Read the collected works of St. Teresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross and St. Therese of Lisieux (for free)

teresaofavila

Interior Castle is the work of 16th century Carmelite nun and Christian mystic St. Teresa of Avila. She wrote Interior Castle as a spiritual guide to union with God. Her inspiration for the work came from a vision she received from God. In it, there was a crystal globe with seven mansions, with God in the innermost mansion. St. Teresa interpreted this vision as an allegory for the soul’s relationship with God; each mansion represents one place on a path towards the “spiritual marriage”–i.e. union–with God in the seventh mansion.

Read it at CCEL

stjohncross

A sequel and continuation of Ascent of Mount Carmel, the Dark Night of the Soul is a spiritually moving and mystical book. In it, St. John of the Cross continues his description of the soul’s journey–the “dark night”–to the “divine union of the love of God.”

Read Ascent of Mount Carmel at CCEL

Read Dark Night of the Soul at CCEL

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St. Therese of Lisieux was born at Alencon, Normandy. In 1886 she underwent a religious conversion and thereafter dedicated herself to monastic life. Entering the Carmelite convent at Lisieux at fifteen, she was appointed assistant novice mistress in 1893. One year before her death (1897) from tuberculosis, she volunteered to join the Carmelite missionaries in China.

Her devotional book, The Little Way, was widely acclaimed, as was her autobiography The Story of a Soul. Miracles of healing and prophecy soon were attributed to her name, and an account of these was appended in 1907 to the autobiography.

Read The Story of A Soul At CCEL

Read The Poems of St. Therese at CCEL

 

The Nun’s Story

MOBILE, Alabama — In her teen years, in Catholic school in Philadelphia, Mary Theresa Casey felt she wanted to pursue a religious vocation, but neither teaching nor nursing appealed to her.

When she heard about the Order of the Blessed Virgin of Mount Carmel — a contemplative order devoted to prayer — she says she “felt something stir in me.”

She read about the devout members of the order who had helped shape it, including St. Teresa of Avila of Spain and St. Therese of Lisieux, “the Little Flower” of 19th century France.

After hiding a book on the Carmelites “under my pillow,” she recalls, she let her desires be known.

“I needed to be close to God,” she says.

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Relics of St Thérèse of Lisieux tour England and Wales

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