Writer’s Conclusion: A Significant Number of Pro-Aborts are Psychopaths


In light of the clinical definition of a psychopath, and the historic manifestations of “psychopathic” movements, it is difficult to avoid the comparison between psychopathy and the perspective that is openly expressed by many leaders in the global pro-abortion movement.

Florence Thomas is only one example of the troubled thinking that seems to characterize pro-abortion leaders.  Her comparison of her own unborn child to a “tumor,” that is, a diseased piece of tissue, is not only unscientific; it suggests a mind that is unwilling, or perhaps unable, to transcend itself and empathize with the humanity of another.  Her claim that a fetus is only human if it is desired by its parents is almost a caricature of ego-centrism, implying that one’s personal wishes confer dignity and rights on other people. The conclusion of Thomas flows inevitably from her premises; she believes that women should be free to kill their unborn children for any reason, in order to preserve their “freedom.”

Thomas’ thinking is echoed throughout the anti-life and anti-family movements of our age. Margaret Sanger, the founder of the modern birth control movement, spoke with the chilling rhetoric of eugenics when she dismissed children who are “unwanted” by their parents, referring to them as “human waste” in her 1920 work, “Women and the New Race.”

“Each and every unwanted child is likely to be in some way a social liability. It is only the wanted child who is likely to be a social asset,” wrote Sanger, who also asked, “Can the children of these unfortunate mothers be other than a burden to society—a burden which reflects itself in innumerable phases of cost, crime and general social detriment?”  In another chapter she infamously states that “the most merciful thing that the large family does to one of its infant members is to kill it.”

The famous Princeton “bioethicist” Peter Singer applies the same fundamental principle embraced by Thomas, Sanger, and others, but takes it to a more explicit conclusion.  Singer acknowledges that unborn children are human beings, but openly denies that they have a right to life, unless their parents want them. Moreover, Singer extends this reasoning to infants after birth as well, offering a moral endorsement of infanticide.

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Revolt against God leads to strange and terrifying changes to society

It is becoming ever more evident that the greatest crisis in Western societies today is a crisis of religious and moral perceptions. In his highly acclaimed essay Revolt Against God: America’s Spiritual Despair, William Bennett argued that by most measures of civilised morality the United States had become an increasingly decadent society. He stated that the only way out of the moral and cultural quagmire was through a return to religion which would provide the basis for a rediscovery of virtue and moral vision. Bennett noted that social regression and exploding rates of crime in the United States were accompanied by “a disturbing reluctance in our time to talk seriously about matters spiritual and religious.” He added that perhaps all of this had something “to do with the modern sensibility’s profound discomfort with the language and the commandments of God.”

The moral failings of the West stem from a runaway pluralism which sees practically all beliefs and lifestyles as possessing equal moral value. Despite the many enigmas that punctuate its history, Western civilisation thrived on a consensus based on the Judeo-Christian vision whereby the vocation of the human person was seen as a call to freedom understood as the ability to carry out one’s duty towards God and neighbour.

The shape of the Western world today has been heavily influenced by certain intellectual currents which have sought to liberate human consciousness from all dependence upon God. In this setting, the human person is no longer recognised as a being made in the image and likeness of God, but is instead reduced to the status of an educated ape. In consequence of this reductionism, it is asserted that there is no created human nature that bespeaks an objective and universal moral law. As Solzhenitsyn pointed out in his famous Harvard address in 1978, it was this rebellion against God and the moral law that lay at the heart of the oppressive ideologies of recent centuries such as secular liberalism, communism and national socialism. Common to these ideologies is the belief that one can be good and virtuous without God.

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