An American Nun Responds To Vatican Criticism

On abortion

“I think the criticism of what we’re not talking about seems to me to be unfair. Because [Women] Religious have clearly given our lives to supporting life, to supporting the dignity of human persons. Our works are very much pro-life.

(Ed: Except when you actively condone and promote the destruction of unborn babies, which is what many of these “sisters” are known to do.)

We would question, however, any policy that is more pro-fetus than actually pro-life. If the rights of the unborn trump all of the rights of all of those who are already born, that is a distortion, too if there’s such an emphasis on that.

(Ed: The only other way to do this is to support abortion on demand. And that is what many of these “sisters” are all about.)

However, we have sisters who work in right-to-life issues. We also have many, many ministries that support life. We dedicate to our lives to those on the margins of society, many of whom are considered throwaway people: the impaired, the chronically mentally ill, the elderly, the incarcerated, to the people on death row.

(Ed: What she’s saying is that it’s OK to kill babies if you do other good work. Barack Obama and Planned Parenthood wholeheartedly agree!)

We have strongly spoken out against the death penalty, against war, hunger. All of those are right-to-life issues. There’s so much being said about abortion that is often phrased in such extreme and such polarizing terms that to choose not to enter into a debate that is so widely covered by other sectors of the Catholic Church and we have been giving voice to other issues that are less covered but are equally as important.

“Our concern is that right-to-life issues be seen across a whole spectrum and are not narrowly defined. … To single out one right-to-life issue and to say that that’s the only issue that defines Catholic identity, I think, is really a distortion.”

(Ed: There are no issues that are “equally as important” as the wanton destruction of human life in the womb. The old “Seamless Garment” strategy was a shabby political construct of the 1970’s and 80’s. It is no better, and equally disingenuous today!)

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Editor’s note: The carefully crafted liberal doublespeak employed by this woman is blatantly obvious, as are the motives of NPR. Let’s be honest: the policies and practices of the LCWR are much more in keeping with the Socialist Democratic Party of the United States than the Roman Catholic Church.

NPR should change its name to NPLR (National Public Leftist Radio)

Juan Williams put it simply: “I was fired for telling the truth.” That’s about as succinct a summary of the situation as you’re likely to find. NPR CEO Vivian Schiller terminated Williams’ contract because he veered off of the leftist reservation, and to make things even worse from Shiller’s point of view, he did it on Fox. If Williams is one of the tens of millions of Americans who gets nervous when he’s around people dressed in Muslim garb, NPR believes that he ought not mention it, or – as Schiller said – he should discuss his problems with “his psychiatrist or his publicist.” Schiller would eventually apologize for that demeaning insult, but it’s far too late for NPR to recover from this fiasco. Liberals, conservatives and even some Muslim groups expressed shock and disgust over this assault on free speech and open discussion.

Williams’ sin, according to NPR, was that expressing his personal feelings violated NPR’s code of conduct that forbids their on-air talent from taking a position on “controversial issues,” from participating “…in shows that encourage punditry and speculation rather than fact-based analysis” and from expressing opinions on other shows that “…they would not air in their role as an NPR journalist.” At least that’s the official version, as expressed in an internal memo that Schiller wrote explaining her decision. One suspects that the Council on American Islamic Relations had something to do with it as well. CAIR was outraged by Williams’ remarks. In a statement, CAIR said that “NPR should address the fact that one of its news analysts seems to believe that all airline passengers who are perceived to be Muslim can legitimately be viewed as security threats.”

Well, yeah. Political correctness may demand that we subject 80 year-old Swedish grandmothers to the same level of scrutiny at the airport that we do to young Muslim males, but we know – beyond doubt – which demographic represents a potential threat and which does not. Tarek Fatah, founder of the Muslim Canadian Congress, acknowledged this basic truth, pointing to the fact that most victims of Islamic terrorism are Muslims and that even a Muslim woman wearing a burka is a potential threat. “We are victims of these guys. A number of suicide bombers who have attacked have killed people [while] wearing the burka,” Fatah said. “This is the truth, we should be speaking the truth rather than what people expect us to say.” Yet, NPR cut Juan Williams loose for expressing his personal opinion, and – worse – for expressing a personal opinion that is entirely reasonable and rests on a solid foundation of fact.

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