Father John Corapi reported to be re-establishing his spiritual life as a Catholic priest

Corapi

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What Pope Francis never told you: Present-Day Judaism is not Old Testament Judaism

destrjerusalem

General Titus’ Siege of Jerusalem – Pentecost Sunday, 70 A.D.

“What The Jews Believe” is the subject to which “Life” magazine devoted eleven pages of its September 11th issue. The writer, Rabbi Philip S. Bernstein of Rochester, N. Y., is the president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, “the largest organization of rabbis in the world.” The article enforces the conviction that the Judaism of today is not Old Testament Judaism.

The two opening sentences alone of the lengthy article warrant the above declaration, viz:—“The Jew has no single organized church. He has no priests.” This is enlarged upon in these words:—“The congregation’s rabbi is a teacher, not a priest.” The rabbi is “without any vested ecclesiastical authority, he is not even necessary to the functioning of the synagogue. Any male Jew with sufficient knowledge of the prayers and the laws can conduct a religious service, officiate at marriages and bury the dead.”

This is not new in Jewry. Ludwig Lewisohn, professor of English literature at Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass., says in his “Mid-Channel”:—“With the destruction of the Temple the sacrificial cult of the Jews was destroyed. For among the people there was but one altar, hence the Jewish people were suddenly laicized. Priests and sacrifices and tangible mysteries were no more.”

Surely this is not Old Testament Judaism, which was, as the Catholic Church is, an authoritative God-instituted priestly religion; the high priest being the supreme ecclesiastical authority. Aaron was its Peter, who was ordained by God through his brother Moses (Exodus 28), having successors until about the time of the destruction of the Temple in the year 70 A. D.

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Richmond, Virginia: The largest contingent of Catholic seminarians in decades

In all, 22 seminarians – including eight from Hampton Roads – are preparing to take the vows of ordination in the diocese, according to church officials. That’s the largest contingent in decades and a huge increase since 1997, when just three candidates were in training.

To the Rev. Michael Boehling, who oversees clerical vocations for the diocese, it is “a promising sign that bodes well for the future.” While a nationwide priest shortage that began in the 1960s shows no sign of ending, he said, “the Lord continues to call young men to serve the church” in Virginia.

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Sally Quinn, Gary Wills and the Washington Post: Looking for God’s truth in all the wrong places.

BSMeter2

Garry Wills, a devout Catholic and religion scholar, in his new book, “Why Priests? A Failed Tradition” argues that as we have seen in Vatican II, the church can and does change. And it should if it wants to stay relevant.

Wills’s book takes the reader back to Christ’s time and walks through the creation of the church.

Priests, he points out, were man-made, not prescribed by God. There were no priests in the New Testament and certainly no one held the title “pope.” (Many Christians agree, see: the Protestant Reformation.) The idea of priestly celibacy is relatively new, too, as is the sacrament of confession. Wills points out that even the central facet of the Mass, a belief that an ordained priest can literally turn bread and wine into Christ’s body and blood, is not universally held.

Link

Editor’s note: “Devout” Catholics don’t deny historically proven, fundamental truths of the Catholic faith, based merely on semantics.

As for priests: God had long ago instituted the Old Testament priesthood through Moses’ brother Aaron, which  served as a prophetic “type” of the coming New Testament priesthood, in virtually every respect.

The key differences between the new and the old was emphasis on grace, rather than law … and on the perfect, divinely acceptable, salvific sacrifice of Jesus Christ … rather than the purely ceremonial sacrifices of dumb animals, which never saved a soul.

As for the Catholic ministerial priesthood, we have Christ, our Heavenly High Priest, at the Last Supper, in anticipation of his saving death on the cross, giving us his body and blood as the definitive sacrifice of the New Covenant, personally instructing the men he had earlier hand-picked and personally trained, to “Do this in remembrance of me.”

As both the High Priest and the Perfect Sacrifice of the New Covenant, Jesus succintly fulfilled the Old Law, superseding and transcending the old Temple Worship System through the institution of an all new, grace empowered, divinely salvific system that would endure until the end of time.

That new “system” shortly became known as the Catholic Church, the supreme arbiter of the New Covenant, which came into existence on the first Christian Pentecost, powerfully and divinely constituted, courtesy of the Holy Spirit.

The primary definition of the Catholic ministerial priesthood is to offer sacrifice to God, for the people, so that they might receive and retain the divine grace that is essential for their salvation.

