2014 Chicago March for Life – Sunday, January 19 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm

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The March for Life Chicago is an annual public event composed of people from diverse ethnic, social, and religious backgrounds dedicated to defending & protecting all human life.

On January 19, 2014, we will march in hope with Chicagoans from every walk of life under one goal: to end abortion.

WHEN:
Sunday, January 19 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm

START:
Federal Plaza (50 W Adams, Chicago) + Rally & Speakers!

END:
State of Illinois Building (100 W Randolph, Chicago)
+ Celebration of Life!

 For more information about the March for Life of Chicago visit www.marchforlifechicago.com or download the flier here. Please share this event with your friends and family!

Submitted by Illinois Illinois Right to Life Committee

The Importance Of Sunday In The Lives Of Christians

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The pastoral statement on the importance of Sunday calls for Orthodox and Catholic Christians to recover the theological significance of a day that for many “has become less a day of worship and family and more like an ordinary work day.” It ends with a call to clergy and laity “to work cooperatively within their communities to stress the importance of Sunday for worship and family.”

The full text of the statement is available online here.

Recovering the theological significance of Sunday is fundamental to rebalancing our lives.

For Christians, Sunday, the Lord’s Day, is a special day consecrated to the service and worship of God.  It is a unique Christian festival.  It is “the day the Lord has made” (Ps. 117 (118):24). Its nature is holy and joyful. Sunday is the day on which we believe God acted decisively to liberate the world from the tyranny of sin, death, and corruption through the Holy Resurrection of Jesus.

The primacy of Sunday is affirmed by the liturgical practice of the early church. St. Justin the Martyr writing around 150 AD notes that “it is on Sunday that we assemble because Sunday is the first day, the day on which God transformed darkness and matter and created the world and the day that Jesus Christ rose from the dead (First Apology, 67).” Sunday has always had a privileged position in the life of the church as a day of worship and celebration. On Sunday the Church assembles to realize her eschatological fullness in the Eucharist by which the Kingdom and the endless Day of the Lord are revealed in time.  It is the perpetual first day of the new creation, a day of rejoicing.  It is a day for community, feasting and family gatherings.

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Pope: “Humanity has no future without the family.”

“Humanity has no future without the family,” he said. Young people need to be born and raised in “that community of life and love that God himself wanted,” that is, a family based on marriage between a man and woman, he said.

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Tribune (and others) see nothing wrong with homosexuals openly and lewdly parading on Sunday … the Lord’s Day.

Homosexual journalist and “lapsed Catholic,” Rex Wockner writes:

The Chicago gay pride parade attracts 800,000 people. It proceeds through a heavily congested, dense urban cityscape. Absolutely positively everything in its wake is disrupted. What on earth makes one service at one church on one day special enough to change the start time of a gigantic parade?

The “gay liberation” movement couldn’t care less if their parade of perversion and egregious public lewdness disrupts the services of scores of churches. And likely the Trib’s editorial board doesn’t care either.

Worse than their obtuseness regarding Cardinal George’s analogy is the editorial board’s dishonest misrepresentation of his comments. The editors conclude by asserting that the parade does not “stifle anyone’s religious beliefs.” Nice rhetorical trick. The deceit, of course, is that Cardinal George never claimed the parade would stifle beliefs. He said it might “interfere” with worship. Surely, the editors would concede that it’s possible that it might interfere with worship services. Those who don’t want to see public nudity or wild celebrations of sexual perversion, or who don’t want their children to see such images, might justifiably deem the parade an interference.

Although Cardinal George did not refer to “stifling religious belief,” the editors did, so I will respond: They must be kidding. Are they actually arguing that no member of the “gay liberation” movement seeks to stifle religious belief? Many in the movement to normalize homosexuality seek to eradicate all orthodox religious belief or at minimum make it so socially, legally, and politically costly that no one will dare express such beliefs. The “gay liberation” movement poses a serious threat to First Amendment religious protections (not to mention speech and parental rights).

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How should the Catholic keep Sunday holy, and how does he profane it?

Sunday is kept holy by abstaining from all servile work performed for wages or gain, or not commanded by necessity; by passing the day in works of piety; in hearing Mass devoutly, listening to the word of God in church and spending the day at home in a quiet manner pleasing to God.

If justly prevented from being present at church on Sundays and holy days of obligation, we should unite, in spirit, with the priest and the faithful assembled there, and pray fervently; during the rest of the day we should read books of devotion, and endeavor to perform some work of charity.

Sunday is profaned by being spent either in idleness, or in unnecessary servile work, or in that which is still worse, debauchery, and other sinful actions. It would be better, that is, less sinful, as St. Augustine says, to till the field on such days, than to spend them in frivolous, dangerous, and sinful pleasures.

But it is not forbidden, after having properly attended divine service, to participate on Sundays and holy days in honorable, decorous entertainment of the mind and heart.

Excerpted from “Explanation of the Epistles and Gospels” by the Rev. Leonard Goffine (1874)

Submitted by Bob Stanley

Why should Sunday be devoted exclusively to God?

Why should Sunday be devoted exclusively to God?

Because it is but proper that man, who is created for the service of God only, should reserve at least one out of the seven days of the week for that service, and for the salvation of his own soul; again, in the beginning, God ordered that on the seventh day or Saturday, on which He rested after finishing the work of creation (Ex. 20:11), man should also rest (Ex. 20:8‑10), abstain from all worldly employment, and attend only to the worship of God. This was the Sabbath, or day of rest, of the Jews which they were required to keep holy (Lev. 23:3).

But the Catholic Church, authorized 6y Christ, inspired by the Holy Ghost, and directed by the Apostles, has made Sunday, the first day of the week, the day of rest for Christians. The holy martyr Justin (+ 167 A.D.) makes mention of this fact. Sunday was designated as the day of rest for the Christians partly to distinguish them from the Jews, as well as for the following reasons: On this day God commenced the creation of the world, so too on this day He crowned the glorious work of our Redemption by Christ’s Resurrection; on this day, as Bellarmine says, Christ was born, was circumcised, and was baptized; and on this day the Holy Ghost descended upon the Apostles.

Excerpted from the English translation of the “Explanation of the Epistles and Gospels” by the Rev. Leonard Goffine (1874).

Submitted by Bob Stanley