Newly installed Miami Archbishop speaks about Catholics and the state of the present day world

“To a world tempted to live as if God doesn’t matter and therefore a world that teeters on the brink of despair, we, the Church, need to witness to hope by showing– by what we say and do (and by what we won’t do) – how beautiful, how joyful life is when one lives convinced that God does indeed matter.”

“For this reason,” he stressed, “Catholics should involve themselves in the public square – and do so coherently and unapologetically. Thus, we bring to public policy debates on issues of human life dignity, justice and peace, immigration reform, and marriage and the family an understanding of the human person that, while founded on the Christian Scriptures, is also accessible to human reason.”

“While this understanding expressed in the Church’s social teachings can seem to be quite complex, I believe it can be summarized in one simple phrase: no man is a problem,” Archbishop Wenski said.

“This why as Archbishop of Miami I will continue to proclaim a positive and consistent ethic of life: no human being – no matter how poor or how weak – can be reduced to just a problem. When we allow ourselves to think of a human being as a mere problem, we offend his or her dignity.”

“For us, Catholics, therefore, there can be no such thing as a ‘problem pregnancy,’” he explained, “only a child who is to be welcome in life and protected by law. The refugee, the migrant – even one without ‘papers’ –  is not a problem. He may perhaps be a stranger but a stranger to be embraced as a brother.

“Even criminals – for all the horror of their crimes – do not lose their God-given dignity as human beings. They too must be treated with respect, even in their punishment,” he added.

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Cardinal DiNardo Rebukes Critics on Health Care Involvement

All throughout 2009 many bishops have entered the national debate in regards to defending fundamental moral values and rectifying misinformation from wayward Catholics in political life.  This year seems to be the year the bishops found their voice.  Not since Francis Cardinal Spellman graced the New York Archdiocese have we seen the faithful being led with strong ecclesial leadership from all parts of the country.

Addressing the criticism directed at religious leaders speaking up on these important issues Cardinal DiNardo said,

“Whatever the polls say, that would not determine going into the public square on those issues,”

“For us, the role of the human person, it’s a religious and a moral and ethical principle.”

“We believe legislation that violates this moral principle is not true health care reform and must be amended to reflect it. If that fails, the current legislation should be opposed,”

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