From the earliest days of the Church, the Mass and the sacraments have always been known as the primary channels of God’s saving grace, while popes, bishops and priests (perhaps not then described in those particular terms) had already been charged by Jesus Christ to be, according to his grace, the primary teachers, governors and sanctifiers of the faithful.

The factual existence of a “High Priest” in Christ Jesus would in itself indicate the presence of a priesthood of a lower stature. And that is true, indeed. We have both the Catholic Ministerial Priesthood and the Royal Priesthood of all believers. Complementary yet different, in their particular missions … but all led by Jesus Christ and all nourished by his body, blood, soul and divinity … in the Holy Eucharist.

Since the word “catholic” means “universal” … Mr. Will’s comment about the true nature of the Catholic priesthood and the Eucharistic sacrifice is imprecise,  at best. But according to the definitive and holy words of Jesus Christ, the divine founder and head of the Catholic Church … Wills is totally wrong.

This is what happens when someone shows up thousands of years after the fact and then tries to reinterpret multiple generations of divine providence, in direct opposition to the Catholic Church. 

In their Bibles, Protestants like to mistranslate the word “priest” as “elder”. But that … other than being dishonest … is just more semantics. 

As for the sacrament of penance … the very first act of the risen Christ was to personally empower the apostles to forgive sins, in his name. While the specific form and rubrics have evolved somewhat through the years, the essential process, purpose and spiritual benefits of the sacrament of reconciliation have never changed.

Ms. Quinn and Mr. Wills … this is all in the Bible, clearly understandable in the light of Christ, according to authentic Catholic Tradition, as well as history. I suggest you look it up!

E. J. Dionne is obviously drunk on heterodox feminist “kool aid”.

In giving up the papacy, Pope Benedict XVI was brave and bold. He did the unexpected for the good of the Catholic Church. And when it selects a new pope next month, the College of Cardinals should be equally brave and bold. It is time to elect a nun as the next pontiff.

Now, I know this hope of mine is the longest of long shots. I have great faith in the Holy Spirit to move papal conclaves, but I would concede that I may be running ahead of the Spirit on this one. Women, after all, are not yet able to become priests, and it is unlikely that traditionalists in the church will suddenly upend the all-male, celibate priesthood, let alone name a woman as the bishop of Rome.

Nonetheless, handing leadership to a woman — and in particular, to a nun — would vastly strengthen Catholicism, help the church solve some of its immediate problems and inspire many who have left the church to look at it with new eyes.

Link

Editor’s note: E. J. Dionne couldn’t be more wrong on this one. Women’s religious orders make up some of the most heterodox groups of Catholics in the world today. Making someone like that pope wouldn’t improve matters, in the least. For abundant proof, all we need to do is look at the shenanigans going on with women and homosexuals in the Anglican/Episcopal Communions. But perhaps Mr. Dionne personally approves of such scandalous goings on? After all, he boasts of “running ahead of the Holy Spirit on this one”. Progressive? Hardly! More like old fashioned, blasphemy!

Homoheresy in the Catholic Church

The most open revolt against the Pope and the Church is headed by some Jesuits in the United States, who openly oppose them and announce that despite the above decisions, they will keep admitting homosexually-oriented seminarians, who are, indeed, especially welcome[26].

They have a long tradition in that vein, for years being the mainstay of homoideology and homoheresy. They take many views of the heretical moral theologian, ex-priest Charles Curran, for their own. They are also under the overwhelming influence of their former fellow friar, F. John McNeill SJ, who founded the pro-homosexual movement called Dignity, and published a book entitled The Church and the Homosexual, where he explicitly rejects the teaching of the Church and adopts homoideology.

The book was given animprimatur by his provincial from New York, and has been republished several times despite being banned by the Vatican. This way, it has become a homosexual bible for many American Jesuits.

McNeill seems to mean more for them than Jesus or Saint Paul, much less the Pope[27]. The Theological Studies and America papers they publish still uphold and promote pro-homosexual ideas. Consequently, it is estimated they have achieved the highest saturation with homosexuals, way above 30 percent. Gays feel more comfortable with them than ever, while other priests find the specific atmosphere less and less bearable[28].

