A mere fifty or sixty years ago I doubt you’d find any practicing Catholic who would say they supported gay ‘marriage’.

People are getting weary of fighting immorality on all levels because what is and isn’t moral has been warped.  Things aren’t always so black and white anymore.  Where black and white once held the bounds of moral and immoral firmly in place, they have now given way to shades of grey.

What God determined as immoral, has been redefined. Lust has become love. Marriage between a man and a woman as God defined it, as been redefined by mere man.

When lust was redefined as “love” people forgot when REAL LOVE meant.
Today’s “love” is a rip off.  A counterfeit of what real love is.

So women read “romance” novels and sigh over what they see as romantic love. While men read porn magazines and lust after the very thing that will lead them to Hell.

We are being desensitized and most of us don’t even know it.

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RIP: Annette Funicello, Catholic

…I’m a Catholic, and I’ve always been a religious person, and having MS reminds me that there’s a higher power up there who knows what HE’s doing. MS has brought my family closer together, if that’s possible.

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Why is moral causality so repugnant to Hollywood?


Warning! This article deals with movies and adult sexual matters.

And why is moral causality so repugnant to Hollywood? Because it is the only thing that allows people to make sense out of their lives. Hollywood is in the business of control through entertainment. Morality is the opposite of that. It is autonomy through restraint.

Hollywood’s main weapon against moral causality is pornography in its various forms because passion short-circuits reason and provides the simplest form of control. But their lust to dominate goes beyond that. The thread that leads Theseus out of the labyrinth of his own passion is practical reason, which is another word for morality. Syphilis was a moral tale that got decertified in two different ways in two different movies. Which shows how important it is to those who are willing to wreck their stories and lose Oscars by not mentioning it.

At this point, it might be appropriate to mention successful cures, not to syphilis but to what causes syphilis, namely, movies. The antidote to Hollywood used to be known as the pledge, not the Alcohol pledge (although it was similar) but the Legion of Decency pledge not to see obscene movies.

The Legion of Decency Pledge was the teeth in the production code. I’ve written about its demise in John Cardinal Krol and the Cultural Revolution. The pledge is based on the premise of moral causality, the one premise which Hollywood goes out of its way to deny, even if it means wrecking perfectly good stories that could earn lots of money.

As Larry Dickson has pointed out, an oath is the only thing that most people have. The only oath of any significance left in our culture is the marriage vow, which is undermined by Hollywood because Hollywood wants to weaken and control people by robbing their lives of moral significance.

The pledge is the one thing Hollywood feared in the past, and it is something they can learn to fear again. The details still need to be worked out, but a pledge of total abstinence when it comes to television might be a good place to start.CW

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Vampire Logic – by Rev. Thomas J. Euteneuer

With the issuing of the third movie in the Twilight series I have to speak out about our culture’s twisted fascination with vampires. I don’t hesitate to tell people that I am totally disgusted with the new fad sweeping over our youth culture these days. It is not just kids that are taken up with the wiles of the dark world either: many moms of teens are swooning for them too. I think that these seductive creatures are simply the spawn of the Harry Potter culture that has for over a decade now been indoctrinating kids to think that the occult world is normal and that all this evil messaging is harmless when dressed up as entertainment. That’s vampire logic – and just what the devil wants us to think.

Gone are the days of Bella Lugosi’s Dracula (1931) where good was good and evil was evil. A crucifix would drive Dracula away and then he had to go into his infernal coffin when the first streaks of dawn appeared. He was in every way presented as a creature of evil, dark of heart and dread to encounter. He drank human blood too, a feature that was supposed to strike terror in every person who valued his life’s essence. The image of a blood-sucking creature who lives in slime and darkness and will pounce on you to drain out your very essence should terrorize every decent person. This is because vampires used to be images of demons. That’s what demons are all about: the vanquishing of all human decency and life. They represent the spiritual vortexes of the demon world that drag down to the depths of hell all who fall prey to their wiles.

But, my, how vampires have come up in the world these days.

