Seen on the Web: Promote the Sacrament of Reconciliation by serving beverages and snacks…

Seen on the Web: Promote the Sacrament of Reconciliation by serving beverages and snacks.

Editor’s note: It wasn’t clear whether refreshments would be served to those waiting in line, in the confessional, or later, after doing penance. But, consider the possibilities!

In Another Groundbreaking Act, Pope Francis Confesses His Sins in Public

Pope Francis continued his rock star turn yesterday by breaking with tradition and publicly confessing his sins while leading a penitential liturgy in St. Peter’s Basilica.

The pope, dressed in a simple white alb and purple stole, spent about three minutes kneeling before the priest’s open confessional and received absolution.

Link

Editor’s note: There’s nothing “groundbreaking” about a Catholic going to Confession – especially during Lent.

Pope Francis: Jesus is a sinner…

“Jesus is a sinner, we take His own sins to Him and we tell Him, this is Yours and I’m going back out into the world to do it again. Jesus likes that.”

If this scandal is really Francis’ statement, then our Pope is a blasphemer and public heretic.

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Editor’s note: See the story and verify the comments here on the official Vatican news website.

Once a Catholic, always a Catholic – you hope!

One of the sweet things about being a priest is being able to minister at a person’s deathbed. The veil between this world and the next is very thin at that point, and you can see so much. When I say you can “see” so much what I mean is that so much is revealed. At that point the person who is dying is usually very vulnerable and open. Their worldly facade is fading. Their accomplishments and pride are forgotten. They realize that all the stuff of this world will soon be left behind.

Often the person is quietly sleeping. The family is gathered around and there is no response as the last rites are given. On the other hand, sometimes the process is very conscious. More than once I’ve been called to visit a man or woman who has called the parish office specifically because they know they are dying and they want to see a Catholic priest.

So I once made my way to a small apartment in a not so good part of town. I was admitted to find a man in his sixties with a haggard expression gasping for air. Call him Ralph.

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Priest recommends dangerous practice of making a written list of one’s sins, prior to confession.

confessionlist

by Doug Lawrence

In a recent article, 10 Tips on How to Confess Well Fr. Ed Broom offers a number of useful tips for making a good confession – but one of the suggestions is dangerous, because it can easily lead to a violation of the “seal” of absolute confidentiality of the sacrament of reconciliation – and cause a host of other, totally unnecessary problems, as well.

According to the article, it is suggested that we should “Write down the sins so that you will not forget them once in the confessional!”

Let’s consider all the things that might happen to a written list of sins from the night before, when a complete examination of conscience might have been done – through the actual confession – and afterwards.

Unless you happen to be a hermit, living on a mountain top, or in a cave, and the priest is coming to you – and your list of sins will be dropped into a fire and be instantly destroyed – you run a substantial risk of someone – anyone – happening across your list – learning all the details of your particular sins – and violating one of the most important aspects of the sacrament.

Understanding that the seal of the confessional is binding not only on the priest, but also on any other Catholic who might inadvertently learn of your sins – by whatever means –  it’s clear that putting such things down in writing is often dangerous – and generally foolish.

If the list was misplaced or somehow misappropriated – intentionally or otherwise – and the information was subsequently disseminated to others – a number of very negative consequences might result. Here’s just a few of the many possibilities. (If you happen to be a politician, a used car salesman, or a bishop, please pay close attention):

The priest might be wrongly accused of violating the seal of the confessional.

Family or friends might come into possession of the list – before or after the confession – and discover certain things that they should not know. (Did you ever leave something in the pocket of your shirt or pants, and it ended up in the wash?)

Business associates and/or others – particularly your enemies – might come into possession of the list – in which case the possibilities for gossip and other mischief – including blackmail – are virtually without limits.

You might get arrested and subsequently carted off to jail. 

Your list might become a near occasion of grave sin – for some yet unknown individual.

You might suddenly begin attract new – and unwanted – friends and followers. 

You may find your personal list of sins “Trending Now” on the World Wide Web/Internet.

The entire parish/neighborhood might soon know all about your innermost thoughts and personal weaknesses.

There is also a very real possibility that your friends, family and others could be caught up in any ensuing scandal.

In the confessional, most priests will ask whether you are truly sorry for “these and all your sins” – and that ought to cover anything you have genuinely forgotten to confess. Should some unconfessed sin come to mind at another time, simply confess it at your earliest convenience. God isn’t looking to trip you up!

