Pope Francis delivers “Urbi et Orbi” Apostolic Blessing to the whole world.

From the Catholic Encyclopedia

The term Urbi et Orbi (which means “for the city and for the world”) signifies that a papal document (or blessing)  is addressed not only to the City of Rome but to the entire Catholic world.

This phrase is applied especially to the solemn blessing with plenary indulgence which, before the occupation of Rome, the pope was accustomed to impart on certain occasions from the balcony of the chief basilicas of the city. This blessing was given annually at St. Peter’s on Holy ThursdayEaster, and the feast of Sts. Peter andPaul; at St. John Lateran on the Ascension; at St. Mary Major on the Assumption. It was imparted also on extraordinary occasions, as at St. Peter’s when the pope was crowned, at St. John’s when he was enthroned, at various times during the holy year, or jubilee, for the benefit of pilgrims.

The blessing Urbi et Orbi of Ascension Day was sometimes postponed till Pentecost on account of the inclemency of the weather, illness of the pope, etc. Innocent X in the jubilee of 1650 on the Ephiphany, Pentecost, and All Saints, as well as later popes, including Pope Pius IX, for special reasons, gave this solemn blessing from the balcony of the Quirinal Palace.

“It’s like a Vatican II bizarro world.” – writer doesn’t think much of Divine Mercy devotions.

by Doug Lawrence

Many traditionalists identify Divine Mercy Sunday as the premier feast day of the liberal, modernist wing of the post-Vatican II Catholic Church, complete with it’s own severely “protestantized” characterization of Jesus Christ.

Isn’t divine mercy what Jesus, the Catholic Church, the Mass and the Sacraments have always been about … offering the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ up to God the Father, for the sins of the whole world … all around the globe … 24/7 and 365 … for the last 2000 years, and counting?

Neither is “Jesus, I trust in you.” exactly new or original. Faith is a cardinal virtue, propagated by God’s superabundant grace, and as such, that disposition should already be  present in virtually every Christian, everywhere.

Still and all, Divine Mercy Sunday offers us the opportunity to obtain an extra plenary indulgence, and in terms of the Easter Season, it also serves as a form of mystagogia (a directed attempt at grasping the Mystery of God) in the hope of gaining a better personal understanding and appreciation of such things … which is never a bad idea.

You’ll find me at my local parish this Sunday, in the school gym, showing the film, “Time for Mercy”. If things go according to plan I might be able to attend the holy hour devotions, and maybe even get to confession.

In keeping with the spirit of the day, I’ll leave the details up to Jesus … since … as a matter of fact … like Saint Faustina … I really do trust in him.

Here’s a link to the article

What do you think about all this? Your comments are always welcome.

About the movie (from Amazon.com) Learn of the startling revelations of Jesus Christ to a young Polish nun in the heart of Poland and the incredible message of Mercy given to her for the world.

In this film, you will hear amazing testimony, witness remarkable footage, and ultimately be challenged to decide how important these divine revelations are for you and the world. Don’t miss why this moment, unlike any other moment in history, is the Time for Mercy.

Second Sunday of Easter, Divine Mercy Sunday

divinemercyenh1

With provident pastoral sensitivity and in order to impress deeply on the souls of the faithful these precepts and teachings of the Christian faith, the Supreme Pontiff, John Paul II, moved by the consideration of the Father of Mercy, has willed that the Second Sunday of Easter be dedicated to recalling with special devotion these gifts of grace and gave this Sunday the name, “Divine Mercy Sunday” (Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Decree Misericors et miserator, 5 May 2000).

The Gospel of the Second Sunday of Easter narrates the wonderful things Christ the Lord accomplished on the day of the Resurrection during his first public appearance: “On the evening of that day, the first day of the week, the doors being shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said to them, ‘Peace be with you’. When he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples were glad to see the Lord. Jesus said to them again, ‘Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you’. And then he breathed on them, and said to them, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained'” (Jn 20,19-23).
                

Plenary Indulgence
To ensure that the faithful would observe this day with intense devotion, the Supreme Pontiff himself established that this Sunday be enriched by a plenary indulgence, as will be explained below, so that the faithful might receive in great abundance the gift of the consolation of the Holy Spirit. In this way, they can foster a growing love for God and for their neighbour, and after they have obtained God’s pardon, they in turn might be persuaded to show a prompt pardon to their brothers and sisters.
                   
Pardon of others who sin against us
Thus the faithful will more closely conform to the spirit of the Gospel, receiving in their hearts the renewal that the Second Vatican Council explained and introduced: “Mindful of the words of the Lord: ‘By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another’ (Jn 13,35), Christians can yearn for nothing more ardently than to serve the men of this age with an ever growing generosity and success…. It is the Father’s will that we should recognize Christ our brother in the persons of all men and love them with an effective love, in word and in deed (Pastoral Constitution, Gaudium et spes, n. 93).
                      
Three conditions for the plenary indulgence
And so the Supreme Pontiff, motivated by an ardent desire to foster in Christians this devotion to Divine Mercy as much as possible in the hope of offering great spiritual fruit to the faithful, in the Audience granted on 13 June 2002, to those Responsible for the Apostolic Penitentiary, granted the following Indulgences:

A plenary indulgence, granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honour of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!”);
                            

A partial indulgence for those who cannot go to church or the seriously ill, granted to the faithful who, at least with a contrite heart, pray to the merciful Lord Jesus a legitimately approved invocation.In addition, sailors working on the vast expanse of the sea; the countless brothers and sisters, whom the disasters of war, political events, local violence and other such causes have been driven out of their homeland; the sick and those who nurse them, and all who for a just cause cannot leave their homes or who carry out an activity for the community which cannot be postponed, may obtain a plenary indulgence on Divine Mercy Sunday, if totally detesting any sin, as has been said before, and with the intention of fulfilling as soon as possible the three usual conditions, will recite the Our Father and the Creed before a devout image of Our Merciful Lord Jesus and, in addition, pray a devout invocation to the Merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you).

If it is impossible that people do even this, on the same day they may obtain the Plenary Indulgence if with a spiritual intention they are united with those carrying out the prescribed practice for obtaining the Indulgence in the usual way and offer to the Merciful Lord a prayer and the sufferings of their illness and the difficulties of their lives, with the resolution to accomplish as soon as possible the three conditions prescribed to obtain the plenary indulgence.

Click to read the complete text courtesy of EWTN

Click to read the Diary of St. Faustina

Click here for The Divine Mercy Novena