Nowadays vampires are divided into good and bad – no longer intrinsically evil. The good ones rescue vulnerable women instead of biting them and, allegedly, drink only animal blood (well, we haven’t seen the last Twilight movie yet…). And crucifixes? Don’t think you’ll see any of those driving away bad guys in these movies. The heroes are the “good” vampires, not the Church or religious faith in Christ.

These super-star vampires also walk around in sunlight and, as a matter of fact, their skin just happens to glisten like diamonds when exposed to direct sunlight. Isn’t that wonderful? The glam vamps are gentlemen, chaste and well-intentioned, yet they are always hovering around the edge of “falling” and in seductive situations which cause young people to think that they are capable, like their hero vampire, Edward Cullen, of going just so far and pulling back, out of self-control. That’s teaching them to play with fire, not a real chastity message for kids.

The worst part of this fascination with vampires from a faith point of view, however, is its blasphemy of the Eucharist. “Unless you eat my flesh and drink my blood you have no life in you,” said our Blessed Lord in Chapter 6 of John’s Gospel. He is the One who offers His flesh and blood for the life of the world. The vampires eat (bite) the flesh and drink the blood of victims rather than give their own to redeem others. Their bites corrupt and transform their victims into vampires like themselves. They have no life in them. They are the “living dead” by their own estimate.

How sad that this generation has been so taken in by those who represent the very antithesis of the core reality of our Faith – the Eucharist. Vampire logic is anti-Eucharistic logic, and it’s very dangerous for our kids. In their obsessive fascination with such darkness, kids (and adults) turn their backs on the One who actually died for them.

To those who say, “Oh, Father, it’s only harmless entertainment,” I say simply: You’ve been warned.

Sincerely,

Rev. Thomas J. Euteneuer,

President, Human Life International

List of the Ten Best American Catholic Movies (Plus Fifty More)

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There are Catholic films being made today – notably by the indefatigable Leonardo Defilippis – but mostly straight-to-video hagiography.

In the Forties, however, Catholic movies hit the big screen and the Big Time and marked a turning point in American culture.

Catholics were no longer simply marginalized immigrants; they became mainstream American icons.

No two films prove the point more surely than Leo McCarey’s Going My Way (1944) and its sequel The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945), which received ten and eight Academy Award nominations respectively, made Bing Crosby (as Father O’Malley) the nation’s top box-office star, and gave the luminous Ingrid Bergman (in Bells) her third consecutive Best Actress nomination.

Although the sequel is probably more watched today, Going My Way was more honored at the time: McCarey and Crosby won Oscars and GMW was the top-grossing picture of the year. Bells topped the box office too, but GMW is by far the more poignant film – bittersweet really – in its depiction of the joys and sorrows of the priesthood. If the movie’s final scene doesn’t move you, better check for a heartbeat.

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Plus Fifty More

For the men

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Life, Liberty and the Relentless Pursuit of… Pleasure

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By Nicoletta MacKenzie

When my siblings and I were young, we had no TV; my folks did not take us to the movies, and we loved spending time at home and with our young cousins. Were we rich or poor? We did not know nor did we ever think about it: The words meant absolutely nothing to us. We never went hungry or homeless. Our best times were spent on vacation, in grandpa’s cabin in the Alps, where walking through the woods every day to the spring, to get drinking and cooking water was a adventure, and taking a bath on the terrace, in a tub of water that had been warmed by the sun was fun. We shared the “laundry facility” (two huge, connecting outdoor tubs, fed by another spring), with the village’s milk cows, taking care that the tub with the suds was clean and filled with fresh water by dusk, when the cows returned from their pasture to drink, before heading to their stables to be milked. Grandpa told us old stories, mom and dad loved us. When the pantry was low, before payday, mom improvised. Ever had “hot homemade chocolate pudding” for dinner? Yum! No radio, no refrigerator, one naked light-bulb hanging from the middle of every ceiling, and a fireplace to keep us warm in the evenings. Now, that’s happiness!

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