It’s time to unleash the awesome power of the Roman Missal on Obama and his minions.


by Doug Lawrence

OK. We’ve now heard pretty much all the original rhetoric we’re likely to hear … from both sides.

More than half of the U.S. bishops have spoken out. The Catholic left and the Catholic right are in agreement for the first time in almost 50 years, yet Obama and his minions still fail to see the problem with their abominable HHS abortion/contraception mandate.

No more dialogue. It’s time we Catholics unleashed the awesome power of the Roman Missal on Obama and his minions. They have absolutely no defense against this universal weapon of mass devotion.

In the name of Jesus Christ, let the blood flow! The battle is already won. May God have mercy on their souls (and ours)!

Strategy and tactics

Schematics and technical details

Historical precedent

Photo: http://www.dudziak.com/

Wave bye-bye to poor Fr. Bill, who liked to say Mass in his own words.

“The problem is that when I pray at Mass, I tend to change the words that are written in the book to match what I was talking about, or what a song is about,” Rowe said in an interview.

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New Mass Translation: All over but the shouting.

There will certainly be challenges with the new translation for everyone. For instance, “And with your spirit” is not idiomatic, nor is the word “consubstantial” familiar to most parishioners. But we all know what the real disagreements will be. There is an online petition asking the Bishops not to demand the use of the new translation, and in the comments you can see the points of contention.

There is, of course, the procedural argument: The change is being imposed from above and does not reflect the views of the laity because it was not produced by a democratic process. This is the constant tension over the hierarchy. But there is also a theological argument, a dispute over what the language is for. According to one South African Bishop, the very reason for the new translation was based, among other things, upon “a purely arbitrary decision to demand that the English text had to faithfully represent the Latin . . .” Well, quite.

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The New Missal: Language of the Mass

Visit the Archdiocese of Baltimore website

New Liturgy translation ‘suprisingly good’

When judging the process devised by the Congregation for Divine Worship, however, most people will focus on its success in producing good texts that are happily received by clergy and laity. A tacit consensus has emerged that the consultation and transparency central to due process have been lacking, and that this lack has diminished the quality of the work and the good will necessary for its implementation.

Judgments about the quality of translations are inevitably subjective. Commentators tend to compare the best bits of the version they applaud with the worst bits of the versions they dislike.

My own judgment, based on a limited reading, is that, considering the narrow instructions governing its preparation, the new translation overall is surprisingly good. In less skilled hands the result could have resembled Inspector Poirot’s English. In fact it reads more like the English used in costume drama — workable, but with a slightly archaic and formal flavor. It demands that the celebrant slow down and settle into period. It also supposes relatively high linguistic skills in its audience.

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Concerned about upcoming changes to the Mass …

Q: I am not so excited about changing the Mass. Forty years of hearing Mass in English is tradition to me.  People think changes will give more meaning to them. “‘What can the church do for us?’ has to be changed to ‘What can we do for our parish?’

A: The changes that are coming up next year are (virtually) all in English. They are just corrections to the very sloppy, rush job that was done in the 60’s. No big deal to learn.

As for the Latin Mass … some people like it. Some don’t. I appreciate both.

Any time Jesus becomes present on the altar for us, so we can worship God through him, with him, in him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, (and that happens in every approved and faithfully conducted Mass liturgy) I have no complaints.

The problem lies in the fact that people fail to understand the reason and purpose of the Mass … so they fail to fully participate in the church … and they subsequently miss out on all or most of the grace that’s necessary to accomplish the things that you mention. That same weakness is manifest is the many liturgical abuses … which have become so common, as to be almost expected.

John 15:1-7 I am the true vine: and my Father is the husbandman.  Every branch in me that beareth not fruit, he will take away: and every one that beareth fruit, he will purge it, that it may bring forth more fruit.  Now you are clean, by reason of the word which I have spoken to you. Abide in me: and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abide in the vine, so neither can you, unless you abide in me. I am the vine: you the branches. He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit: for without me you can do nothing.  If any one abide not in me, he shall be cast forth as a branch and shall wither: and they shall gather him up and cast him into the fire: and he burneth. If you abide in me and my words abide in you, you shall ask whatever you will: and it shall be done unto you.

It’s virtually impossible to abide in Jesus Christ without full, faithful and regular participation in the Mass and the sacraments.

If the sacred liturgy fails to “deliver” a clear and truthful “message” then the mission of the church is easily compromised and/or watered down. That’s pretty much what happened during the last 40 years.

So … weak, confused liturgy makes for weak, confused Catholics … while solid, authentic liturgy makes for solid, well-informed Catholics … and that’s pretty much the whole point.

Pope Benedict (when he was younger, as a priest and bishop) is largely responsible for the “Spirit of Vatican II” that led to many of the liturgical abuses and other wacky innovations, so now that he’s pope, it’s nice to see him trying to fix some of the messes he helped to make.

Perhaps you missed this article on the Mass changes that I posted, a while back. You can read all of  the changes, word-for word.

Submitted by Marcia C.

Vatican/USCCB ramp up efforts to launch new Roman Missal

WASHINGTON — After a decade of work, the greatest liturgical milestone for American Catholics since the 1970s is right around the corner: The Vatican has approved a new English translation of the Roman Missal, and the U.S. bishops have fixed the roll-out date in the nation’s parishes for the beginning of Advent 2011.