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In case you didn’t know: In a nutshell, the Church—Catholicism—is this…

The universal dimension of the People of God must never be forgotten. Regardless of the nation of which one is a member, the universality “which adorns the people of God” exists to bring all members of the human family back to its source and head who is Christ. (N. 13) This fact demonstrates the “catholicity” of the Church. This universality consists of different ranks based either on the duties of individuals such as “sacred ministry” or on one’s condition and state of life such as family or religious life.

Another important point about the “particular Churches” is that while they may have their own traditions, they must not oppose the primacy of the Chair of Peter. (N. 13) This is something which critics of the “hierarchy” must consider. The pope has a crucial role that must be exercised in the Church’s true nature.

The Church, through all of its members, has been given the responsibility to go out to the world and preach the Good News. (N. 17) In doing so, she must assist those who may otherwise be prone to falling into doctrinal error. This is a problem with and for the LCWR. However, these are the obligations of every disciple who follows Christ. (N. 17) Here the Council Fathers saw need to explicate the specific duties of the various members of the Church taking stock of her “hierarchical structure.”

There’s much, much more

Editor’s note: This article should be recommended reading for every Catholic. It’s that good!

As the author so aptly summarizes: So, this is a little bit about the nature of the Church and Catholicism of which all of us who are interested in Catholicism or claim to be Catholics need to recall and study.

For only $2, you can put an entire digital Catholic library in the hands of an African seminarian…

In Cameroon, Africa, books are rare—especially the good ones. My friend Linus is studying at one of the seminaries, and he says the situation is even worse there. The seminaries are bursting at the seams with young men, yet most lack solid Catholic materials. The libraries are meager and while most of the seminaries have computers, internet is spotty at best.

But what if we could change that? What if we could provide good Catholic books for every seminarian?

I think we can. Through the power of the Catholic blogosphere, I’m convinced we can crowd-source a solution.

That’s why I’ve created the Africa eBook Project. The plan is to send 2,000 CDs to all the seminarians in Cameroon, each loaded with Catholic eBooks including:

Each CD will cost $2 to produce and ship to Africa.

Click here to help

Sorry Ma’am … Ain’t no such thing as women priests in the Catholic Church!

The Roman Catholic Church does not ordain women.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church is very clear on this issue. As it states in the Catechism, #1577: “Only a baptized man validly receives sacred ordination. The Lord Jesus chose men to form the college of the twelve apostles, and the apostles did the same when they chose collaborators to succeed them in their ministry. The college of bishops, with whom the priests are united in the priesthood, makes the college of the twelve an ever-present and ever-active reality until Christ’s return. The Church recognizes herself to be bound by this choice made by the Lord himself. For this reason the ordination of women is not possible.”

The ordination of men to the priesthood is not merely a matter of practice or discipline with the Catholic Church, but rather, it is part of the deposit of faith handed down by Christ through his apostles. The Catholic Church has always followed Jesus’ example and does not believe it has the authority to change what Jesus instituted. The will of Christ is not arbitrary.

The woman who attempted ordination this past weekend may have chosen to be a priest in some other “catholic” church but it is not the one headed by Pope Benedict XVI. She cannot be a priest in a church that has not called her to that priesthood.

She herself states that by attempting ordination and denying the Roman Catholic Church’s teaching in a public act, she has placed herself outside of the Church’s communion. This offers further argument against her “ordination” since to be ordained to the sacred priesthood is to be ordained to obedience in mind and soul to the Church’s magisterium.  One cannot serve in obedience if one was ordained in an act of disobedience.

The Catholic Church’s teaching on the ordination of women does not mean that the Church values women less than men. The Catholic Church is sustained by the important contributions of women each and every day. The Catholic Church has always taught that men and women have the same dignity, but they have different duties or gifts. All these gifts are central to the faith and the life of the Catholic Church.

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Editor’s note: It’s time this type of prideful play acting came to a stop. The Catholic Church has an exclusive and absolute right to decide who it accepts into the priesthood, and it does not need to justify its actions to anyone.

These women do a service to no one, and serve merely to the sow confusion in the Body of Christ. There’s way too much of that going around, already!

1968 was a very bad year for the Catholic Church … and the world

English historian Paul Johnson dubs 1968 as the year of “America’s Suicide Attempt.” It included the Tet offensive in Vietnam with its tsunami-like effects in American life and politics, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee; the tumult in American cities on Palm Sunday weekend; and the June assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy in Southern California. It was also the year in which Pope Paul VI issued his encyclical letter on transmitting human life, Humanae Vitae (HV). He met immediate, premeditated, and unprecedented opposition from some American theologians and pastors. By any measure, 1968 was a bitter cup….

