Sorry Ma’am … Ain’t no such thing as women priests in the Catholic Church!

The Roman Catholic Church does not ordain women.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church is very clear on this issue. As it states in the Catechism, #1577: “Only a baptized man validly receives sacred ordination. The Lord Jesus chose men to form the college of the twelve apostles, and the apostles did the same when they chose collaborators to succeed them in their ministry. The college of bishops, with whom the priests are united in the priesthood, makes the college of the twelve an ever-present and ever-active reality until Christ’s return. The Church recognizes herself to be bound by this choice made by the Lord himself. For this reason the ordination of women is not possible.”

The ordination of men to the priesthood is not merely a matter of practice or discipline with the Catholic Church, but rather, it is part of the deposit of faith handed down by Christ through his apostles. The Catholic Church has always followed Jesus’ example and does not believe it has the authority to change what Jesus instituted. The will of Christ is not arbitrary.

The woman who attempted ordination this past weekend may have chosen to be a priest in some other “catholic” church but it is not the one headed by Pope Benedict XVI. She cannot be a priest in a church that has not called her to that priesthood.

She herself states that by attempting ordination and denying the Roman Catholic Church’s teaching in a public act, she has placed herself outside of the Church’s communion. This offers further argument against her “ordination” since to be ordained to the sacred priesthood is to be ordained to obedience in mind and soul to the Church’s magisterium.  One cannot serve in obedience if one was ordained in an act of disobedience.

The Catholic Church’s teaching on the ordination of women does not mean that the Church values women less than men. The Catholic Church is sustained by the important contributions of women each and every day. The Catholic Church has always taught that men and women have the same dignity, but they have different duties or gifts. All these gifts are central to the faith and the life of the Catholic Church.

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Editor’s note: It’s time this type of prideful play acting came to a stop. The Catholic Church has an exclusive and absolute right to decide who it accepts into the priesthood, and it does not need to justify its actions to anyone.

These women do a service to no one, and serve merely to the sow confusion in the Body of Christ. There’s way too much of that going around, already!

Pope names 24 new Cardinals


Here, the biglietto, in order:

  • Angelo Amato, prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints;
  • Antonio Naguib, patriarch of Alexandria of the Copts,
  • Robert Sarah, president of the Pontifical Council Cor Unum,
  • Francesco Monterisi, archpriest of St Paul’s Outside the Walls,
  • Fortunato Baldelli, major penitentiary of the Roman church,
  • Raymond Burke, prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura,
  • Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity
  • Paolo Sardi, pro-Patron of the Order of Malta,
  • Mauro Piacenza, prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy
  • Velasio DePaolis CS, prefect for the Economic Affairs of the Holy See (& papal delegate to the Legionaries of Christ)
  • Gianfranco Ravasi, president of the Pontifical Council for Culture
  • Medardo Joseph Mazombwe, archbishop-emeritus of Lusaka (Zambia)
  • Raul Eduardo Vela Chiliboga, archbishop-emeritus of Quito (Ecuador)
  • Laurent Monsengwo Pasinya, archbishop of Kinshasa
  • Paolo Romeo, archbishop of Palermo
  • Donald Wuerl, archbishop of Washington
  • Raymundo Damasceno Assis, archbishop of Aparecida
  • Kazmierz Nycz, archbishop of Warsaw
  • Malcolm Ranjith, archbishop of Colombo
  • Reinhard Marx, archbishop of Munich and Freising

…and the over 80s:

  • Archbishop Jose Manuel Estepa Llaurens, Military Ordinary-emeritus of Spain
  • Bishop Elio Sgreccia, president-emeritus of the Pontifical Academy for Life
  • Msgr Walter Brandmuller, president-emeritus of the Pontifical Commission for Historical Sciences
  • Msgr Domenico Bartolucci, director-emeritus of the Sistine Choir

Link

Interesting facts about Cardinals

The “Catholic Reformed Church”?