In these days of information piracy and other forms of electronic mischief – leading to identity theft and all types of related problems – the last thing you need to do is go around making written lists of all the grave sins you have committed – especially since they might somehow end up on Facebook or Twitter, before you know it.

I suggest you do your best to frequently make a good confession – by memory. Treat such information much as you would your social security number and credit card data – taking steps to make absolutely certain it doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. Otherwise, you risk very serious, unforeseen  and totally unnecessary consequences – which were never intended to be a part of the sacrament of reconciliation.

How God can bring about good, even in the wake of unspeakable evil.

Once upon a time, I went to church every Sunday. I went to Catholic school — St. Stephen in Hamden. But as high school wore on, I attended Mass less and less. Eventually, my participation was reduced to the holidays — Christmas morning and Easter Sunday, maybe the odd Mass in between. In the past few years, I’ve abandoned even the holidays, leaving me agnostic at best.

But on Saturday, I was assigned to cover a Mass at St. Rose of Lima Church, a Catholic church in Newtown.

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Why it was necessary for God to send his son into the world, as a man, to save us.

bethl6enhc

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

457     The Word became flesh for us in order to save us by reconciling us with God, who “loved us and sent his Son to be the expiation for our sins”: “the Father has sent his Son as the Savior of the world”, and “he was revealed to take away sins”:

Sick, our nature demanded to be healed; fallen, to be raised up; dead, to rise again. We had lost the possession of the good; it was necessary for it to be given back to us. Closed in the darkness, it was necessary to bring us the light; captives, we awaited a Savior; prisoners, help; slaves, a liberator. Are these things minor or insignificant? Did they not move God to descend to human nature and visit it, since humanity was in so miserable and unhappy a state?

458     The Word became flesh so that thus we might know God’s love: “In this the love of God was made manifest among us, that God sent his only Son into the world, so that we might live through him.” “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.”

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Divine Mercy Celebration at Our Lady of Peace – Darien, IL – Sunday – April 15, 2012

Our Lady of Peace Parish
701 W. Plainfield Road
Darien, IL 60559

1:30 – 2:45 pm Confessions (resume at 4:00pm)
It is not possible for everyone to go to confession on the same day.
As Fr. Seraphim, MIC has said: “God will not ask us to do the impossible”.
We should be preparing for the Feast of Mercy
during the whole season of Lent,
and we should make our confession even before Holy Week.
To gain grace, one should make a good confession
within the week of the Divine Mercy Feast Day.

1:30 pm Video “Time for Mercy” Video in School Gym
Find out ……
– The origin of the devotion
– Jesus’ message to St. Faustina
– How this devotion impacts our world today

3:00 – 4:00 pm Hour of Great Mercy
– Exposition
– Chaplet of The Divine Mercy
– Benediction
– Blessing of Religious Articles
– Veneration of St. Faustina’s relic

1:30 & 4 – 5 pm Gift shop open in school lobby

“Jesus, I Trust In You!”

Submitted by Heidi B.

An open letter to “ex” Catholics – wherever they might be

by Doug Lawrence

Dear “Ex”,

There’s no such thing as an “ex” Catholic. When you were baptized you became an adopted child of God, a living temple of the Holy Spirit, a citizen of Heaven, co-heir with Jesus Christ, and a member of the church.

Your immortal soul received a special, indelible mark, identifying you as one of God’s very own. You also received a number of unique rights and privileges, the most important of which is the right to expect God to freely accept all your prayers and petitions.

None of this was merely temporary, or subject to revocation.

The corruption and hypocrisy of some who lead the church is shameful and scandalous, yet such things should no more keep you from being authentically Catholic than corrupt politicians and congressmen should keep you from being authentically American.

The most important thing at stake is the eternal salvation of your own personal soul, and for that you need to fully and faithfully participate in all of the work, worship, sacraments and devotions of the Catholic Church … the only church that Jesus Christ ever founded … for that express purpose.

If you’re old enough and intelligent enough to post opinion pieces on the internet, you’re old enough and intelligent enough to satisfactorily work through adult questions of faith, without merely throwing up your hands and walking away.

In any case, God loves you, and God will provide … but things begin to look much, much better once you take the time to discern your proper place in the whole scheme of things, stand up for God’s honest truth, and begin to properly pursue the high purpose for which you were created.

Of course, none of that really matters if you remain estranged and/or separated from Christ and his church.

There has always been a direct relationship between corruption in the church and the need for authentic, faithful Catholicity. The more corrupt the church evidently appears … the more good, faithful, well informed, mature Catholics are needed … in order to help turn things around.