The summer of 1968 is a record of God’s hottest hour. The memories are not forgotten; they are painful. They remain vivid like a tornado in the plains of Colorado. They inhabit the whirlwind where God’s wrath dwells. In 1968, something terrible happened in the Church. Within the ministerial priesthood, ruptures developed everywhere among friends which never healed. And the wounds continue to affect the whole Church. The dissent, together with the leaders’ manipulation of the anger they fomented, became a supreme test. It changed fundamental relationships within the Church. It was a Peirasmòs [i.e. a trial, a test of faith] for many.

During the height of the 1968 Baltimore riots following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., I had made an emergency call to [an] inner-city pastor…He described the view from the rectory while speaking on the phone…his parish was becoming a raging inferno. He said, “From here I see nothing but fire burning everywhere. Everything has been set ablaze. The Church and rectory are untouched thus far.” He did not wish to leave or be evacuated. His voice betrayed disillusionment and fear. Later we learned that the parish buildings survived.

Memories of the physical violence in the city in April 1968 [following the king Assassination] helped me to name what had happened in August 1968 [in the explosion of dissent against Humanae Vitae]. Ecclesial dissent can become a kind of spiritual violence in its form and content.

What do I mean? Look at the results of the two events. After the violent 1968 Palm Sunday weekend, civil dialogue in metropolitan Baltimore broke down and came to a stop. It took a back seat to open anger and recriminations between whites and blacks. The…priests’ August gathering [against Humane Vitae] gave rise to its own ferocious acrimony. Conversations among the clergy…became contaminated with fear. Suspicions among priests were chronic. Fears abounded. And they continue. The Archdiocesan priesthood lost something of the fraternal whole which Baltimore priests had known for generations. 1968 marked the hiatus of the generational communio….Priests’ fraternity had been wounded. Pastoral dissent had attacked the Eucharistic foundation of the Church. Its nuptial significance had been denied. Some priests saw bishops as nothing more than Roman mannequins.

Cardinal Shehan later reported that on Monday morning, August 5, he “was startled to read in the Baltimore Sun that seventy-two priests of the Baltimore area had signed the Statement of Dissent.” What he later called “the years of crisis” began for him during that hot… August evening in 1968….Its unhinging consequences continue. Abusive, coercive dissent has become a reality in the Church and subjects her to violent, debilitating, unproductive, chronic controversies.

The violence of the initial disobedience was only a prelude to further and more pervasive violence. …Contempt for the truth, whether aggressive or passive, has become common in Church life. Dissenting priests, theologians and laypeople have continued their coercive techniques. From the beginning, the press has used them to further its own serpentine agenda.  (These are excerpts, Click HERE for the full article).

Read more form Msgr. Charles Pope

Reasons to believe: The Catholic Church remains the only truly “non-denominational” Christian church.

by Doug Lawrence

In today’s increasingly confused, scandalized and secular culture, more and more people seem to be describing their religious inclinations as “non-denominational”.

Most seem to believe that “non-denominational” means to be associated with no particular Christian group, or to ascribe to no particular Christian creed.

As in most things however, the Catholic Church long ago correctly defined the meaning of the word “non-denominational”. It happened on Pentecost Sunday, the day the one, holy, apostolic, universal Christian church officially came into being.

Known then as simply “the Church” … Catholicism is most definitely not a mere denomination. It is the one and only true church, founded personally by Jesus Christ, while he still walked the earth, in the divine hope that all should be one, in him.

Thanks to the promised, continuing advocacy of the Holy Spirit, the Catholic Church continues to enjoy the fullness of all God’s truth, and the complete range of all God’s spiritual gifts, to this day.

One has to wonder, what could there possibly be to gain from membership in a “non-denominational” denomination? Wouldn’t that be a lot like intentionally patronizing a restaurant that regularly serves food of questionable purity and/or quality? The prospect boggles the mind!

Members of other Christian denominations also have to deal with certain fundamental  irrationalities. Various Protestant groups prefer to be called Evangelical, Pentecostal, Apostolic, Charismatic, Baptist, Full Gospel, Bible Church, and many other things, but in the end (or rather, the beginning) the Catholic Church was already all of that, and much, much more … which further points to the fullness of Catholic truth, as clearly manifest in the Bible, Sacred and Apostolic Tradition, the Sacraments, the Priesthood, the Papacy, the Magisterium, and so many other things.

