Seen on the web: An old joke.

Beefy Levinson (paraphrased)

An old joke from Latin America:

What happened when the Church opted for the poor?

The poor opted for the Pentecostals.

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Pope Francis violates his own standards, by enumerating his Twitter followers.

“Dear Followers I understand there are now over 10 million of you!” the pontiff wrote on his nine accounts, which publish simultaneously in languages including Latin, Polish and Arabic. “I thank you with all my heart and ask you to continue praying for me.”

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Editor’s note: Rampant Pelagianism has evidently penetrated to the highest level of the Catholic Church.

Related link: Pope Francis “dissing” Catholic group that prayed 3,525 rosaries on his behalf – merely for mentioning the number of rosaries that were prayed!

Pope Francis appears to be worried about the wrong things

lefebvre-mss

Is Pope Francis afraid of Cardinal Lefebre’s ghost?

The Pope expressed his respect for a mission his predecessors has entrusted to a religious family with which there had been differences in the past. These differences came up in Francis’ speech to members of the Latin American Episcopal Council (CELAM), during their meeting at the Centre for Studies at Sumaré, in Rio de Janeiro last July.

In his message, the Pope spoke about the ideological temptation of Christians he described as “Pelagianism”, which apparently manifests itself in the idea of “restorationism”. “In dealing with the Church’s problems, a purely disciplinary solution is sought, through the restoration of outdated manners and forms which, even on the cultural level, are no longer meaningful,” he added.

Bergoglio warned bishops: “In Latin America it is usually to be found in small groups, in some new religious congregations, in (exaggerated) tendencies to doctrinal or disciplinary “safety”.”

The Pope was not hesitant in admitting that this current scared him, particularly as representatives of the Incarnate Word consider the Church to be a disaster.

In an off-the-cuff comment, Francis added: “In the first year of Benedict XVI’s pontificate I had to personally intervene in a case involving the founder of a movement who was linked to this apocalyptic viewpoint.”

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Editor’s note: Pope Francis seems to be a bit too old to be afraid of imaginary bogeymen. Maybe he needs to change hotel rooms.

He ought to be afraid of radical theologians and heretical priests and bishops. But no – only traditional Catholics pose any real threat to the rapidly fading and hugely scandalous post-Vatican II revolution.

As for exaggerated tendencies – how about that “New Springtime” we Catholics have been hearing about, for the last fifty years? No sign of that yet!

Perhaps the pope’s definition of the word “disaster” is different than what’s commonly accepted. In that case, I wish he would provide specifics.

This is getting very old!

photo: www.cfnews.org

I’m taking the weekend off from blogging to attend the first annual “Who Am I To Judge” weekend retreat for Triumphal Catholic Pelagianists

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I’ll be back on Tuesday and let you know how everything went – assuming our white, 1984 Renault – the official car of the event – doesn’t break down!

I would mention that a plenary indulgence is typically available for attending multi-day retreats like this one (assuming no attachment to sin is present) but I’ve been advised that the status of such things may currently be under political review. Besides, nobody is certain anymore, what actually constitutes an  “attachment to sin” – but I’m pretty sure it has something to do with either Pelagianism, Triumphalism, or having a penchant for driving around in run-down old cars.

Don’t forget to go to Mass on Sunday, unless you think that might be a bit too traditional.

Let your conscience be your guide – and have a great weekend!

Doug

Catholic priest seems to have a better understanding of “Pelagianism” than Pope Francis

This heretical, erroneous way of thinking and acting was countered heavily by the Doctor of Grace, St. Augustine, as well as many others like St. Jerome and ultimately condemned as heretical by several Popes and Councils, most notably the Papal approved Council of Carthage (418).

This Council taught authoritatively what we still profess today, namely: (i) Death did not come to Adam from a physical necessity, but through sin. (ii) New-born children must be baptized on account of original sin. [Note that the current Code of Canon Law emphasizes this must be done within a couple of weeks of birth]. (iii) Sanctifying grace not only avails for the forgiveness of past sins, but also gives assistance for the avoidance of future sins. (iv) The grace of Christ not only discloses the knowledge of God’s commandments, but also imparts strength to will and execute them. (v) Without God’s grace it is not merely more difficult, but absolutely impossible to perform good works. (vi) Not out of humility, but in truth must we confess ourselves to be sinners… (cf. Dz. nos. 101-8).

This is all very interesting in light of what has been transpiring over the last half century or so. In fact, having made this little study, it is amazing to see how much Pelagianism has returned in our own day.

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It’s fair to ask what esteem Pope Francis holds the centuries long Tradition of the Church.

Pelagianism has been a much used word in Catholic circles of late.  Which is a surprising, because as a formal heresy, it was fairly well stamped out  1500 years ago or so. Arianism actually persisted longer than Pelagianism.

Certainly, the Holy Father seems much enamored of the word.  He used it a couple of weeks ago to describe traditionalists to some visitors from S. America. He just used it again yesterday, when he went a bit further:

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