True confessions: Why I never should have had eight children.

When I was a happy mother of four, seriously considering and deeply desiring another child, an odd feeling overcame me. Over several days, my excitement at the idea of a new little soul became mixed with feelings of discouragement and fear. It began to dawn on me that I was barely good enough “mommy material” for the four treasures I already had, and that any further parenting would be irresponsible. It came to a head one evening: I remember standing in my kitchen, full of fear and anxiety, telling myself that I had no business — no business! — having another baby. Not now, not ever.

All my shortcomings and sins came to the forefront of my mind, and I stood there reeling from the truth of it…

List of shortcomings and conclusion

The extreme relevancy of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Mother of Mothers

Turning to Mary as a young mom gave me a front-row seat to what it meant to live one’s life for the sake of another: To pour your love into your family and the community around you—yes, to “mother” it. And that was a totally counter-cultural idea, and it grew on me. Or, rather, I grew into it. Having previously thought such nurturing activity would be an unfulfilling and unprofitable step away from all I had worked to achieve, I learned a new and more vital calculus from Jesus through Mary: real love is true when it is given with no guarantee of a return.

Far from being old-fashioned, Mary complements our modern idea of strong womanhood. Mary is, indeed, strong. She conversed with an angel, and submitted her life totally to God. She faced public disgrace and her beloved Joseph’s quandary regarding a possible divorce. Mary gave birth in a place not conducive to comfort. She left her country, living as a refugee in Egypt; she stood by friends in need; she was a young widow. She walked the road to Calvary with her Son and stood beneath his cross. She mentored the Apostles in the ways of the Spirit at Pentecost. She embraced heaven.

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Traditional comments and famous quotes on Motherhood

Every man for the sake of the great blessed Mother in Heaven, and for the love of his own little mother on earth, should handle all womankind gently, and hold them in all Honor. – Alfred Lord Tennyson

A mother is the truest friend we have, when trials, heavy and sudden, fall upon us; when adversity takes the place of prosperity; when friends who rejoice with us in our sunshine, desert us when troubles thicken around us, still will she cling to us, and endeavor by her kind precepts and counsels to dissipate the clouds of darkness, and cause peace to return to our hearts. – Washington Irving

I feel that, in the heavens above, the angels, whispering to one another, can find, among their burning terms of love, none so devotional as that of mother. – Edgar Allan Poe

A mother is one to whom you hurry when you are troubled. – Emily Dickinson

submitted by Doria2

Deconstructing the Essential Father


Marxist feminists and others have seized upon this notion of male domination and concluded that all men oppose women.  They then urge the “deconstruction” and “deculturation” of fatherhood in the interest of producing a genderless society in which there can be no possibility of male oppression.  Such a revolution, however, if it could be brought about, would mean the end of both fatherhood and motherhood.  What these revolutionaries fail to understand is that fatherhood is of indispensable significance and should not be rejected and replaced, but redeemed and restored.

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Seen on the web: Old guard feminists reject motherhood, promote killing of “intrusive” babies.

The old guard feminists who insisted that women’s success in the public sphere could only be accomplished by rejecting the “strait-jacket” of motherhood (and killing any intrusive babies) have been roundly displaced by another group of women who say that it’s challenging but possible to juggle it all without murder.

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“Systematic, repetitive acts of infanticide.”

Atrocious crimes feature so often in the daily news that they begin to lose their power to shock, but the trial of an Australian woman makes a chilling exception. According to the prosecutor, water polo champion Keli Lane was so determined to be selected for the 2000 Sydney Olympics that she “hid” a pregnancy from everyone and, when her daughter was born, she killed her, buried her, and then went to a wedding.

That was in 1996 when Lane was 21. As a result of various sexual relationships she had already had two abortions and — in moments of better judgement — had two babies adopted out. After each birth she would immediately resume her active sporting, social and sex life. She drank heavily and “kept up with the boys”. She was not, as it happens, selected for the Olympic team.

Now 35, Lane denies killing her child and claims that her then boyfriend took the infant away. Maybe. Hopefully. Because it is very hard to accept that a mother would kill her infant with the cold-blooded casualness the prosecution alleges. And yet, only two weeks ago we heard about a French woman, Dominique Cottrez, who admitted suffocating eight of her newborns and concealing their corpses in the garden and garage of her home. Among similar horror stories in recent years was that of Susan F, a German woman who, over a period of six years, killed three of her newborns and hid them around the house.

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They’re never going to understand this, on the coast(s): Feminine beauty was created for ‘spousal love’.


In modern society, woman “is presented either without sexual attributes or as a sex object,” the professor lamented. “How is it even possible to address a culture that treats the feminine body in this way?”

However, “John Paul II does not hesitate to rise to the challenge,” she wrote.

“When John Paul II links the visible bodily aspect of a woman with its power of perennial attraction ‘in strict accordance with motherhood,’ he may seem to be limiting the often wondrous visible beauty of woman to one dimension.”

Yet, “the mystery of femininity manifests and reveals itself in its full depth through motherhood,” Shivanandan said, quoting the late Pontiff.

“This mystery, as he explains in his Apostolic Letter Mulieris Dignitatem, involves ‘a special openness to the new person’ on the part of woman through which she discovers her own identity precisely as woman.”

In this gift of self through the openness of bringing new life into the world, a woman not only realizes her identity as female, but reaches the fullest expression of what feminine beauty is, explained Shivanandan.

“Beauty, feminine beauty, which, as John Paul II says, is in strict accordance with motherhood, is both a source and fruit of spousal love lived sacramentally in the family,” she noted. “From it radiates the beauty of the civilization of love.”

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