From this we can determine beyond a shadow of a doubt that the Catholic Church is not merely the first and only truly “non-denominational” Christian church, it also remains the only authentic and original Bible Believing, Pentecostal, Charismatic, Evangelical, Apostolic, Full Gospel, Water Baptizing, Universal Church of Jesus Christ.

And that, my friends, despite the Catholic Church’s many and continuing difficulties and scandals, should provide more than sufficient reason to believe!

Newly ordained priest tells it like it is. Let’s hope he doesn’t get in trouble for it!

Noting that seven of the 10 priests ordained that day were born outside the U.S., Owen blamed the dearth of home-grown priests partly on our affluent society.

“We don’t need God anymore,” he lamented. “Because we have money and material possessions, we can get along fine — that is until someone has a serious tragedy and then it’s ‘God help me!'” By contrast, he pointed out, there are 1,400 students enrolled in the Catholic seminary in Kenya.

He put the responsibility for the lack of U.S. vocations squarely on the shoulders of many older priests.

“I blame the priests here in Chicago and in the U.S.,” he said. “They’re not attractive. They are not leading a lifestyle that is authentic. Why would anyone want to give their life to that?”

Because it was instituted by Christ himself, he believes the Roman Catholic Church is doesn’t need to change. He argued that some want to make the church more like American society, i.e. to make it more democratic, but the Church exists to transform society, not the other way around.

“That’s part of the problem,” he contends. “We want to be part of the culture. Yes, we can take some elements from the culture, but that’s not the way Christ set it up. The church is not a democracy.”

Because the Catholic Church is a divine creation he believes he can maintain very firm boundaries without a hint of judgmentalism. When asked if he would give communion to a gay man living openly in a committed relationship, his answer was no. Would he allow a Lutheran pastor to preach the homily in a “mixed marriage” wedding in his church? No. Would he give communion to a Protestant at Mass? No again. Nothing personal, that’s just the way it is.

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This Week’s “Dispersing the Smoke of Satan”: Grapling with the widespread failure of American Catholic Church leaders to teach and defend Catholic truth.



In 1972, Pope Paul VI observed,

“From some fissure,
the smoke of Satan
has entered the Temple of God.”

The purpose of this weekly column is to help wake
the bulk of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics
from their self-imposed slumber
and powerfully remind them of who they are,
and what they are called by God, to be.

This week’s story: Spiritual Abuse

In September of 2002, Father Joseph Fessio, S.J. addressed the group, “Catholic Citizens of Illinois” where he attempted to explain the various causes of the diabolical crisis in which the post-Vatican II Catholic Church has become mired.

“What we are seeing today is a crisis in fidelity to Catholic truth: in accepting that truth on the part of the faithful and the priests, and on enforcing and defending that truth on the part of Bishops.”

Father Fessio was quick to point that “the crisis in the Church today is not pedophilia.” Indeed, the overwhelming majority of abuse cases involve homosexual priests molesting teenage boys barely under the age of eighteen. In the past decades, hundreds of problem priests have simply been shuffled back and forth from parish to parish, leaving trails of abuse across the country.

“It’s not just a problem of priests who are homosexuals”, cautioned Father Fessio, “but Bishops who are derelict in their duties. These scandals have been covered up, lies have been told, and lies have become a culture in some areas.” He also noted that while hundreds of priests have been defrocked, the colossal failure of the Bishops to root out and correct sexual deviancy in their own dioceses has yet to result in any Bishop being removed.

Faithful Catholics see the cause of the sex abuse crisis as the rejection of the Church’s traditional teaching on sexual morality by American society, including, sadly, most Catholics.

But the Faith was lost first.

St. Paul says of those who lost their Faith, “they were turned over to their lusts”. Father Fessio noted that the crisis of dissenting Catholic laity, priests and Bishops was born in the rejection the Church’s teaching in Humanae Vitae, published in 1968, which reinforced long held Catholic values in the midst of the hedonistic revolution known as ‘the Sixties.’

This revolution has ushered in a growing plague of societal ills — divorce, child and spousal abuse, rape, and abortion — that emerge from the disordered ‘free love’ view of human sexuality that dominates our culture today.

Commenting on the traditional Catholic view, Father Fessio affirmed that “God created us male and female for a number of purposes, but he made the marriage bond sacred, so that there is an indissoluble bond between the marriage act and openness to life. But if you dissolve that bond…there’s no way to justify restricting that pleasure to only married couples. Why not outside of marriage?”

