San Jose bishop comes out for gun control, advocates changing the Bill of Rights.

When the framers of the Constitution included the “right to bear arms” among the freedoms enjoyed by the citizens of the United States, this nation was rural.  It was truly a different time.  Twenty-First Century American society does not resemble 1789. Perhaps it is time to consider curtailing this right.  Individual freedom should be subject to the common good.  If this were not the case, there would be no speed limits on our roads and highways, no crosswalks.

It is time to admit that the free availability of guns and ammunition poses a threat to the welfare of our people and that a “culture of violence” has eclipsed “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” as enduring values of this nation.

I join my fellow bishops in calling on film producers and video game creators to recognize the extent of violence in movies, television programs and video games, which have desensitized all of us.   We must also address the pervasive role of addiction and mental illness in crime.

It is time to change, to increase regulation, even to ban the possession of certain weapons.  I echo the words of the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Peace and Justice, that it is necessary “to impose a strict control on the sale of handguns and small arms.  Limiting the purchase of such arms would certainly not infringe on the rights of anyone” (The International Arms Trade, 2006).

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Editor’s note: To prove his point, the good bishop need only enumerate all the wonderful improvements made to the Catholic Church since the liberal innovations of Vatican II were implemented. And for the record … limiting the purchase of such arms would most certainly infringe on MY rights, under the Constitution of the United States of America. (Doug Lawrence, January 2, 2013)

Students punished for wearing American flag themed clothing on Cinco de Mayo

Country in Distress!

Five students at a California high school were forced to leave school and then face disciplinary action yesterday for the crime of wearing clothing printed with American flag designs.

If you’re wondering how being patriotic could possibly merit punishment, it’s because the kids displayed the American flags on May 5. And as everyone knows, American flags are absolutely verboten on May 5.

Right? Doesn’t anybody remember that rule? Anybody? Bueller?

According to local TV stations KTVU and NBC Bay Area, this bewildering and deeply unsettling incident happened at Live Oak High School in Morgan Hill, a suburban town south of San Jose. As KTVU reported,

Five students at a South Bay high school stirred up some controversy Wednesday for wearing t-shirts depicting red, white and blue American flags on Cinco de Mayo.

School officials at Live Oak High in Morgan Hill told the students they had to go home if they wouldn’t turn the shirts inside out.

One of the students said it appeared school administrators were worried the patriotic shirts could trigger fights.

Some students at Live Oak High in Morgan Hill said others were planning to come to school Thursday wearing red, white and blue.

Four of the five students who wore American flags or patriotic colors on campus walked into a meeting with the superintendent of the Morgan Hill unified school district Wednesday night.

They were facing unexcused absences because they chose to go home early rather than take off what they were wearing.

“We knew it was Cinco de Mayo. But we just came to show our flag,” said student Dominic Maciel. “We didn’t mean anything by it. We didn’t want to start anything. Nothing like that.”

Student Anthony Caravalho was also sent home for not turning his shirt inside out.

“They said we had to wear our t-shirts inside out and then we could go back to class and we said no,” said Caravalho. “It would be disrespectful to the flag by hiding it.”

Daniel Galli, another student who was reprimanded for wearing a US flag, described what he was told by school administration.

“He said ‘If you wear it on any other day, it’s fine; but just because it’s today you can’t wear it,’” Galli said.

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