Why would Pope Francis say in June that there is a “gay lobby” in the Vatican and then say a month later that although there had been “talk about the gay lobby,” he’s never seen it on “the Vatican ID card”?

question

Jorge Mario Bergoglio/Francis’s “Who am I to judge” dismissal of the depravity represented even by any kind of perverse inclinations or impulses or feelings speaks volumes as to his complete shallowness as a thinker, no less to the total theological bankruptcy that characterizes the words he utters that so tickle the itching ears of men steeped in the universal pestilence of sentimentality.

While God alone is the sole Judge of the subjective state of souls, He gave us the sensus fidei when we were baptized in order to be able to recognize sin for what it is and thus to amend our own lives when are tempted to sin or find ourselves in the near occasion of sin.

This sensus fidei also provides us with the ability to perform the Spiritual Works of Mercy, which includes, of course, admonishing the sinner.

It is very telling that, as noted a few days ago, Jorge Mario Bergoglio never talks about the Spiritual Works of Mercy. Never means precisely that, that Catholics believe in the Spiritual Works of Mercy, Jorge. Here is a little review for you:

To instruct the ignorant.
To counsel the doubtful.
To admonish sinners.
To bear wrongs patiently;
To forgive offences willingly;
To comfort the afflicted;
To pray for the living and the dead.

Catholics also believe that there are nine ways
that they can be accessories to the sins of others:

1. By counsel.
2. By command.
3. By consent.
4. By provocation.
5. By praise or flattery of the evil done.
6. By silence.
7. By connivance.
8. By partaking.
9. By defense of the ill done.

Link

Editor’s note: This article comes from a site which maintains, among other things, that there have been no true popes since the 2nd Vatican Council. But even such a grave error does little or nothing to discredit the particular observations contained in the linked article – which, while somewhat disrespectful – are worthy of serious consideration by adult Catholics.

The Legion of Mary, the Gospel of Life, and the Spiritual Works of Mercy

By Maureen Ward

In the area of Catholic Pastoral Care, the Legion of Mary is second to none. How can it not be since Frank Duff “invented” Pastoral Care so to speak. When Frank Duff, who was a Civil Servant by trade and a St. Vincent de Paul member in his free time, initially started the Legion of Mary which began as a little association to do spiritual works of mercy, the first assignment was to visit the sick in the wards of a large Dublin Hospital .

In pro life issues, I am afraid the Legion of Mary is lagging behind what I believe Frank Duff would have expected of this association that he founded.

When it comes to unborn children who unquestionably are the weakest of the weak, the most downtrodden of the downtrodden, the Legion of Mary, in many places, seems to me to be sadly lacking in mercy if we do not include them in the Legion’s ministry.  We are abandoning pre-born children and their mothers in our outreach. Some in the organization consider these pro-life works of mercy, such as instructing, counseling and praying as being political. I disagree.  It is not political to counsel and it is not political to instruct.  It is certainly not political to pray.

Unfortunately I have even had some members tell me that praying cannot count as a suitable legion work. Prayer is probably the most important legion of Mary work there is.  Here is a quotation from Pope John Paul II “Pray for the many spiritual and material needs of your families, your communities, the whole Church, and all of humanity. Indeed, prayer is the first and greatest work of charity that we must do for our brothers and sisters.” I couldn’t agree more,

There are so many ways that the legion of Mary can answer the Church’s Call to defend and promote Life.  Praying silently or counseling women at abortion sites seems like a good way to me. We could and probably should be promoting Holy Hours with prayers for unborn children and their mothers and all others who are affected by abortion. Also, there is the Spiritual Adoption Program for the unborn which I think would be an ideal project for a Praesidium to take on.  If the Legion of Mary really presents the “True Face of the Catholic Church” (Pope John XXIII) then we must visibly and with conviction, defend all of her Teachings.

Shawn Carney the National representative from 40 days for Life says:

“When you pray at the abortion facility you represent the last hope for the baby scheduled to be aborted …

… but you are also represent the first sign of mercy as the woman leaves the facility after the abortion.”

