What Pope Francis never told you: Present-Day Judaism is not Old Testament Judaism

destrjerusalem

General Titus’ Siege of Jerusalem – Pentecost Sunday, 70 A.D.

“What The Jews Believe” is the subject to which “Life” magazine devoted eleven pages of its September 11th issue. The writer, Rabbi Philip S. Bernstein of Rochester, N. Y., is the president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, “the largest organization of rabbis in the world.” The article enforces the conviction that the Judaism of today is not Old Testament Judaism.

The two opening sentences alone of the lengthy article warrant the above declaration, viz:—“The Jew has no single organized church. He has no priests.” This is enlarged upon in these words:—“The congregation’s rabbi is a teacher, not a priest.” The rabbi is “without any vested ecclesiastical authority, he is not even necessary to the functioning of the synagogue. Any male Jew with sufficient knowledge of the prayers and the laws can conduct a religious service, officiate at marriages and bury the dead.”

This is not new in Jewry. Ludwig Lewisohn, professor of English literature at Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass., says in his “Mid-Channel”:—“With the destruction of the Temple the sacrificial cult of the Jews was destroyed. For among the people there was but one altar, hence the Jewish people were suddenly laicized. Priests and sacrifices and tangible mysteries were no more.”

Surely this is not Old Testament Judaism, which was, as the Catholic Church is, an authoritative God-instituted priestly religion; the high priest being the supreme ecclesiastical authority. Aaron was its Peter, who was ordained by God through his brother Moses (Exodus 28), having successors until about the time of the destruction of the Temple in the year 70 A. D.

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Randy Engel’s Old Time Religion Prescription, for Catholics

… let us continue to do all that is necessary for our own salvation and for those entrusted to our care. We need to be soldiers of Christ and for Christ. Cradle Catholics like me know the holy drill well enough, at least in part, but it nevertheless bears repeating.

Following the four divisions of the doctrines of salvation found in The Catechism of the Council of Trent: the Apostles Creed (what we are to believe); the Sacraments (the instruments of grace); the Ten Commandments (what we must do); and the Lord’s Prayer (whatever can be the object of the Christian’s desires, or hopes, or prayers), let us strive to:

  • Love God with our whole heart, our whole soul, our whole mind, and with our whole strength, and our neighbor as thyself.
  • Live the spiritual life according to our state in life.
  • Be modest in speech, dress and demeanor as is befitting a child of God
  • Keep custody of our eyes; avoid the near occasions of sin.
  • Keep ourselves in the state of grace.
  • Attend the Traditional Mass.
  • Frequent the Sacraments especially that of Penance and the Holy Communion.
  • Bring the body under subjugation by fasting, acts of penance, and the offering up of sufferings in reparation for thy sins and those of the world.
  • Read Holy Scripture; set time apart for daily meditation and recitation of the Rosary, before the Blessed Sacrament when possible.
  • Cultivate a special devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Attend First Friday and First Saturday Masses.
  • Pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory and unbaptized children in Limbo.
  • Pray to our Guardian Angel and to our patron saint (s) daily.
  • Make generous use of Sacramentals especially the Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.
  • Pray for our enemies recalling the words of Saint Thomas More written in the Tower of London, 1534: “To think my most enemies my best friends, for the brethren of Joseph could never have done him so much good with their love and favor as they did him with their malice and hatred.”
  • Give Glory to the One Triune God — Father, Son and Holy Ghost — always and everywhere.

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Many American Catholics, priests, and pro-lifers cite to how the Orthodox Jews are pro-life. But that is just not true.

The UOJC has something called an Institute for Public Affairs (IPA) and the IPA formulates the issues for involvement in American politics by the Orthodox Jews.

A quick review of the IPA’s website reveals a number of links in support of embryonic stem cell research and cloning of human beings. For instance, the first link is to an article by Dr. Daniel Eisenberg dated January 8, 2001 and entitled “Stem Cell Research in Jewish Law.”

The article provides the justification under Judaism for killing innocent human beings during the course of embryonic stem cell research: Dr. Eisenberg writes “If the pre-embryo may be destroyed, it certainly may be used for research purpose and other life-saving work.”[xxi]

Dr. Eisenberg undertakes a long and convoluted analysis under Jewish law to arrive at this conclusion, and of great note is this comment: “While the practical aspects of the Jewish approach to abortion are relatively agreed upon, the exact source and nature of the prohibition [to taking of pre-born life] is not. Depending on the origin of the prohibition, the application to the pre-embryo will differ.”[xxii] In other words, the Jews cannot find the authority for giving life to the unborn, and the tenets of Judaism are up for debate – a not unlikely result given that the Jews reject Christ, the Logos, and with Him, the Advocate.

What can be given in one argument based on interpretation of arcane documents can be taken in another argument based on a different interpretation. The practical result (and, according to Dr. Eisbenberg the Jews agree on certain practical approaches) is support for embryonic stem cell research and the creation and support of an entire industry engaged in the slaughter.

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Jews are probably amongst the most devout abortion supporters in America.

American Jews are probably amongst the most devout abortion supporters in America.  Those Jews who vote on the abortion-ticket like to point to a very old rabbinic tradition holding that, if a woman is dying during labor, it is acceptable to kill the child, provided that the child has not yet seen the light of day.  Later rabbinic thought expanded this holding to place the child’s life over the mother’s at all times.

These were always narrow exceptions, though.  Pragmatic considerations had to be balanced against God’s injunction to “choose life” and to “be fruitful and multiply.”  Also, in pre-modern times, abortion was both unpopular and risky, and medicine limited a physician’s ability even to assess the risks a pregnant woman was facing.  The early Jewish philosophers were dealing with anomalies that justified abortion, not with Planned Parenthood clinics in every neighborhood.

Although the rabbis wouldn’t recognize abortion today, modern Jews rely on ancient and narrow rabbinical strictures to embrace an ideology that allows abortion, not only in life and death situations, but at all points in time during the pregnancy, and for all reasons.  I grew up, therefore, in a very abortion-friendly milieu.

I also grew up in a Holocaust milieu.  Without exception, all of the older Jewish people whom I knew when I was growing up had a connection to the Holocaust, whether they’d escaped it or lost people to it.  The Holocaust was a defining backdrop to my childhood.

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