I suspect the problem you have with the Catholic church is actually rooted some intractable, personal moral issue … and not something that is specific to any of the current public scandals. If that’s true, then you’re in denial and the only real barrier to effective reconciliation is your own personal pride.

When dealing with things of God, its typically left up to us mortals to first apologize and then ask forgiveness. Catholics … including voluntarily separated ones … typically accomplish that by going to confession, after which the subject will necessarily, never be brought up again. I speak from personal experience.

God is good. His Catholic Church is troubled, but still quite capable of saving souls and ministering to all the needs of the faithful, and Jesus Christ specifically set things up that way, just for you. Why not give it one more try?

If today you hear God’s voice, harden not your heart.

Love,

Doug

Just about everything any Catholic needs to know about the great sacrament that’s still often referred to as “Confession”

Are all of our sins—past, present, and future—forgiven once and for all when we become Christians? Not according to the Bible or the early Church Fathers. Scripture nowhere states that our future sins are forgiven; instead, it teaches us to pray, “And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors” (Matt. 6:12).

The means by which God forgives sins after baptism is confession: “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9). Minor or venial sins can be confessed directly to God, but for grave or mortal sins, which crush the spiritual life out of the soul, God has instituted a different means for obtaining forgiveness—the sacrament known popularly as confession, penance, or reconciliation.

This sacrament is rooted in the mission God gave to Christ in his capacity as the Son of man on earth to go and forgive sins (cf. Matt. 9:6). Thus, the crowds who witnessed this new power “glorified God, who had given such authority to men” (Matt. 9:8; note the plural “men”). After his resurrection, Jesus passed on his mission to forgive sins to his ministers, telling them, “As the Father has sent me, even so I send you. . . . Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained” (John 20:21–23).

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Submitted by Doria2

Seen on the web: Dealing with habitual and persistent grave sin and/or demonic activity.

Editor’s note: This posts reflects someone’s personal observations/opinion and/or belief, regarding certain types of demonic activity. That matter remains open to discussion.  The suggested solution though, is time tested, totally Catholic, and according to my knowledge and experience, highly effective. Demons … or not!

Bible Reader wrote:

I believe that (these) demons are quite real, and that people generate them, as poltergeist-like entities able to invade and affect our reality, when people engage in persistent illicit sexual activity. The activity which generates these things is usually habitual and persistent. If the wrongdoer is Catholic, sacrilegious abuse of the Sacraments of Reconciliation (by omitting discussion of the true level of guilt) and of the Eucharist (by knowingly receiving Communion in the state of mortal sin) also generates the demonic presence.

Demonic activity tends to be imitative. It tends to imitate Christ or Mary or the saints to poke fun at them, or it imitates the sinner whose sins generated the presence, to poke fun at the sinner.

So, serious sex-related sins generate a sexual demonic presence. [Of course, a demonic presence does NOT necessarily mean fornication with a “spiritual, non-corporeal being” cf. CCC 328. S.O.L.!]

In a sense, when the demonic presence appears, as a consequence, it is like a phonograph record re-playing the sins which generated it, again and again and again.

The presences are sometimes invasive — if you don’t do something about them, they can get worse and worse and worse.

The sinner with the demonic presence can take heart in a few things. First, I think that God permits such presences because the person is able to be saved. The person is being warned, “Hey! Hell is a reality, you idiot, and that is where you are going unless you change!” It is Paul’s “thorn in the flesh.” See 2 Corinthians 12:7.

Second, though they are subjectively difficult for the sinner to eliminate, they are objectively easy to eliminate.

If we are talking about a sex sin underlying the presence — and we undoubtedly are — the individual must begin by “starving” the presence to death. Stop sinning. This works because the thing “eats dirt” — see Genesis 3:14 — sin is its “nutrition.” Sin energizes it. Pray to God for the will to stop sinning. He will give it to you. If we are talking about sex sin, here — and we undoubtedly are — the sinner should stop looking. Sexual coveting almost always precedes sexual sin.

Search for and find a good confessor, who you can trust, and “let it all hang out” in a special Reconciliation session. Most priests can’t take something as bizarre as a sexual demonic presence beside your bed, grabbing you at night, imitating your sex sounds. It is just too outstandingly weird. You really do need to prep the priest for what he is in for, in your confession, and also get him to know you, so that he doesn’t “freak-out” on you or conclude that you are insane.

