Saint’s daughter shares inspiring words of hope, faith, love.

My beloved dad, the most worthy spouse of my beloved saint mother, in a concise but affectionate biography of my mother (he wrote it in April 1971 and dedicated it to my brother Pierluigi, my sister Laura and me), testified:

“Your mother’s life has been a perpetual act and action of faith and charity; it has been an incessant search, in each decision and in each deed, for God’s will, with meditation and prayer, the holy Mass and the Eucharist. It is a continuous accomplishment of the Gospel precepts and advises, even of those which are calling you at the top of your duty, to the apostolate and to love, always, even when the sacrifice required is that of your own life.”

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Priest: Corapi’s actions causing scandal

Briefly… in the hope that I might post more thoughtfully on the subject:

  • priests function only by faculty of their respective Ordinaries;
  • we all hope for justice in the Church;
  • sometimes the innocent suffer;
  • this applies to priests;
  • priests are ordained to a special consecration unto Christ the Head
  • Who was the Innocent Victim
  • and if we priests become innocent victims…
  • we must be prepared to embrace the suffering involved
  • and in humble obedience
  • die to ourselves
  • even while pursuing the legitimate recourses to which we have a right in Canon Law
  • no matter how slowly these may proceed
  • or how unjustly we may think we are being treated.
  • So Corapi should do the same.
  • He should die to self rather than refusing to die (as he puts it on his new website) by “resigning” his priesthood and leading people away from their pastors by the scandal that such a public defection is causing in the Church.

Link

Bishop Tobin prefers to maintain a positive view of things happening in today’s church.

I see a Church in which the vast majority of priests are good and sincere men who work very hard, conscientiously and generously, to serve the Lord Jesus and His people.

I see a Church in which most of our parishes are strong and vibrant; parishes that are filled every Sunday with good and faithful people who assemble to hear the Word of God, to receive the Holy Eucharist, and to thank God for the many gifts and blessings they’ve received.

I see a Church in which thousands of individuals, women and men, young and old, assist the Church either as paid professionals or volunteers in diverse fields such as Catholic education, religious education, youth ministry, Catholic Scouting, parish leadership and liturgical ministries.

I see a Church that has dedicated lay organizations – such as the Knights of Columbus, the Daughters of Isabella, the Saint Vincent de Paul Societies and many others – which invest lots of time, talent and money to do great, but often unseen things, in service to our Church and community.

I see a Church that’s not at all afraid to wade into the turbulent waters of intense public debate and bring the truth of the Gospel to issues such as health-care reform, immigration, abortion and same-sex marriage.

I see a Church that provides outstanding social services – supporting nursing homes and food pantries, helping refugees get settled in their new homes, teaching immigrants to speak English, providing heating assistance for families, and opening shelters for homeless folks during dark, cold winter nights.

I see a Church that’s determined in its defense of human life, with brave and hardy individuals praying in front of abortion clinics on frigid January mornings, generously providing for the needs of single moms, and testifying on behalf of holy matrimony in the halls of the State House.

I see a Church in which scores of remarkable young people spend their vacation time travelling to Jamaica and other Central American countries ministering to impoverished, handicapped children who will never have the material blessings that they themselves have.

You see, in the Catholic Church there are so many good people; so many good things that happen everyday. This is just a snapshot of the Church I see, and no doubt I’ve missed other parts of the beautiful mosaic. To those I haven’t mentioned, I apologize, but thank you too, for your dedication and truly good work.

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Love, Sex, and the Cross

Being chaste until and within marriage, committing day in and day out to the self-giving and self-denial that lifelong marriage and child-rearing require of us, being open to God’s gift of new life in a generous and responsible way, and in this day and age, even carrying to term an unexpected child — these are difficult tasks, and our fallen nature rebels against them.

The world recognizes this natural rebellion, our desire to express human love in sexual intimacy, to seek pleasure and run from pain, to fulfill our own needs and desires while giving ill-attention to the needs and desires of others — in a word, to live our lives for ourselves.
Mistaking these desires for human nature — rather than fallen human nature — the world’s response is to laugh at Church teaching, to make a mockery of the Church and her seemingly archaic rules on sex and marriage, because they are so difficult, because they require so much of us.
Yet those who seek to follow the way of Our Lord understand that much is required of us. This is precisely the point. God calls us out of our fallenness, out of our self-centeredness and pleasure-seeking, to follow the way of perfection, to live in a way that is, by natural means, difficult — at times, even impossible. Many complain that Church teachings on sex and marriage are unrealistic, that the Church is out of touch. If we were meant to live by human means alone, to follow these teachings on our own strength, I would say the world’s complaints were absolutely right. Indeed, by my own strength, I failed at almost every one of them.

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