Catholics born in the 40’s and 50’s can well remember the confidence they once knew in a Church that, like Christ Himself, would be the same today, tomorrow and forever. The Mass was the rock, offered by priests who faced God in the tabernacle, exactly as priests had done for a thousand years and throughout the whole world; Mass was heard and seen and prayed exactly as every saint, martyr and pope had heard and seen and prayed it back to the days of the Apostles.

For Catholics—not just in the Middle Ages, but in living memory—the Holy Father was infallible, the Mass was in Latin, the priest was in the confessional, scapular enrollment was universal, rosaries were lifelines, nuns were in cloisters and classrooms, mothers were in the homes, families were made up of numerous children, Christ was in the tabernacle, and the Catholic Church was the shining city on the hill.

And then one day it all blew up—sabotaged not by a visible invading army but by forces from within who thought they knew better. The Mass of all time was thrown out and replaced by something utterly foreign to every Catholic who’d ever lived. The nuns threw off their habits and became agents for “social justice”. The priests rejected the sacrificial symbols of their holy office and became our buddies. Women invaded the sanctuaries while men abandoned the pews. The seminaries and churches became laboratories for pop theology and experimental psychology. Catholics had declared war on themselves.

If you wanted to pass out Holy Communion, reject Humanae Vitae, hold hands at the Our Father, shake hands at the kiss of peace, or belt out the latest ditty that’d replaced Sacred Music—you could stay on. But if you didn’t want all that, but preferred instead to continue to practice the Faith as you’d been taught in Catholic school and as your father and mother had always done, you had to make sure not to let the door hit you in the backside on your way out.

Some stayed and suffered like Magdalene beneath the Cross. Others went along with the madness. Most walked away, never to return. And today much of the remnant of the Catholic faithful is either white-haired and fading away or, bereft of any Catholic identity whatsoever, cheering on Nancy Pelosi and Barack Obama.

Young people from the best families may continue going to Mass for a few years, at least until they’re 16 or so. They may even show up for weekend retreats and overnights when the idea of getting out of the house on their own is still appealing. But soon enough all too many of them will join the rest of the “Catholic Christian” community today that quite simply is losing the Faith. If they’re unfortunate enough to attend a Catholic college or university, it’s a slam dunk!

According to a new poll conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life forty-five percent of Roman Catholics don’t even know that the consecrated bread and wine of Holy Communion is not just a symbol, but becomes the actual Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.

Clearly, the fort has been betrayed.

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Submitted by Doria2

Hundreds of traditionalist clergy poised to leave Church of England for Rome.

Evidently, women priests and openly homosexual bishops have so strained the sensibilities of traditional Anglicans that the thought of women bishops is just a bit too much.

Read the story

Why Some Take the Path From Anglican to Catholic

To the Editor:

Re “For an Episcopal Parish, a Path to Catholicism” (Rosemont Journal, Oct. 25):

I am the former curate referred to in your article about the Church of the Good Shepherd, Rosemont, as one who had already left the Anglican parish to become Roman Catholic.

The article describes Anglicans attracted to Rome as being against women’s and homosexual ordinations. But this does not describe the real motivation for why priests like me reconcile with the Roman Catholic Church.

The main issue is the fact that the Anglican Church has no consistent doctrinal authority and often acts independently from the historical positions of the universal church. In light of this, the ordination of women and practicing homosexuals is merely symptomatic of much more fundamental problems with Anglican ecclesiology.

Priests like me are not reacting to polemics on the theological spectrum. It is the faith once delivered that we are after, which we pursue as an imperative of conscience.

Albert Scharbach
Baltimore, Oct. 28, 2009

The writer is pastoral assistant to Bishop Denis J. Madden of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

Link to original New York Times article

From the Opinion section of the New York Times

Seen on the web: Comment about the Catholic Church

This is from a cradle-Catholic, on her way to 82 years old.

There have been many changes in the Roman Catholic Church since I was carried there to be baptized many, many years ago. Some of these changes were mind-boggling to me at the time, but the church changed, nonetheless.

It boggles the mind to imagine the changes that will come to the church in the next 80+ years. God be with it. I loved the church of my youth, and I love the church of today. How can I not? The church has forgiven me, how can i not forgive the church. Thanks be to God.

— gep