Today’s Question: How do you know what God’s answer is when you ask him a question?

Question: How do you know what God’s answer is when you ask him a question?

Answer: You wait and watch, while you continue in prayer and thanksgiving, believing that you will receive.

Asked and answered on Yahoo! Answers.

A moment of grace: A universal affirmation of faith.

Responding to a rather complicated, multi-point,
on-line question about my Catholic faith,
a rather simple, all encompassing answer came to mind.
I share it with you, here:

God answers my prayers. God provides for all my needs.
God speaks to me when I need to hear from him.
God blesses me beyond measure.
God gives me hope.
For my part, I do my best to know, love and serve God,
every way I can, and to give him the thanks,
praise and worship that he is due.

The answers to three key Catholic questions speak volumes

questionOnce again let me stress that I developed this set of questions in the mid-1980s as a journalistic tool. The goal, when asking these questions, is to listen carefully to the answers.

It is especially interesting, of course, to note when people remain silence or try to find a way to maneuver around the questions without answering.

Different types of believers, of course, have different answers. The goal is to listen carefully and then respond with follow-up questions that yield nuggets of on-the-record doctrinal, as opposed to political, information. The goal is to transcend mere labels.

Here are those questions, once again:

(1) Are the biblical accounts of the resurrection of Jesus accurate? Did this event really happen?

(2) Is salvation found through Jesus Christ, alone? Was Jesus being literal when he said, “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (John 14:6)?

(3) Is sex outside of the Sacrament of Marriage a sin?

Link to story

What Journalists Should Ask Liberals and “Enlightened” Conservatives About Marriage

In case no one has noticed, journalists never ask Democrats the hard questions regarding homosexuality—and I mean never.  Perhaps our news show hosts should ask their guests and panelists these questions:

1.  Many compare same-sex marriage to interracial marriage. In what specific ways is homosexuality like race?

2. If the institution of marriage has nothing inherently to do with sexual complementarity and procreative potential, then why should it be limited to two people or to people who are not close blood relatives?

3. If marriage is—as the Left claims it is–solely the institutional recognition of deeply felt, intense loving feelings between people, why should the government prohibit two brothers who are in love from marrying? If people should be allowed to marry whomever they love—as the Left claims they should be–then why shouldn’t two brothers and their mutual boyfriend be permitted to marry?

4. Does marriage have an inherent nature that government merely recognizes, or does society create it out of whole cloth?

5. Are rights granted to couples or to individuals?

6. Are rights accorded to people based on their objective characteristics or on their subjective feelings and volitional acts?

More

A few basic catechism questions for post-Vatican II Catholics

 Who is buried in Jesus’ tomb?

If you didn’t know the answer to that one, try this:

Who is buried in Mary’s tomb?

And finally…

Who is buried in St. Peter’s tomb – and where is that tomb located?

Ten questions every Catholic (even children) should be able to answer

  1. What are the two kinds of sin (original and actual)
  2. What are the two kinds of actual sin (mortal and venial)? What’s the difference?
  3. Name the three Persons of the Holy Trinity
  4. Is there one God or three Gods?
  5. Name the 7 Sacraments

Read more

Site provides advice and refuge for those choosing to leave Islam.


Visit the site

Crass, insensitive, but necessary questions for President Obama.


President Obama: Do Sasha and Malia have any aborted brothers or sisters? If so, how many? Is that the reason for your unqualified support for abortion rights? Did the First Lady consult with you about that? Are you in denial? Do you have any regrets? Does Mrs. Obama?

St. Thomas Aquinas teaches us about angels

(QUESTIONS 50 TO 64)

50. THE SUBSTANCE OF THE ANGELS

1. Creatures exist in a series of grades. They participate and represent the goodness of God in various ways. In the world about us, there are three kinds of substances: mineral, vegetal, animal. These are all bodily substances. We find also in this world the human substance which is mineral, vegetal, and animal, and yet is something more; it is not all bodily; man has a spiritual soul. To round out the order of things, there must be some purely spiritual or nonbodily substances. Thus createdsubstances are: the completely bodily substance, the substance that is a compound of body and spirit, and the completely spiritual substance. Completely spiritual substances are called angels.