Go to Communion frequently, even daily, after the sincere confession, and pray, pray, pray, pray, pray. And when you pray, don’t just roll-out incessant Hail Mary’s and Our Father’s — TALK to God, and to Mary.

The sacraments and prayer will make you holy, and make your person intolerable to the demon. YOU will become HIS “demon,” and eventually HE’LL find YOU disgusting, and leave.

If you ask God to let you hear the demon’s departure, He will do so. It feels and sounds like an explosion.

I know that some of the readers here will think this material outstandingly weird. It’s what I have learned, after 30 years of reading, talking, etc., etc., etc.
__________

Link

The Six Precepts of the Catholic Church

1.  To respectfully and devoutly assist at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass on all Sundays and Holydays of Obligation.

 2.  To fast and abstain on the days appointed.

 3.  To go to Confession at least once a year during the Easter Season.

 4.  To receive the Sacrament of the Most Holy Eucharist at least once a year during the Easter Season.

 5.  To contribute financially (i.e. give money) to the support of the Catholic Church.

 6. To never violate the laws concerning the Sacrament of Matrimony.

Why frequent reception of the Sacrament of Penance can work miracles.


Romans 6:14  For sin shall not have dominion over you:
for you are not under the law, but under grace.

Grace is the currency of Heaven … and it’s also the way God enables, empowers, and sanctifies those who love him.

Probably one of the most under-appreciated aspects of the Sacrament of Reconciliation is the fact that (like all sacraments) it infuses abundant grace into the soul.

How much grace?

For the sake of argument, let’s call it “enough to replace all that had been lost, through sin … plus a little more.”

What does this mean, for Catholics who are seriously pursuing personal holiness, conversion, and ultimate perfection in Jesus Christ?

Every time you make a good confession … no matter how grievously you might have offended God … you leave … absolved of all your sins … but also with (at least) a little more grace in your soul … than you ever had before.

Imagine what would happen,
if every time you went to the bank,
you left with more money in your account
than when you went in!

Scripture informs us that God has always empowered the weak and the infirm in this way:

2Corinthians 12:9  And he said to me:
My grace is sufficient for thee:
for power is made perfect in infirmity.
Gladly therefore will I glory in my infirmities,
that the power of Christ may dwell in me.

Regularly presenting ourselves before the Lord, through the Sacrament of Reconciliation, serves to empower us to overcome any and all of our human infirmities (spiritual weaknesses, and even physical illnesses) through the sufficiency of God’s abundant grace.

Accepting this fact and acting on it (in humility and faith) not only keeps the forces of the world, the flesh, and the devil under control … but it is a sure and certain way to please God … since it also keeps us perfectly centered in his will … and his plan.

It doesn’t get any better than that, this side of Heaven!

Based on all of this, how often should a Catholic go to confession? Probably a lot more often than we do!

Related article

The Catholic priest and confession

Just as he does at the altar where he celebrates the Eucharist and at each one of the sacraments the priest, as the minister of penance, works “in persona Christi”.

The Christ whom he gives and makes present, and who by means of his ministry effects the remission of sins is with the priest, who appears as a brother of man, a merciful bridge-builder, faithful and compassionate pastor dedicated to search for the lost sheep, the doctor who heals and comforts, the one teacher who teaches the truth and teaches the ways of God, who judges the living and the dead and judges according to the truth and not according to appearances.

Read more from Pope John Paul II

This Week’s Ask Alice: Important things to keep in mind when visiting non-Catholic websites.


Send A Question To Alice

She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Jola Writes: This site, http://www.gotquestions.org, has some interesting subjects, particularly on Catholic things, like going to confession. It may inspire you, possibly?  They seem to have an answer for everything !!!

Alice Answers: “GotQuestions.org” is a Protestant website. Its homepage explains that the statements about Catholicism were written by FORMER Catholics. Consequently, the opinions of these lapsed Catholic volunteers are not consistent with authentic Catholic beliefs, teachings and practices … particularly about the Sacrament of Penance … and they reflect an often subtle, yet consistent, anti-Catholic bias on most other things, as well.

Catholics must confess their sins to a priest because Jesus instituted the sacrament of Penance, which gave His apostles (and their duly ordained successors) the power to forgive sins: “If you forgive men’s sins, they are forgiven them; if you hold them bound, they are held bound.” (John 20:23)

Jesus also gave priests the authority to reconcile sinners with the Church: “All this has been done by God, who has reconciled himself to us through Christ and has given us the ministry of reconciliation.” (2 Corinthians 5:18)

The apostles were our first priests. Jesus instituted the sacraments of Holy Orders (the priesthood) and Holy Eucharist on Holy Thursday, at the Last Supper.

Sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? Then why does the Protestant website you cited, deny the need to confess one’s sins to a priest?

Most Protestants do not believe in an ordained priesthood, nor do they believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

Our Catholic religion is the oldest and ONLY Christian Church that was ever personally founded by Jesus Christ, while he still walked the earth, some 2000 years ago.

The oldest Protestant denomination was founded 1517 years later by Martin Luther, an excommunicated priest who broke away from the Catholic Church, to start his own religion.

Methodists, Baptists and Presbyterians are splinter groups that broke away from the Lutheran religion, while Catholicism is the only religion that maintains an unbroken line all the way back to Jesus Christ. This is known as “apostolic succession”, while the divine truths that have been faithfully handed down to us Catholics from Jesus and the apostles, are known as “the sacred deposit of faith”.

Only Catholics can trace our faith directly to Jesus Christ, who appointed St. Peter as His earthly successor, the Pope. By contrast, Martin Luther, John Wesley, John Smyth and John Knox are founders of modern, novel, Protestant religions, which do not recognize the Catholic hierarchy of the Pope, bishops and priests, and which also deny or misconstrue many other eternal, Christian truths.

Since Protestants do not have ordained priests, they also reject previously mentioned Biblical passages about confessing sins to a priest (as well as a host of other things.) In short, they simply choose to interpret the Scriptures differently than Catholics, based on purely personal beliefs and feelings, a state which is manifest today by many thousands of different denominations.

Meanwhile, in spite of recent difficulties, Catholics continue to confess one creed, and faithfully participate in the one, holy, universal and apostolic church of Jesus Christ. Why? St. Peter probably explained it best:  “And Simon Peter answered him: Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life.” (John 6:68)

We are called to love our Protestant brothers and sisters in Christ, with whom we one day hope to be united in Heaven. Until then, we probably shouldn’t waste too much time arguing over doctrinal differences, but instead, spend each day focused on loving one another.

We should also be eternally grateful that our Catholic Church contains the fullest possible measure of all God’s grace and truth.

Jola, you were wise in choosing this authentically Catholic website, “Ask Me About God” to answer your question.

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Why do you say God is going to make my life better if I believe? It doesn’t say that anywhere in the Bible.

Q: Why do you say God is going to make my life better if I believe? It doesn’t say that anywhere in the Bible. Did you not read what God did to his people? He punished them, over and over. Please answer.

A: Throughout Old Testament times, virtually all of mankind was fighting on the side of Satan the Devil, in active revolt against God. And since (at that time) Satan was the acknowledged “Prince of this world” there was nothing that mankind (alone) could ever do, to change things.

Mankind was truly enslaved to Satan, sin, and death … and since Satan hated both God and man … and he held the power of death over us … Satan had absolutely no concerns about the levels of casualties that might be suffered.

The various punishments you mention are all part of this long-running war against God … a war led by Satan, a fallen angel, who obtained certain dominion over mankind through stealthy deception, and by way of Adam’s original sin.

This was permitted to happen, but it certainly was not what God originally intended for us … so … in the fullness of time … God sent his son Jesus … to destroy Satan’s evil power, to end the war, and to reconcile mankind with God.

That’s why, on the first Christmas, the angels proclaimed, “Glory to God in the highest: and on Earth, peace to men of good will.”

Now … thanks to Jesus’ life, his atoning death on the cross, his resurrection … and through the good offices, work, worship, sacraments and devotions of his authentic (Catholic) Church … Satan’s evil dominion has been destroyed … Jesus is the new, divine, holy, perfect and eternal head of all mankind … and those who choose to swear faithful allegiance to Jesus Christ are no longer at war with God.

Instead, they have become God’s adopted sons and daughters, Temples of the Holy Spirit, Citizens of Heaven, and Co-Heirs with Jesus Christ, who promises to shower them (forever) with all of God’s superabundant love and blessings.

This is the “Good News” of the New Testament … the true message of the Gospels … and it is a message of reconciliation, of grace, hope, faith, and peace.

The “Good News” of Jesus Christ has forever blotted out the terror of those “bad old days”. It’s a shame that most people have never had this explained to them, since it’s very difficult to come to know and love God, when you’re afraid of him!

It’s also why we can truthfully say,“God Loves You. God Will Provide. Relax!” (Our site’s motto.)

I explained all this (and more) in my book, “The Passion Behind the Passion” which is available to be read for free, on-line. Click here to go there.

