Catholic doctor explains importance of having babies God’s way vs man’s way

Dr. Anthony J. Caruso is a Chicago-area Catholic physician who has an ambitious and praiseworthy plan: to establish the St. Anne Center for Reproductive Health, whose mission “is to promote the health and well-being of the local population by providing accessible, high-quality medical care for people of all ages, following the model set forth by the Magisterium of the Catholic Church.”

Dr. Caruso writes:

“I am a board certified Reproductive Endocrinologist who practiced in the [in vitro fertilization] world for 15 years. After seeing the damage that these treatments were causing couples and the complete commodification of life, fueled by a deeper understanding of my Roman Catholic faith, I left the field in 2010. I am currently praying for an end to the culture of death, and hoping to one day have the funding to open the St. Anne Center for Reproductive Heath, to provide options for people with challenges to conceive with support and care to follow God’s will.”

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NFP is not Catholic birth control. It’s the Catholic world view…lived out in the bedroom.

With a difficult and commitment heavy process, success and satisfaction depend on actually learning to embrace the process itself, not just the goals. The people I know who look seriously fit are not the ones who hate exercising and eating well, but like to look good and so struggle through. Almost no one is able to put that much consistent effort into something he doesn’t actually want to do. Success in that area comes from finding an athletic activity one can like and working up to the point where one actually wants to engage in it. That doesn’t mean it isn’t hard. But it’s something hard that you want to do.

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Writer likes new Natural Family Planning App


-It achieves the golden standard of NFP charting: It gets my husband involved (because it’s his iPod!). I think the digital format would make NFP more appealing, or at least more accessible, to many men.

-The info can’t get lost. Even if my husband’s iPod gets broken or stolen, my records are stored online.

-It’s not idiot-proof, but close. I make observations every day, but only record them every three days or so. The pre-set calendar makes my mistakes obvious and easy to fix.

This app allows Billings users to share charts directly with their teachers. I wish the Creighton folks would get back to this app’s designer about developing a Creighton app, because while I can use this app for my own purposes, I can’t share charts with my practitioner.

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Natural Family Planning


Helping couples to deepen conjugal love and achieve responsible parenthood is part of the Church’s total pastoral ministry to Catholic spouses. Fulfillment of this ministry includes both education and pastoral care.

This means “instilling conviction and offering practical help to those who wish to live out their parenthood in a truly responsible way” (Familiaris consortio, #35).

Natural Family Planning (NFP)

NFP is an umbrella term for certain methods used to achieve and avoid pregnancies. These methods are based on observation of the naturally occurring signs and symptoms of the fertile and infertile phases of a woman’s menstrual cycle. Couples using NFP to avoid pregnancy abstain from intercourse and genital contact during the fertile phase of the woman’s cycle. No drugs, devices, or surgical procedures are used to avoid pregnancy.

NFP reflects the dignity of the human person within the context of marriage and family life, promotes openness to life, and recognizes the value of the child. By respecting the love-giving and life-giving natures of marriage, NFP can enrich the bond between husband and wife.

Click here to view the official USCCB NFP site

Couple to Couple League

Billings Life – Billings Ovulation Method

Creighton Model FertilityCare System

NFP and More Site

NFP Outreach

NFPI Natural Family Planning International

FREE NFP Tracking Software for your Palm Pilot

Northwest Family Services

Family of the Americas

Theology of the Body Site

Catholic Man Explains Why Using Artificial Birth Control is Bad for Marriage

The clash over contraception in the final analysis involves two irreconcilable views of the human person and sexuality. Humans are not brute animals; we are created in the image of God. We do not reproduce, we procreate; and the place to look for an ethics of sexuality is not in the rest of the animal kingdom, but in the other direction, at the three persons of the Holy Trinity in the act of eternal, mutual self-giving. The entire Christian world once understood this, and Protestants who think that this is no longer an issue ought to examine their own heritage. Luther and Calvin both taught that artificial birth control is intrinsically evil. So did Karl Barth, who wrote Paul VI a warm letter of praise after the publication of Humanae Vitae. The modern world has evacuated the marital act of its mystery and sanctity and it is sad that most denominations have gone along, hesitantly at first, only to proceed enthusiastically.

Much of the official Catholic apparatus also goes flopping along with the contraceptive culture. Many pre-cana programs actually promote artificial birth control, which means that they indirectly promote abortion. The pope, as usual, has a deeper insight than his middle management into the centrality of contraception in the array of life issues. In Evangelium Vitae, the first institutional step he proposes in the battle against the culture of death is the establishment of teaching centers for natural methods of regulating fertility. Unfortunately, the laity get little encouragement in this area. This is partly because the progressive wing of the Church, which controls most of the chanceries and seminaries, has never focused on Natural Family Planning. They consider it part of the baggage of Humanae Vitae, a document they shun like a vampire avoids sunlight.

Contraception (artificial birth control) at it’s core, is due to a lack of faith in divine providence.

by Matt C. Abbott

The (im)morality of contraception is something the majority of Christians are either uncomfortable discussing or, in some cases, simply not interested in addressing. But they should be, especially if they’re truly invested in building a culture of life.

It’s easy for an assenting Catholic like myself — despite the widespread dissent among Catholics on this issue — to harp on the intrinsic immorality of contraception and its inseparable connection to abortion. So I was pleasantly surprised to see that an Evangelical Christian, Bryan C. Hodge, has given the issue serious treatment in his book…

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Health care: an alternative to ‘no’

By Matt C. Abbott

John F. Kippley, Catholic author and co-founder of Natural Family Planning International, Inc., offered the following commentary on the current health care debate.

In favor of a Personal Responsibility Insurance Act

By John F. Kippley

It certainly seems like a good idea to me that everyone should have access to health care via insurance, that health insurance should be portable, and that the wide community should share the costs of catastrophic diseases and injuries. These are the points on which the topic of health care reform solicits great sympathy on the part of many Americans. There are, however, five huge problems.

1. First, there is the role of government and the danger of another unsustainable entitlement program.

2. Second is the cost of such reforms.

3. Third is greed on the part of more than a few physicians who have learned how to milk the system to the max.

4. The fourth problem is that in all of the many words I have read about the reform of health care and insurance, I have seen nothing about reducing the cost of health care by reducing the items paid for by insurance. For example, I have seen arguments that abortion should not be paid for by insurance that is paid for by taxpayers or even by others in the same insurance plan who are opposed to this grave moral evil. But it also should not be paid for by taxpayers or by group insurance simply because it is a purely elective item. Even the pro-abortionists like to talk about it as a “choice.” The same holds true for birth control devices and drugs. These are strictly matters of choice. They are entirely different from a disease caused by uninvited bacteria or injuries caused by an accident. There is no reason why the body politic or the members of a group insurance should be paying for these matter-of-choice items.

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