Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Tulsa is getting national attention for its rejection of government funding.

In nearly all of the 180 Catholic Charities organizations nationwide, one in each of the nation’s Catholic dioceses, most of the budget comes from government contracts, often as much as 80 percent, Sartorius said.

And that can create problems.

In Massachusetts and some other states, for example, local Catholic Charities have shut down their adoption and foster care programs rather than submit to new government requirements that they place children with same-sex couples, which violates the Catholic Church’s position on homosexuality.

Tulsa Catholic Charities is not at risk of that because it does not receive government money to run its adoption and foster care programs, Sartorius said.

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Surprise! There are at least seventeen instances of Sharia law being applied in eleven states.

Most notably, a NJ court held that a man did not commit rape because according to his belief in Sharia law, a man cannot rape his wife, since the wife serves him. So Sharia law was applied to the mental state element of the crime of rape. An American court actually adopted this barbaric reasoning:

[The defendant] was operating under his belief that it is, as the husband, his desire to have sex when and whether he wanted to, was something that was consistent with his practices and it was something that was not prohibited.
The resulting ruling was that a man was held not responsible for rape, where he would have been convicted without Sharia.
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Oklahoma legislators overide governor’s veto to pass two pro-life bills

Oklahoma City, OK (LifeNews.com) — The Oklahoma Senate today joined the state House in overriding vetoes by Governor Brad Henry of two pro-life bills that would help limit abortions. One measure allows women a chance to see a pre-abortion ultrasound of their unborn child while the other prevents wrongful death lawsuits.

The Republican-controlled Senate voted 36-12 Tuesday to override the Henry veto of a bill allowing women to see an ultrasound before having an abortion — which helps as many as 80 percent of women choose life.

The Senate voted on the same bipartisan margin to override Henry on a second bill that respects babies with disabilities by disallowing wrongful-life lawsuits that claim a baby would have been better off being aborted and that a physician should have suggested an abortion.

Both override votes received just enough votes, 36, to obtain the supermajority threshold necessary to overcome the governor’s vetoes. As a result of the votes, both pieces of legislation will now become law.

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