It’s an easy read. I suggest you take a look at it, when you can. Just start at the beginning and follow along until you find what you’re looking for.

Feel free to email, with any additional questions.

I’m also going to forward your question to Alice, our advice columnist, so you can see what she thinks about these things.

Look for her answer to appear on the website, in next Thursday’s column.

In the mean time, in Jesus’ holy name, we wish you a very Merry Christmas, and a happy, holy New Year!

God Bless You,

Doug

The Basis For All Seven Sacraments Can Be Found In the Bible

Baptism in Holy Scripture

Mt. 3:1-17: 1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judea, 2 “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” 3 For this is he who was spoken of by the prophet Isaiah when he said, “The voice of one crying in the wilderness: Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” 4 Now John wore a garment of camel’s hair, and a leather girdle around his waist; and his food was locusts and wild honey. 5 Then went out to him Jerusalem and all Judea and all the region about the Jordan, 6 and they were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. 7  But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming for baptism, he said to them, “You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? 8 Bear fruit that befits repentance, 9 and do not presume to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father’; for I tell you, God is able from these stones to raise up children to Abraham. 10 Even now the axe is laid to the root of the trees; every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 11 “I baptize you with water for repentance, but he who is coming after me is mightier than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry; he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and with fire. 12 His winnowing fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing floor and gather his wheat into the granary, but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.” 13 Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to John, to be baptized by him. 14 John would have prevented him, saying, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” 15 But Jesus answered him, “Let it be so now; for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he consented. 16 And when Jesus was baptized, he went up immediately from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened  and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and alighting on him; 17 and lo, a voice from heaven, saying, “This is my beloved Son,  with whom I am well pleased.”

Mt. 28:16-20: 16 Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. 17 And when they saw him they worshipped him; but some doubted. 18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age.”

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Yahweh’s Savior


When Yahweh, (I AM) the Eternal God, who knows the end from the beginning, chose to create all things, He knew that man would sin (separating himself from God).

He also knew that, left to our own devices, mankind would never be able to make things right again.

We would need a Redeemer or Savior to make it possible for us to overcome sin and its’ main consequence, death. Only then could we once again hope to dwell eternally in the presence of the Most High God.

To qualify as Redeemer, one would need to possess a dual nature that was both human and divine. The Savior would also have to be impeccable, (without sin of any kind) completely innocent of any transgressions against God or man.

(The Council of Trent declares that since Jesus Christ is God, it is impossible for him to commit sin.)


One more thing; the Redeemer would need to die, to voluntarily lay down His life to satisfy a debt that He didn’t owe, the debt of sin that mankind could never pay.

Recognizing our need for such a One, God chose to send us His only begotten Son.

Just as people bring forth (beget) children who are made of the same human “stuff” they are, so the Son of God was begotten of the divine Person of the Father. God from God, Light from Light, True God from True God. The literal expression of God’s love and the image of His Father, our Redeemer is not a created being.

He, like His Father, is God eternal. Through Him, all things were made and through Him, all things have been reconciled in heaven and on earth.

Scripture tells us that our Redeemer is the sacrificial Lamb slain before the foundation of the world.


For the salvation of mankind He came down from heaven. Divinely conceived, He was born of the Virgin Mary and became one of us, in all things except for sin. He lived a life of virtue; full of grace and truth. He never sinned. He worked numerous miracles and revealed many of God’s secrets.

Most importantly, He told us about God, His Father (and ours). Then, He suffered and died on the cross for us, so that we might have eternal life.

By His own power, He rose from the dead. Though He is God, He did all this in the flesh, in an ordinary human body, taking upon Himself every human limitation (except for sin).

By His life and example He showed mankind the way to heaven. He conquered sin for us by being totally obedient to the will of His Father. He overcame death for us by His glorious resurrection.


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Redemption
Atonement

Get in … Confess … Get absolved … Get Out. See a spiritual director some other time.

Father Z shares some tips for going to confession (courteously and efficiently).

Link

Young priest says he knows the promise of the spirit is true, because he’s experienced reconciliation in his own life.

Father Rob Spaulding, a new priest in the diocese of Cheyenne, Wyoming, was a seminarian when his life was changed forever. After having a few drinks with three fellow seminarians, Rob was nominated to drive the group home — but he lost control of the car and crashed, ultimately killing two of the passengers, Jared Cheek and Matty Molnar.

It’s a terrible story that is sadly too common, but what happened next is anything but:

Read more at Inside Catholic