2. A bodily substance is composed of two substantial elements, primal matter and substantial form. In angels there is no compounding of matter and form. Matter does not exist in angels; they are pure substantial forms. That is to say, they are pure spirits; they are spirits with no admixture of matter in them.

3. Holy Scripture (Dan. 7:10) indicates the existence of a vast multitude of angels: “Thousands of thousands ministered to Him, and ten thousand times a hundred thousand stood before Him.” Indeed, since the intention back of creation is the perfection of the universe as sharing and representing the divine goodness, it appears that the more perfect creatures should abound in largest multitude. It is, therefore, reasonable to suppose that angels exist in a multitude far exceeding the number of material things.

4. In bodily substances we distinguish their species or essential kind, and their status as individuals of that kind. For example, we distinguish in a man, (a) what makes him a human being, and (b) what makes him this one human being. Now, that which constitutes a thing in its species or essential kind is called the principle of specification. And that which constitutes a thing as this one item or instance of its kind is called the principle of individuation. In all creatures, the principle of specification is the substantial form which makes the creature an existing thing of its essential kind. And the principle of individuation is matter or bodiliness inasmuch as it is marked by quantity. Since angels have in them no matter or bodiliness at all, for they are pure spirits, they are not individuated. This means that each angel is the only one of its kind. It means that each angel is a species or essential kind of substantial being. Hence each angel is essentially different from every other angel.

5. The angels are incorruptible substances. This means that they cannot die, decay, break up, or be substantially changed. For the root of corruptibility in a substance is matter, and in the angels there is no matter.

51. ANGELS AND BODIES

1. Angels have no bodies. An intellectual nature (that is, a substantial essence equipped for understanding and willing) does not require a body. In man, because the body is substantially united with the spiritual soul, intellectual activities (understanding and willing) presuppose the body and its senses. But an intellect in itself, or as such, requires nothing bodily for its activity. The angels are pure spirits without a body, and their intellectual operations of understanding and willing depend in no way at all upon material substance.

2. That the angels sometimes assume bodies is known from Holy Scripture. Angels appeared in bodily form to Abraham and his household; the angel Raphael came in the guise of a young man to be the companion of the younger Tobias.

3. In bodies thus assumed, angels do not actually exercise the functions of true bodily life. When an angel in human form walks and talks, he exercises angelic power and uses the bodily organs as instruments. But he does not make the body live, or make it his own body.

53. ANGELS AND LOCAL MOVEMENT

1. Since an angel can be in a place (by definitive presence), it can be first in this place and afterwards in that place. That is to say, an angel can move locally. But this local movement of an angel is not like the local movement of a body. An angel is in a place by exercising its powers there; it can cease to apply its powers there and begin to apply them elsewhere; and this, equivalently at least, is a kind of local movement.

2. By this sort of local movement an angel may, at will, be present successively in several places and thus may be said to pass through the space between the first and the last place of the series. Or an angel may cease to apply its powers in the first place and begin to apply them in the last, not passing through the space between.

3. Since there is succession, that is, before-and-after, in the application of an angel’s powers, now here and now there, it must be said that an angel’s local movement occurs in time, and is not instantaneous. This time, however, is not measurable in our minutes or seconds; these units of time are applicable only to bodily movement.

Read questions 54 to 64

Questions and answers about marriage between Catholics and non-Catholics.

This site contains and extensive collection of questions and answers about “mixed marriages” between Catholics and non-Catholics.

You’ll find a wide variety of different opinions, but you’ll most likely find the answers you need, as well.

Feel free to write us here, if you need some clarification … or talk to your local priest.

Interfaith Marriage Questions/Answers

General Catholic Q&A Forum

Book Selection: Divorce, annulments, and the Catholic Church

By Matt C. Abbott

The following are excerpts from the book Annulments and the Catholic Church: Straight Answers to Tough Questions, authored by canon and civil lawyer Edward Peters. The book is written mostly in question-and-answer format, with 100 questions on the topic of Church annulments being answered by Dr. Peters. Thanks to Matthew Pinto and Mike Flickinger of Ascension Press for allowing me to reprint this material.