This Week’s Ask Alice: “A Buddha statue in Catholic home” (Click on the included links for a comprehensive Lenten Catholic study)



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She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
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Chickie writes: While visiting the home of a terminally ill Catholic friend, I was surprised to find a large “Buddha” figurine prominently displayed there.

This seems like paganism and idolatry, and it really bothers me. It also makes me wonder if the presence of this idol might be somehow nullifying the prayers we have been offering up for her recovery.

I feel like I should say something to my friend, but she’s so sick right now, that it might just make things worse.

I’ve also considered writing a note to her husband about it, but I really don’t know if that would be a good idea, either.

None the less, I can’t imagine why good Catholic would have such an image in their home.

I’ve recently been praying hard on this. What do you think I should I do?

Alice answers: Does your Catholic friend have a crucifix or picture of Jesus in her house? If so, that is a good sign.

Since she is terminally ill, the present time is not opportune for arguing about the Buddha figurine in her home. Sick people and their caregivers are suffering much pain and can become upset easily. You are correct in thinking that your well-intentioned comments might make things worse. You don’t want your friend and her husband to slam the door on your future visits.

A Buddha statue cannot harm a baptized, faithful Catholic. The mere presence of the statue will not nullify prayers for her recovery.

Siddhartha Gautama Buddha (563-483 B.C.) was a spiritual teacher who founded the Buddhist religion. He was a human being, not a pagan god. If you saw a statue of Abraham Lincoln or Dr. Martin Luther King in a Catholic home, you would assume that the family felt deep respect for a good man. You would not worry that they were worshiping idols.

(Important note: The Buddhist religion typically incorporates many elements of two pagan belief systems known as Pantheism and Brahminism, which are both in serious conflict with many/most authentic Catholic/Christian beliefs and practices.)

If you feel compelled to speak, simply ask where your friend got the Buddha statue. If she received it as a gift from an Asian friend or purchased it as a decoration for her home, then the only problem is that your taste in decorating differs from hers.

If your Catholic friend said that she prays to Buddha, then she is mixing religions, which is definitely wrong. However, no demonic influence is likely to result from her misguided efforts, since she faithfully prays to our Triune God.

Please don’t allow a figurine to separate you from your sick friend. By arguing over Buddha, Satan might work his wiles and alienate your friend. Instead, ignore the Buddha while visiting, then say a prayer privately that the statue will be removed from her home. If your budget permits, you might buy a crucifix or statue of Jesus and wrap it up as a gift for your dear friend.

Above all, please stay focused on your mission to “visit the sick” and “pray for the living and the dead,” which are Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy. “Where two or three are gathered in My name, there am I in their midst.” (Matthew 18:20)

You are doing wonderful work in supporting your dying friend and her husband! Your charity pleases God (the real one). Just keep doing your job (prayerful visits) and leave your worries about the Buddha statue to God. That’s His job.

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

More about statues and images

Correcting the Sinner is not “Being Judgmental.” It is an Essential Work of Charity.

In these times one of the most forgotten virtues and obligations we have is the duty to correct the sinner. It is listed among the Spiritual Works of Mercy. St. Thomas Aquinas lists it in the Summa as a work of Charity:  [F]raternal correction properly so called, is directed to the amendment of the sinner. Now to do away with anyone’s evil is the same as to procure his good: and to procure a person’s good is an act of charity, whereby we wish and do our friend well. (II, IIae, 33.1)

Now to be sure, there are some judgments that are forbidden us. For example we cannot assess that we are better or worse than someone else before God. Neither can we always understand the ultimate culpability or inner intentions of another person as though we were God. Scripture says regarding judgments such as these: Not as man sees does God see, because man sees the appearance but the LORD looks into the heart (1 Sam 16:7). Further we are instructed that we cannot make the judgment of condemnation. That is to say, we do not have the power or knowledge to condemn someone to Hell. God alone is judge in this sense. The same scriptures also caution us against being unnecessarily harsh or punitive. As we already read from Luke, Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful. Stop judging and you will not be judged. Stop condemning and you will not be condemned. Forgive and you will be forgiven…. For the measure with which you measure will in return be measured out to you (Luke 6:36-38).  So in this text “to judge” means to condemn or to be unmerciful, to be unreasonably harsh.

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