The Nativity of Christ: Its Historic Reality

shepherdschristmas

The fact is that after centuries of trying to cast doubt on the reality of Christ’s Incarnation into this world, we must say that all the evidence, when carefully examined, indicates that Christ lived in a definite time and place. He was who he said he was. No other explanation suffices to account for the evidence. The effort to show that Christ was unreal or something else has failed.

Read more

How Christ was (miraculously) born of the Virgin Mary


The Savior, rather, passed through the womb of the virgin Mary without causing any damage whatsoever. Indeed, as he passed through the closed walls of the room after his Resurrection (without breaking the walls themselves), so too did he pass through the closed wall of our Lady’s virginity (without causing any rupture or break).

This is the constant teaching of the Fathers of the Church and of the Popes and Councils. Indeed, it is worth noting that the Apostles’ Creed specifically names the virginity of Mary in relation to the birth of our Savior: “Born of the Virgin Mary”.

By his power as God, the Savior passed through the closed womb of the Virgin Mary as light passing through glass, as thought proceeding from intellect. He did no harm to the physical integrity of our Lady’s virginal cloister, but rather consecrated it!

It is this reality, that Jesus came forth from the womb of Mary without rupturing her virginity, which is the miracle of the birth of Christ. Pope Pius XII (in 1943) refers to this miracle in the encyclical Mystici Corporis, paragraph 110.

If Jesus was born according to the ordinary mode, then we may wonder what exactly is the “mystery” of the third joyful mystery?! But Jesus was not born in the ordinary way, rather he was born in a marvelous and miraculous manner – for he passed through the walled enclosure of his Mother’s virginity causing neither rupture nor pain unto the Virgin.

Read more

ONE SOLITARY LIFE

He was born in an obscure village, the child of

a peasant woman. He grew up in another village,

where He worked in a carpenter shop until He was

thirty. Then for three years He was an itinerant

preacher. He never wrote a book. He never held

an office. He never had a family or owned a home.

He didn’t go to college. He never visited a big city.

He never traveled 200 miles from the place where

he was born. He did none of the things that usually

accompany greatness. He had no credentials but

Himself. He was only thirty-three when the tide of

public opinion turned against Him. His friends ran

away. One of them denied Him. He was turned over

to His enemies and went through the mockery of a

trial. He was nailed to a cross between two thieves.

While he was dying. . . His executioners gambled

for His garments; the only property He had on earth.

When he was dead, He was laid in a borrowed grave

through the piety of a friend. Nineteen centuries have

come and gone, and today He is the central figure of

the human race. All the armies that ever marched, all

the navies that ever sailed, all the parliaments that ever

sat, all the kings that ever reigned, put together, have

not affected the life of man on this earth as much as

that. . . . . . .

ONE SOLITARY LIFE

The above is Doria2’s favorite Christmas greeting of all time, and he wishes all his friends around the globe a Merry Christmas,  full of love … and a Happy, Healthy, Holy New Year.

Are you a Mary, a Joseph, a Wise Man, or a Shepherd?

Let’s try to recapture the riches of this lost worldview by applying the spiritual sense of the Christmas story to our lives. For that story happens not only once, in history, but also many times in each individual’s soul. Christ comes to the world — but He also comes to each of us. Advent happens over and over again.

There are two ways to connecting the historical and the spiritual senses. The Jesuit method, from St. Ignatius’ “Spiritual Exercises,” tells us to imaginatively place ourselves into the Gospel stories. The older Augustinian method tells us to look for elements of the story in our lives. We shall be using this latter method as we survey the scene in Bethlehem for the next four weeks.

Look at your Nativity set. Around the Christ Child you see four people or groups: Mary, Joseph, the wise men and the shepherds. We are all around the Christ Child, defined by our relationship to Him; we are all Marys, Josephs, wise men or shepherds.

Read more of the article by Peter Kreeft