The removal of the unity of sexual intimacy and marriage has “removed the bulwark that helped people to resist sexual temptation” and other moral lapses.

Read more

*****

If we begin to step up in faith, God will certainly lead us forward. If not, this mess in which we we presently find ourselves will likely continue to worsen … and we will all deservedly
suffer the consequences!

This is a time for heroes, for straight talk, for prayer, and for inspired, creative thinking. This is a time for good people
of action (and substantial intestinal fortitude) to step up,
realize their true vocation, and become saints.

Any ideas or suggestions? Anything that’s working well
in your parish? How about things that are NOT working,
but should be? Let us know about it!

Click here to send in
your detailed comments and suggestions.
We’ll post them every Tuesday
in our new weekly column

“Dispersing the Smoke of Satan”

Your comments and suggestions are very welcome.

Thank you!

Father Corapi quits the Catholic priesthood. Starts new ministry outside the church.


His
eight and one-half minute long
You Tube video statement
says it all.

The new John Corapi website

The new facebook page

The old facebook page

A complete summary
of all the Father Corapi articles posted,
to-date.

Editor’s note: ???????!

Great story: Presbyterian to Catholic conversion eventual leads to priestly vocation.

I grew up in a Presbyterian family, fairly consistent churchgoers, and I had always harbored an interest in religion. My father’s business took us abroad when I was very young, and most of my childhood was spent living in countries in Latin America. Most of my friends who were “serious” about religion were in fact Catholic, so I grew up touched by a favorable view of the Church. When we lived in Brazil, I attended an English-speaking Catholic school, and I vividly recall being one of the few children who were not able to receive Holy Communion during our weekly Mass. It was that hunger to receive Our Lord that would one day blossom into the grace of conversion and the faith to believe in the Real Presence of the Eucharist.

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Hopeful post from the brother of a Catholic seminarian

If these men are any indication of the kinds of people who will emerge as the priests and leaders of the Catholic Church in this new century, there are great days ahead for them, and more and more people are going to experience the Gospel in real, tangible ways.

Read the entire post

Two priests write about the problem of homosexuality and pederasty.

Matt C. Abbott’s column

That ‘gay priest’ debate… May 7, 2011
A reader recently sent me a link to a commentary titled “Are Gay Priests the Problem?” by author and ABC News religion contributor Father Edward L. Beck, C.P.Father Beck’s commentary, which can be read by clicking here, is problematic in certain respects, so I thought I’d ask Father Richard Perozich of the Diocese of San Diego — a promoter of the Courage Apostolate — if he’d like to respond to Father Beck.Father Perozich graciously emailed me the following response (slightly edited):

Seen on the web: Scandal trumped up by homosexuals in the church to bring Father Corapi down?

Quote from: Gerard:

Quote from: Lavalliere

I think Fr. Corapi stepped on someone’s toes and they have it in for him.

I am no groupie of his. I don’t watch EWTN nor do I listen to what purports to be Catholic radio. But I have been following this latest brouhaha. I have noticed how the neo-cats aren’t being very sympathetic to him. Looks to me like word has filtered down from the “powers that be” grapevine to denigrate Fr. Corapi, which is why I am saying that it appears to me that he didn’t play ball with someone and they have it in for him…big time. To tell you the truth, even if “evidence” that will convict him is forthcoming, I won’t buy it.

It is inconceivable to me that anyone who has been through what Fr. Corapi has been through would be so foolish as to let down his spiritual guard and throw it all away for a silly and cunning woman; yes, that’s right, a silly and cunning woman, who isn’t worth the loss of his soul or his priesthood.

Remember, you heard it first from Lavalliere. Just consider this a Fisheaters Exclusive. Smiley

This is 100% speculation on my part, so don’t take any of it as anything else. I have only anecdotes to reference that inspired this speculation. I think he upset the homosexual network within the hierarchy. In 2006 he did a series called “Catholic Come Home” and he blasted homosexual activity with a level of force that would have made Bishop Williamson tell him to dial it back if he’d been in the room.

In 2010 he touched on the subject again and clearly stated the Church’s talking points on the subject but he also added the usual don’t harass, ridicule or treat badly anyone suffering with this disorder. It was fine, but he definitely made an effort to soften the edges of his presentation. I suspected that somebody in the hierarchy got to him on that issue and ordered him to change his approach.

