Miraculous survival, guardian angels and saintly relatives who have gone to their eternal reward

angel121

by Doug Lawrence

There is a horrific accident. Some people die. Some are spared.

Is it just a random game of numbers, or is there more to this than meets the eye?

Catholics and even some non-Catholic Christians will tell you about their guardian angels – powerful, pure spirit beings, personally assigned by God almighty, to keep us safe from harm.

Even less understood and appreciated are the “Kinsman Redeemers” who step forward to right wrongs and save their people from poverty, starvation, death – and worse.

Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God made man, is the ultimate Kinsman Redeemer, but the Bible shows us many more. The story of Ruth and Boaz is probably the next most significant, since through their timely meeting and subsequent marriage, the sacred blood line of the coming Messiah was preserved. (See 4:22, below.) 

Ruth 4:9-22
(9) And he said to the ancients, and to all the people: You are witnesses this day, that I have bought all that was Elimelech’s, and Chelion’s, and Mahalon’s, of the hand of Noemi:
(10) And have taken to wife Ruth, the Moabitess, the wife of Mahalon, to raise up the name of the deceased in his inheritance lest his name be cut off, from among his family and his brethren and his people. You, I say, are witnesses of this thing.
(11) Then all the people that were in the gate, and the ancients, answered: We are witnesses: The Lord make this woman who cometh into thy house, like Rachel, and Lia, who built up the house of Israel: that she may be an example of virtue in Ephrata, and may have a famous name in Bethlehem:
(12) And that the house may be, as the house of Phares, whom Thamar bore unto Juda, of the seed which the Lord shall give thee of this young woman.
(13) Boaz therefore took Ruth, and married her: and went in unto her, and the Lord gave her to conceive, and to bear a son.
(14) And the women said to Noemi: Blessed be the Lord, who hath not suffered thy family to want a successor: that his name should be preserved in Israel.
(15) And thou shouldst have one to comfort thy soul, and cherish thy old age. For he is born of thy daughter in law: who loveth thee: and is much better to thee, than if thou hadst seven sons.
(16) And Noemi taking the child, laid it in her bosom, and she carried it, and was a nurse unto it.
(17) And the women, her neighbours, congratulating with her, and saying, There is a son born to Noemi, called his name Obed: he is the father of Isai, the father of David.
(18) These are the generations of Phares: Phares begot Esron,
(19) Esron begot Aram, Aram begot Aminadab,
(20) Aminadab begot Nahasson, Nahasson begot Salmon,
(21) Salmon begot Booz, Booz begot Obed,
(22) Obed begot Isai (Jessie), Isai (Jessie) begot David.

Nor are Kinsman Redeemers required to be presently alive, here on earth. Catholics will explain the concept of the Communion of Saints – that great cloud of faithful witnesses who have gone before us – now in Heaven – eternally perfected in God’s power, grace and mercy. These holy souls have the right to approach the throne of the Most High God with their petitions – hopefully, interceding with him for us – their beloved progeny and “kin”.

This goes much, much further and it is much more powerful than we might imagine – since by virtue of our baptism, we are all adopted children of God – brothers and sisters in Jesus Christ, the Lord – with his mother – the Blessed Virgin Mary, also ours.

Saint Paul sums things up quite nicely:

Romans 8:28-39
(28) And we know that to them that love God all things work together unto good: to such as, according to his purpose, are called to be saints.
(29) For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be made conformable to the image of his Son: that he might be the Firstborn amongst many brethren.
(30) And whom he predestined, them he also called. And whom he called, them he also justified. And whom he justified, them he also glorified.
(31) What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who is against us?
(32) He that spared not even his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how hath he not also, with him, given us all things?
(33) Who shall accuse against the elect of God? God is he that justifieth:
(34) Who is he that shall condemn? Christ Jesus that died: yea that is risen also again, who is at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us.
(35) Who then shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation? Or distress? Or famine? Or nakedness? Or danger? Or persecution? Or the sword?
(36) (As it is written: For thy sake, we are put to death all the day long. We are accounted as sheep for the slaughter.)
(37) But in all these things we overcome, because of him that hath loved us.
(38) For I am sure that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor might,
(39) Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

So, the next time things turn out miraculously better than you might ever have expected, don’t forget to thank God, thank your guardian angel, and thank your “extended family” in Heaven. (But why wait? Take a moment to give God thanks and praise, right now!)

Remember too … All Souls Day and All Saints Day are rapidly approaching!

The article that inspired this post:

Toddler cheats death after car crashes into buggy and crushes it against wall

What is an intercessor and in what way is Jesus the only intercessor to God?

melchisedech

Q: What is an intercessor and in what way is Jesus the only intercessor to God?

A: By virtue of our baptism, as adopted children of God and members of the royal priesthood of believers … all of which is possible only through the finished work of Jesus Christ, the one mediator between God and man … we Christians have the right to pray directly to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit … any time we please.

But for many and various reasons, most significantly, our own personal, grevious sins and our fallen human nature, we can often benefit from some “qualified assistance” in that regard.

The biblical concept of “Kinsman Redeemer” holds that all of us are related through Adam, and that any one of us who is able, has a God-given right and even the responsibility to “step in” or intercede, for any of our less fortunate relatives or “kin”.

Abraham (Abram) was indeed the first biblical “type” of this when he rescued his nephew Lot from the kings of Sodom, and received a blessing from Melchizedek, as a result.

Probably the most cited biblical example of this concept is Boaz, who acted as kinsman redeemer for Ruth, who serves as the originator of the Davidic blood line, which of course applies most essentially to Jesus Christ, who by virtue of his incarnation, became the Messiah, who is the ultimate “Kinsman Redeemer” of the entire human race.

There are potentially many others, since this principle would certainly apply to all, according to God’s very own timeless law of love.

And while Jesus remains the one mediator between God and man, anyone who is in God’s favor (particularly, faithful Church members) especially those who are already perfected in Heaven (Mary, the Saints, the Angels) has the right (and yes, even the duty) to intercede for anyone on earth (or in Purgatory) who might need or request it.

This would typically be accomplished by humbly approaching the throne of Jesus Christ with one’s request, which is certainly permitted, since Jesus remains not only the one mediator, but also (among many other wonderful things) our High Priest, our brother, our King, and our God.

Catholics on earth do this through the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass (making excellent use of the ministerial priesthood, and of Melchizedek’s “original” bread and wine) where Jesus graciously serves in all these ways (24/7 and 365, all around the world) … and through all the other work, worship, sacraments and devotions of the Church … whose continuing mission is the salvation of souls.

The Book of Revelation describes the Heavenly version of this most sacred liturgy, where the prayers of the saints are never disregarded, since Heaven poses no barrier at all to God’s great and continuing work of redemption.

Why do people pray to saints in Heaven?

Q: Why do people pray to saints in heaven when the Bible does not give an example of this nor commands us to? ?

A: The Book of Ruth clearly defines the right of a kinsman to redeem family members who are related to them by blood.

Jesus, the Son of Man (son of Adam) is the most notable of all the kinsman redeemers.

That said, anyone … especially someone who is now in Heaven … has the same right to petition God on behalf of “kin” who are still alive on earth … and still working out their salvation.

This is where the saint’s right of intercession comes from. And we’re all related to Adam and Eve, so we’re all “kin”.

Better go back and study that Bible a bit closer!