What is the point of being a Christian?

Question: What’s the point of being a Christian? What makes Christianity the “true faith”?

Answer: The main point of being a Christian is to faithfully “align” ones self with Jesus Christ, in the hope of overcoming eternal death.

Christianity is the “true faith” because Jesus Christ is a real, historical person who actually proved he was God by his holy life, his miracles, his salvific death (precisely as prophesied, well in advance) and his glorious resurrection.

By his resurrection, Jesus Christ proved that he had overcome the power of death and only through faith in Christ are we able to maintain that blessed hope for ourselves, as well as our friends and loved ones.

Then, we have 2,000 years of continuous testimony to divine revelation and truth by the Catholic Church, which Jesus personally founded, authorized, empowered and perpetually guaranteed – a church which has miraculously withstood the scandals, abuses, shortcomings and general malfeasance of the heinous sinners who continue to lead, govern and belong to it.

No other faith tradition offers the slightest hope of overcoming eternal death, nor does any other faith tradition have the ability to provide the other very significant benefits of Christianity, because the best they can offer is some form of temporary happiness on earth, followed by an eternity separated from God.

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Bishop Vasa: Faith no longer self-evident proposition even among Catholic volunteers.

In effect, the claim is that medical care, social services and education are not ‘religious’ in and of themselves and therefore are not worthy of ‘religious freedom’ protections. This societal separation of faith from the works which express that faith, unfortunately, has been preceded by a form of this separation in the minds and hearts of our Catholic people.

Not only is faith no longer a “self-evident presupposition” in society, it is even possible that it is no longer a “self-evident presupposition” in the hearts of the apostolic workers themselves.

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Seen on the web: Catholicism is not a sect.

In her recent letter to the editor (”Troubling times at St. Joseph,” Times-Standard, Page A4), Ms. Neeva Olson called the Catholic Church a “sect.” That could not be further from the truth. The Church was established 2,000 years ago by Jesus Christ and can trace its roots all the way back to his Apostles. It was not until 1,500 years later that the other thousands of denominations began to form.

In my dictionary a “sect” is called: A religious body that has separated from a larger denomination. That would seem to apply to all the other traditions and certainly not to the Catholic Church.

Ms. Olson would do well to consider that the very book that is the foundation of all the Christian denominations came from the monks of the Catholic Church who painstakingly preserved all the writings during the centuries before the printing press was invented.

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The Kingship of Christ over All Human Societies: Modern Catholic Social Teaching on the separation of Church and State

The Apostolic letter Post tam Diuturnas and the later encyclical Quas Primas were both explicitly hostile to eighteenth-century notions of the separation of Church and State.  In Arcanum and elsewhere, Leo XIII envisioned the Church and the State as working together:  “If civil power combines in a friendly manner with the spiritual power of the Church, it necessarily follows that both parties will greatly benefit.”  St. Pius X was outspoken on the issue, and Pius XI asserted that the “Christ has no authority whatever in civil affairs” was a “grave error.”  Casti Connubi is quite fulsome in its expressed desire that the State will “assist” the Church by creating laws that protect all those matters that we now identify with “the culture of life,” including the discouragement of divorce and birth control.

Papal statements denouncing any assertion for the “separation of church and state” are uniform in the eighteenth through twentieth centuries.  A summary of early statements can be found in the “syllabus” collected by Bl. Pius IX and promulgated in Quant Cura.  This encyclical and its syllabus were referenced throughout the first half of the twentieths century.  It contains a group of errors related to Church-State relations, all soundly condemned.

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At least Arnold didn’t have the child aborted

News of Arnold Schwartzenegger’s “love child” hit the news today. I won’t go into the details, but in spite of the adultery and fornication, all parties involved deserve credit for (at least) choosing not to abort the child … something that’s all too common in most states … including California.

Tom Roeser on certain downtrodden minorities … and pro-lifers

…you have heard it said by Jefferson and Lincoln that all of us are equal. Not so.

All minorities are more than equal—as are these members of the downtrodden: gays, lesbians, transgenders—but not to be given any separate recognition are the unborn whose supporters come close to violating the sacred tradition of separation of church and state and allowing the pollution of the secular world with religiosity in contradistinction to the founders’ wishes.

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