and other very good reasons, Catholics believe that the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Queen Mother of the House of Israel, and the mother of Jesus Christ, is also alive and in Heaven, ruling and reigning with Jesus, the Eternal King of the Ages, just as he promised.      

The Fiat, and Mary’s Example of Spiritual Living

The Fiat, and Mary’s Example of Spiritual Living
By Fr. Walter Dziordz, MIC (Dec 7, 2006)

When Gabriel the Archangel tells Our Lady at the Annunciation that by the “power of the Most High,” she is to bear the Son of God and name Him Jesus, Mary surrenders herself completely to the Divine Plan in what is known as the Fiat (Lk 1:38). Fiat means quite simply, “yes.”

Mary’s “yes” leads to the birth of Christianity. Her agreement will touch people’s hearts everywhere. Christians will ponder this encounter. Movies will be made! Other religions will even honor this famous conversation between the Mother of God and the archangel.

I would think that the best way to understand the Blessed Mother’s consent to the Divine Plan of Redemption is to let her teach us how to understand it.

On a basic level, her “yes” serves as an invitation for us to also trust in God and to experience God in deeper ways. Her “yes” is an act of mercy not only because by giving birth to Christ she helped secure a means for our salvation, but also through her example, we learn to draw closer to God.

Before Mary came along, so many people must have felt distant from God. Maybe they wished to draw closer to Him but did not really know how. Perhaps they felt as if they weren’t being “fed” spiritually. This is a common phrase these days, to be “fed.” It’s a good one, and right now I would say that by reflecting on the encounter of the Blessed Mother and the archangel, many people have been “fed” over the centuries and are still being fed by it today.

How so? Because when we hear the Word proclaimed, we can look to Mary and learn from her to keep it and ponder it in our hearts as she did (see Lk 2:19). Out of love for her Father, she welcomed the Word even when she didn’t fully understand it.

After all, the Blessed Mother never claims in Scripture to know it all – that she has it all figured out and that any of her experiences with God can be understood right off the bat. Throughout the Gospels, she continually “ponders all these things in her heart.” She sits on them. She wonders about it all, whatever “it” is in terms of her encounter with God.

Her legacy to us is multi-layered. She gives us her experiences with salvation history, along with her method of processing these experiences. That is to say, she pondered the Word in her heart, so that like a seed it would bear fruit in due time (see Mk 4:20).

As our own Mother, she is teaching us how to live as spiritual adults, in the same way our own earthly mothers would teach us how to live as future earthly adults. The stories of her life have been repeated continually over the centuries precisely so that we can strive to live virtuously to ponder the mysteries of faith in our own hearts.

The Blessed Mother is leaving us an example of how to walk the life of the spirit. She is our model, par excellence, of love, trust, and service. She was the first to believe and the first to be redeemed as the preeminent member of the Church.

And, she teaches us to be thankful to God, even when we don’t always understand His ways. With Mary, that is evidenced by the fact that soon after she says “yes,” she visits her cousin Elizabeth and proclaims what we know now as the “Magnificat,” a wonderful prayer of thanks to God for the wonderful things that He has done for her, which include, most of all, the impending birth to our Savior. Yes, there is some understanding on her part already that is both real and deep. But she is still stepping forward to an unknown future out of trust in God.

Trust, of course, is the very foundation of the message of Divine Mercy. The more we trust in Him, the more He pours His graces out for us. Yet, how many of us truly trust with all our hearts? I see many people who tend to honor some aspect of Church teachings while ignoring others that they don’t completely comprehend. For example, the Church teaches us to confess both sins of commission (what we did that was sinful) and sins of omission (the good things we could have done but didn’t). Isn’t it true that most of us tend to only admit to the former?

As for Mary’s Fiat, we honor this particular experience of hers, listen to priests’ sermons on it, watch this or that TV show or movie, and so on. How many of us take the time to so realize the importance of this occasion that we sit down someplace and ponder it in our own hearts, as Mary did – and often? I believe that by embracing the whole of Church teachings we find true understanding, peace, and the joy of the Christian message. And this is mercy – to open our hands and to receive all of the good gifts that the Lord offers to us.

The Fiat? We know what we already know about it. What we still need to come to terms with, however, is that it is a mystery. But it’s not the kind of mystery that pushes us away (as in “who can comprehend a mystery?”). It’s a Sacred Mystery that is calling out for us all the time, but especially now on Dec. 8, on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, indeed throughout the whole of Advent, culminating on Christmas Day.

All of our liturgical seasons exist for a reason. These “days” are living events. In addition to “celebrating” them, we are called to ponder them, to allow them to take root. We are called to move more deeply into that truth where Mary and the saints live all the time, waiting for us to join them.

Divine Mercy Sunday is the first Sunday after Easter. To learn more about it, and about the Marians of The Immaculate Conception, click the links:

http://www.thedivinemercy.org/

http://www.marian.org/index.php

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