Read the article

Sotomayor reportedly only “minimally” Catholic

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There are indications that Judge Sotomayor is more like the majority of American Catholics: those who were raised in the faith and shaped by its values, but who do not attend Mass regularly and are not particularly active in religious life. Like many Americans, Judge Sotomayor may be what religion scholars call a “cultural Catholic” — a category that could say something about her political and social attitudes.

Interviews with more than a dozen of Judge Sotomayor’s friends from high school, college, law school and professional life said they had never heard her talk about her faith, and had no recollection of her ever going to Mass or belonging to a parish.

Read the article

Got A Question?

www.AskMeAboutGod.Org

Hello world!

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Welcome to my new Blog.

I currently spend a lot of time defending the Catholic faith in cyber space, fielding about 6,000 questions per year, on various faith “issues”.

To reach me, email your faith question(s) or comments to: Questions@AskMeAboutGod.Org

My personal background is in research, sales, marketing, and training … with specialties in the marine, aviation, manufacturing, and publishing fields.

When it was time for me to “shop around” for a life-long affiliation with an authentic and truly practical “faith-based organization” I began an extensive personal  research project in order to verify the claims and/or practical benefits of most every known religion on planet Earth.

While my preferences probably leaned towards some sort of Christianity, I no longer had any real allegiance to any particular group, tradition, or confession. Nothing was ruled out. Nothing “off limits”. 

Several years and a couple of computers later, I came to the irrovocable conclusion that the Catholic Church was precisely what it claimed to be, that it was was complete in all respects, with regard to source, authenticity, mission, scope, leadership, history, personal services and benefits (both temporal and spiritual), and that the Church backed it all up with a complete, logical, and correct “sacred deposit of faith” that was illuminated by a 2000 year tradition of some of the world’s finest theological scholarship, culminating in the current day “Catechism of the Catholic Church” … which isn’t perfect … but very close to it.

At the same time, I realized that the Catholic Church was suffering from some of the worst management that the world had likely ever seen … at least in the field of religion … as evidenced by the recent abuse scandals, the dearth of new priestly vocations, and by the wide variation in the quality and fidelity of Catholic catechesis and practices, throughout the United States.

The state of the traditional “Catholic” universities also appeared particularly dismal, with few if any of the well known schools providing what would pass for a truly Catholic curriculum anymore … while the numbers of Catholic primary and secondary schools … which were always known for high quality, efficiently priced education … were also fading fast.

Getting back to basics, what attracted me to Catholicism was the ability to trace virtually every existing practice or teaching back to the original source … and the hope that God would eventually be able to overcome whatever problems there were.

And while there have been lots of Catholics, over lots of generations, in lots and lots of different countries, all over the world, the simple fact is, EVERYTHING CATHOLIC regarding faith, morals, and dogma (at least, in concept) can be faithfully traced back to the New Testament of the Bible, to the original apostles, directly back to Jesus Christ, and/or to some highly significant Old Testament practice or principle.

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 All of which makes practical … rather than blind … FAITH the only necessity, for Catholics.

And speaking about practicality … the Catholic faith has a sacrament or a prayer for just about everyone, at any stage in life, for defeat, for triumph, for sickness, for health, for children or adults, family or friends, single or married, for life, and for death … with a particular emphasis on preparation for the imminent end of life. 

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During the course of my initial research, I amassed a huge volume (about 1 gigabyte) of carefully catalogued and organized Catholic resource materials … the best of the last 2000 years of Catholic scholarship and theology, plus some current day presentations that pull it all together into a “point and click simple” and ready to run package.

 If you would like a copy of my Catholic Resource CD, send me an email with a postal shipping address, and I’ll get one out to you right away. A limited supply of the CD’s are presently available for free.

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Blessings and Peace, to you and yours.

Doug Lawrence