“The use of the third edition of the Roman Missal enters into use in the dioceses of the United States of America as of the First Sunday of Advent, Nov. 27, 2011. From that date forward, no other edition of the Roman Missal may be used in the dioceses of the United States of America,” stated Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, in his Aug. 20 letter to the nation’s bishops.

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After 45 years, the Spirit finally returns to the Mass


The prevailing opinion seems to be that the newly translated Missal will come into use in the United States beginning with the First Sunday of Advent 2011. Other commentators consider 2012 a bit more realistic, but regardless of when it is introduced for official use the intervening months must be treated as “an opportunity for catechesis; a time to prepare for the reception of the new translation,” according to the Holy Father.

With this in mind, I’d like to share a brief excerpt adapted from,  And with Your Spirit – Recovering a sense of the sacred in the English translation of the Roman Missal – 3rd Edition, a booklet that I prepared for pastors, DRE’s, catechists and any other Catholic interested in preparing themselves and others well for what’s to come.

Once the Mass begins, we won’t have to wait long to encounter our very first change in the text:

When the priest says, The Lord be with you, no longer will the people reply, And also with you, but rather by saying, And with your spirit.

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Submitted by Doria2

NEW translation of the mass soon to be celebrated by more than 100 million English-speaking Catholics reaches back to church tradition, replacing the more colloquial and dumbed-down liturgy that was adopted by the Vatican 40 years ago.

Cardinal George Pell said the new mass had a “different cadence” to the translation of the Roman Missal that two generations of Australian Catholics grew up with, and which was a “bit dumbed-down”.

“The previous translators seemed a bit embarrassed to refer to angels, sacrifice and perpetual virginity,” Australia’s senior Catholic cleric said.

“They went softly on sin and redemption.”

The new translation places a heavier emphasis on Christ’s sacrifice and underlines the dependence of individuals on God. In one of the most controversial changes, the words of the consecration in the mass specify that Christ shed his blood “for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins”, rather than “for all” as the present translation puts it.

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Preview of the upcoming Mass Changes

Visit the site

New Mass Translation PDF file

Vatican approves new English translation of the Mass


Washington D.C., May 1, 2010 / 06:13 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- After eight years of work, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has approved a new translation of Roman Missal that contains the new text of the Mass in English. Once the missal is published in English, it will be gradually incorporated into parishes across America at the discretion of the local bishops.

During the Jubilee Year 2000, Pope John Paul II called for the revision of the English translation of the Missale Romanum. Since then, the International Commission on English in the Liturgy (ICEL) has been drafting a translation out of the original Latin.

In November of last year, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) approved the draft, which was then sent to Rome for the Vatican’s “recognitio.” While the Vatican is still making its final edits, the missal is expected to be forwarded to the USCCB for publication later this spring.

In addition to the new translation of the Roman Missal, a series of adaptations and proper texts were also approved by the Vatican.

The USCCB explained in a press release that each bishop will be in charge of gradually implementing the changes in his diocese.

“A great effort to produce the new Roman Missal for the United States of America is underway now among the publishers of liturgical books, along with the other necessary resources by publishers of liturgical music and catechetical resources,” said Msgr. Anthony Sherman, Director of the USCCB Secretariat for Divine Worship.

“Even as that work is underway a full–scale implementation of catechesis for the new Missal should be taking place in the parishes, so that when the time comes, everyone will be ready,” Msgr. Sherman added.

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Editor’s note: It took the Coca-Cola Company less than 90 days to figure out that “New Coke” was a huge mistake. The product is no longer available in retail markets, and the event is now merely an interesting case study in “Marketing 101” courses. Meanwhile, original Coca-Cola remains a best-seller, and the Coca-Cola Company remains the #1 producer of soft drinks in the world.

Forty-five years after its’ hurried introduction, the Catholic Church is finally getting around to correcting a few of the errors in the implementation of the Novus Ordo Mass. Statistics show that in 1965, 74 percent of U.S. Catholics attended Mass every Sunday. Today, that number is down to around 23 percent. In most European countries, Sunday Mass attendance (by percentage) continues to hover in the mid-single digits.

Maybe we Catholics ought to ordain a few deacons, priests and bishops who are former Coca-Cola executives, give them a modicum of freedom to do what’s necessary to turn things around, and see what happens!

Why should the Body of Christ have to continuously suffer from the worst (combined) management AND marketing that the world has ever seen … and wasn’t the Catholic Church “The Real Thing” long before Coca-Cola?

Defending the New Roman Missal

When the English Missale Romanum appeared in 1970, it was clear we had been handed a paraphrase instead of a translation. As a young priest required to use these texts, I quickly determined that something needed to be done to return to the people of God what Father Ryan dubs “their baptismal birthright”—that is, an English liturgy that seeks to convey all the depth, truth and beauty of the original Latin. By 1992, I had assembled a team of scholars who produced an alternative translation of the Ordinary of the Mass and presented that effort to the Bishops’ Committee on the Liturgy in Washington, D.C., and the Congregation for Divine Worship in Rome. Hostility was the response from Washington—copies of our draft were gathered and destroyed at the bishops’ meeting—while Rome expressed a guarded interest in our project.

Ultimately, the Holy See came to the realization that many of the vernacular translations of the liturgy were problematic. (English was not the only example, just one of the more egregious.) In 2001 the Congregation for Divine Worship promulgated Liturgiam Authenticam setting forth a coherent philosophy of translation. The document called for revised translations in keeping with these norms and the establishment of an oversight committee, Vox Clara, to ensure the fidelity of future translations.

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