The riches of Jesus Christ are communicated to all the members of the Church, through the sacraments.

consecration

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

946     After confessing “the holy catholic Church,” the Apostles’ Creed adds “the communion of saints.” In a certain sense this article is a further explanation of the preceding: “What is the Church if not the assembly of all the saints?” The communion of saints is the Church.

947     “Since all the faithful form one body, the good of each is communicated to the others. … We must therefore believe that there exists a communion of goods in the Church. But the most important member is Christ, since he is the head. … Therefore, the riches of Christ are communicated to all the members, through the sacraments.” “As this Church is governed by one and the same Spirit, all the goods she has received necessarily become a common fund.”

948     The term “communion of saints” therefore has two closely linked meanings: communion in holy things (sancta)” and “among holy persons (sancti).”

Sancta sanctis! (“God’s holy gifts for God’s holy people”) is proclaimed by the celebrant in most Eastern liturgies during the elevation of the holy Gifts before the distribution of communion. The faithful (sancti) are fed by Christ’s holy body and blood (sancta) to grow in the communion of the Holy Spirit (koinonia) and to communicate it to the world.

Read more

Seen on the web: In the “world” the pauper is a nobody, lower than everyone else, but in a Catholic Church he is just like everyone else and he gets to be surrounded by all the wealth of beauty that others experience every day.

Posted by mk on Monday, May 7, 2012 8:05 AM (EST):

Someone (Maybe Dorothy Day?) once said that all that lavishness was the great equalizer.  It didn’t matter if you were poor, orphaned, black, white, a leper…no matter who you were, what circumstances you came from, when you walked into a Catholic Church, you were experiencing what it felt to be a “King”.  Even a pauper could experience great art, music, etc.  In the “world” the pauper is a nobody, lower than everyone else, but in a Catholic Church he is just like everyone else and he gets to be surrounded by all the wealth of beauty that others experience every day.

Link

But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent his Son, made of a woman, made under the law: That he might redeem them who were under the law: that we might receive the adoption of sons.

And because you are sons, God hath sent the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying: Abba, Father.

Therefore, now he is not a servant, but a son. And if a son, an heir also through God.   (Galatians 4:4-7)

By virtue of our baptism, we become adopted sons and daughters of God … co-heirs with Jesus Christ to all that is good … on Earth and in Heaven … including the Catholic Church.

The richness of the Catholic Church properly reflects the richness of our faith … and also gives us some sense of the infinite beauty and Heavenly majesty of the one, true God … to whom we belong. – Doug