This no doubt. The militant homosexuals who have infiltrated the Church over the years despise this man greatly and have had it out for him for years. They will attempt to destroy Fr’s ministry anyway they can and are not concerned about playing by the rules. The homosexuals are an especially nasty group and will pull out all the stops in getting what they want, just like in the secular world.

There was a thread started about homosexuality collapsing empires, well they’re doing their best to collapse the Church even at a time where the church has gone out of it’s way placating them and sugarcoating their “disorder”, they don’t care about that, they want 100% acceptance and equality and the education of children into their “lifestyle”.. Nothing else will suffice.

Also as mentioned in other threads, there is a war going on right now within the Church and the usurpers need to get good priests Fr Corapi and Fr E out of the way so the real onslaught can begin. I even see them going after the pro-life priests next in their little culture war against the more conservative clergy across the board.

Link

Priest: “The Catholic Church is really two Churches now.”

The relaxation of the role of the priesthood, what Kreitzer calls a “denigration of genuine priestly charism of the ordained while instilling a false sense of clericalism in the laity,” helped contribute a worldwide sex abuse scandal lying dormant but that would soon emerge, like a full-blown virus, many years down the road. “It fit with the times when priests were encouraged to escape the sanctuary while the laity flocked to it,” Kreitzer writes, meaning that, if the Church could change a 1,500 year-old liturgy in a couple years, then anything was changeable—and possible, even behavior related to Allen Ginsberg’s famous line, “This form of life needs sex.”

While some sexual abuse cases occurred prior to the Council, most occurred in the 1960s and 70s, when the Church was in the midst of its so-called “springtime.”

According to Thomas Plante, Professor and Chair of Psychology, Santa Clara University, the average age of the priest abuser in 2002 was 53. That means that the vast majority of abuse cases coming to light today are from 20, 30 and 40 years ago, the post Vatican II years, when ‘ liturgical experimentation’ was at its height. At that time not much was understood about sexual abuse. It wasn’t until the early 1980s, as Plante suggests in his book, Bless Me Father for I Have Sinned, that serious research began in this area.

Abuser priests identified by Church authorities 20, 30 or 40 years ago, were given the usual Bayer aspirin treatment: a therapeutic slap on the wrist and 30 days of isolated prayer in a faraway retreat. After that, they were discreetly recycled and farmed out to a different parish setting. It was all very much like signing off on a traffic ticket, or getting your mouth washed out with soap, sans the obligatory cold shower.

Read more

“The Priesthood” by Father Peter Joseph

Introduction by Eamonn Keane

…Given the widespread misunderstanding regarding the origin and nature of the ordained priesthood both inside the Catholic Church itself and beyond, a problem that has been exacerbated by the clerical sexual abuse scandals of recent times, I thought it would be worthwhile to produce a series of articles on the priesthood. As the first in the series I publish below an article authored by Australian theologian Fr. Peter Joseph titled The Priesthood. The article was first published by the Catholic Adult Education Centre in Sydney in 2009 as INFORM 120: Faith & Life Matters. I am grateful to the editor of Inform for giving me permission to reproduce the article here in my RenewAmerica column. It is the first time it has been published online.

Read The Priesthood by Father Peter Joseph

Editor’s note: The most essential and primary role of the priest is to offer sacrifice to God, for the people. The Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the Catholic Holy Eucharist is the primary reason that we Catholics, for our ministers, require nothing less than suitably ordained priests.

And while every Catholic priest is indeed also a minister … not every minister is a priest … since only suitably ordained ministers (ordained in and through the Catholic Sacrament of Holy Orders, by the Catholic bishop’s duly authorized, laying on of hands) receive (among other things) the power from God to change ordinary bread and wine into the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ, at Mass.

The Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the holiest sacrament of the altar further underscores the fact that Catholic priests are true priests indeed … since at Mass, they offer up for us to God … nothing less than Jesus Christ … who remains the only acceptable sacrifice for the sins of the world.

Since priests carry on the ministry of Jesus Christ, literally acting in Jesus’ place … assisting the bishops in their task of teaching, sanctifying and governing … it’s not surprising that clerical failings and scandals wound so deeply the hearts of the Catholic faithful.

All the more reason we Catholics should demand strict oversight of our seminaries, and total accountability from those who are in charge of priestly formation and education … something which has been substantially out of control now, for several decades.