What if the Shroud of Turin image is genuine and what if Jesus resembled his mother?

maryjesusshroud

A Canadian filmmaker has posted a retouched image of a Bouguereau painting of the Virgin Mary — using the face on the Shroud as a guide. The results are, I think, stunning.

His assumption that He would have born a resemblance to His only human parent. He said this about it:

“If you put the shroud on top of this drawing, you will almost match the face, like it could be” an accurate portrayal of His mother’s face.

Exquisitely beautiful – and it does rather make sense that Our Lord would physically resemble his mother!

Submitted by Bob Stanley/The Catholic Treasure Chest Website

More about the works of artist William Bouguereau

Pollen is evidence that the Holy Shroud is indeed a winding sheet

According to university researchers the pollen found in the Turin Shroud corresponds to that of flowers used for funerals in Asia Minor 2000 years ago.

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Submitted by Bob Stanley

Shroud of Turin: Creation of image required amazing, unobtainable, 34 thousand billion watts of VUV power.

It is this observation, “coupled with the extreme superficiality of the coloring and the lack of pigments” that “makes it extremely unlikely that a shroud-like picture was obtained using a chemical contact method, both in a modern laboratory and even more so by a hypothetical medieval forger”.   “There is no image beneath the blood stains.

This means that the traces of blood deposited before the image was. Therefore, the image was formed after the corpse was laid down.  Furthermore, all the blood stains have well-defined edges, no burrs, so it can be assumed that the corpse was not removed from the sheet.

“There are no signs of putrefaction near the orifices, which usually occur around 40 hours after death.  Consequently, the image is not the result of  putrefaction gases and the corpse was not left in the sheet for more than two days”.

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History Channel uses 21st century computer technology to reveal the face on the Shroud of Turin

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Author claims little known veil illustrates Christ’s resurrection

In this interview with ZENIT, Badde explained some of the conclusions of his research on this veil, and why he thinks it is bound to change the world.

ZENIT: Some have referred to the Veil of Manoppello as belonging to Veronica, and having the image of Jesus’ face from before the Crucifixion. Your investigation, however, led you to a different conclusion. Could you clarify what this veil is?

Badde: This veil has had many names in the last 2000 years — maintaining only its unique character in the same time.

It is, in fact, “the napkin” or “handkerchief” (in Greek: soudarion), to which St. John the Evangelist is referring in his report of the discovery of the empty tomb by St. Peter and himself, that they saw “apart” from the cloths (including the shroud of Joseph from Arimathea) in which Jesus had been buried.

This napkin, St. John says, had originally been laying upon the Face of Jesus.

This veil had to be kept completely secret right away — together with the Shroud of Turin — in the first community of the Apostles in Jerusalem due to the ritual impurity in Judaism of everything stemming from a grave. And it remained secret for many centuries.

This explains why it had been bearing many different names in the course of history after it appeared in public some hundred years later in the Anatolian town of Edessa for the first time.

Among all these different names are for instance: The Edessa Veil, The Image or Letter of King Abgar, The Camuliana Veil, The Mandylion, The Image Not Made by Man’s Hand (in Greek: acheiropoieton), The Fourfolded Veil (in Greek: tetradiplon) or — today — The Holy Face (Il Volto Santo). The “Veil of Veronica” is just another name of all those that meant altogether this very veil in Manoppello.

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Previous articles on this subject

God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God

MAN OF THE CLOTH

WorldNetDaily Exclusive

Shroud of Turin a ‘radiation photo’ of resurrection?

New study bolsters theory that body of Jesus Christ produced image

For instance, the authors noted the Shroud’s frontal and dorsal body images are “encoded with the same amount of intensity, independent of any pressure or weight from the body,” such that the bottom part of the cloth that bore all the weight of the crucified man’s supine body is not encoded with a greater amount of intensity than the frontal image.

“Radiation coming from the body would not only explain this feature, but also the left/right and light/dark reversals found on the cloth’s frontal and dorsal body images,” the authors note.

In arguing that the source of light that created the body image on the Shroud came from within the body, the authors observed that “neither the outside or inside of the tomb, nor the outside or inside of either the front or back sides of the cloth” are found on the Shroud’s image.

“This means that the source of light does not originate outside of the body, the cloth or the tomb, but with the body itself,” they write. “The weave of the inner part of the cloth containing the frontal and dorsal images is not even part of the distinctive images, which they too, would have been, if the light came from anywhere outside the body.”

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Submitted by Bob Stanley

Shroud of Turin Image and Ancient Christ Pantocrator Icon Appear To Be A Match

In 1207, Nicholas d’Orrante, the abbot of Casole and the Papal legate in Athens, wrote about relics taken from Constantinople by French knights and referred to a cloth that was seen “with our own eyes” in Athens.

At this time the historical trail of the Image of Edessa disappears.

Then, in 1356, Geoffrey de Charny, a French knight and descendent of a famous knight of the Fourth Crusade, displayed a burial shroud that he claimed to be the burial cloth of Christ. That shroud is now called the Shroud of Turin.

Another interesting historical fact – images/paintings of Christ in full frontal view didn’t appear until after the discovery of the Shroud found in Edessa. The painting Christ Pantocrator Icon painted on the walls of St. Catherine’s Monastery in the Sinai. Photographs of the painting and the Shroud facial image were taken, and then grid lines were added in order to compare the facial features. Then without the gridlines, the photos were superimposed as shown to the left. It was found that they matched.

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