Why Do Catholics Consider the Virgin Mary To Be An Intercessor?

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Q: Why do Catholics consider the Blessed Virgin Mary to be an intercessor?

Isn’t Mary just a created human person, like all the rest of us? And according to the Bible, isn’t Jesus the ONE intercessor between God and man?

Please explain.

A: Since you mentioned the Bible, crack your Bible open to Genesis 3:15. There you’ll see God’s very first promise to fallen mankind, and there you’ll find the first reference to “the woman” whose “seed” would someday crush the head of the serpent. 

People insist on their own intepretation of things, but one thing is certain … Mary is that “woman” … Mary said “yes” when God sent Gabriel to ask her to be the mother of his divine son … and some 9 months hence … Jesus did indeed emerge from Mary’s blessed womb.

Mary remained Jesus’ mom, and his first, best, and most constant disciple, ever since … and if that’s not a selfless act of intercession on behalf of all mankind (second only to God’s) than I don’t know what is.

Furthermore … anyone who expects Jesus to ignore this fact, and merely “discard” his mother Mary, once she had served her purpose, doesn’t know God! 

But there’s more. Go to the Gospel of Luke, chapter 1, verse 32.

Gabriel explains to Mary precisely WHO her son will be. One of his titles is the eternal King of the Royal House of Israel. And since Mary will ALWAYS be Jesus’ mom, Mary will ALWAYS remain the mother of the King.

According to the practices of the Royal House, first established by King David, later observed and followed by King Solomon, and ratified by God, through the authentic scriptures, the MOTHER of the King is the QUEEN, and the official duty of the Queen of the Royal House is to intercede with the King, on behalf of the people.   

Meet me at the 1st Book of Kings, Chapter 2, beginning with verse 12, for the proof.

Witness a disgruntled and powerless Adonais approaching Bathsheba, the Queen Mother, asking her to intercede for him, with  King Solomon. Then, witness the way the Queen is subsequently received:

The Queen enjoys unrestricted access to the King.

As the Queen approaches, the King sets up a throne for her, at this right hand.

He bows, and gives her his undivided attention. 

Those familiar with the Ten Commandments might recognize this as “Honor your Father and your Mother.”

In verse 24, we see Solomon acting on his mother’s request … but not in the way Adonais had expected. Adonais will be put to death!

There’s nothing in the rules that says the King must grant his mother’s request! 

Catholics rightly understand that these Old Testament events prefigure the grace-filled, New Testament reality.

In the New Testament, Jesus works a miracle at Cana, simply because his mother (the woman) asks, while one of the enduring promises of Christ is that all the faithful will rule and reign with him, in eternity.

It was Jesus who clearly stated that he is the God of the living, and not the dead … and that Abraham was able to “see” his coming, and was glad.

For these and other very good reasons, Catholics believe that the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Queen Mother of the House of Israel, and the mother of Jesus Christ, is also alive and in Heaven, ruling and reigning with Jesus, the Eternal King of the Ages, just as he promised.      

Catholics, what is the difference between the royal priesthood and the ministerial priesthood?

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 Q: Catholics, what is the difference  between the royal priesthood and the ministerial priesthood?

A: 1547 The ministerial or hierarchical priesthood of bishops and priests, and the common (royal) priesthood of all the faithful participate, “each in its own proper way, in the one priesthood of Christ.”

While being “ordered one to another,” they differ essentially.

In what sense? While the common priesthood of the faithful is exercised by the unfolding of baptismal grace –a life of faith, hope, and charity, a life according to the Spirit–, the ministerial priesthood is at the service of the common priesthood.

It is directed at the unfolding of the baptismal grace of all Christians.

The ministerial priesthood is a means by which Christ unceasingly builds up and leads his Church. For this reason it is transmitted by its own sacrament, the sacrament of Holy Orders.

Source:
Catechism of the Catholic Church