How to Survive a Plane Crash: 10 Tips That Could Save Your Life.

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While the odds of being involved
in a plane crash may be slim,
they’re not zero.

If it happened to you,
would you know what to do
to increase your chances
of walking away?

In today’s post
we’re going to offer
research-backed advice
from Ben Sherwood’s The Survivor’s Club
on what you can do
to make it out
of a plane crash alive.

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Vain repetition?

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Revelation 4:8-11 And the four living creatures had each of them six wings: and round about and within they are full of eyes. And they rested not day and night, saying: Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty, who was and who is and who is to come. (9) And when those living creatures gave glory and honor and benediction to him that sitteth on the throne, who liveth for ever and ever: (10) The four and twenty ancients fell down before him that sitteth on the throne and adored him that liveth for ever and ever and cast their crowns before the throne, saying: (11) Thou art worthy, O Lord our God, to receive glory and honor and power. Because thou hast created all things: and for thy will they were and have been created.

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July 25–Lt. Nathan Jeffcoat, of Orrtanna, didn’t always want to be a U.S. Marine, but it’s safe to say it’s something that runs in his blood.

After being hit by an improvised explosive device, IED, in Afghanistan on June 30 and traveling back to the states, doctors went looking for him in his hospital room to do physical therapy, and the platoon commander in the 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines was nowhere to be found.

Turns out, in true commander fashion, he had escaped and made his way through a quarantined hospital area to check on one of his men who had been injured two weeks before him, and was still in the hospital.

Jeffcoat knows he’s a lucky man, a lucky Marine…

“He’s really, really lucky,” [his mother] Sue said, as she watched her son.

She breaks the eye contact to say she tells him all the time it’s because of the number of times she said the rosary for him, and all the prayers.

When he came back, the only things he had on him where his dog tags, watch, St. Christopher’s medallion and his rosary.

“Pray pray pray,” Sue Jeffcoat said.

That’s how they got through this, and that’s how they’ll get through it during the next tour.

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51-foot-high gate, criticized as wasteful public works project, successfully protected Japanese town from tsunami.

In the rubble of Japan’s northeast coast, one small village stands as tall as ever after the tsunami. No homes were swept away. In fact, they barely got wet.

Fudai is the village that survived — thanks to a huge wall once deemed a mayor’s expensive folly and now vindicated as the community’s salvation.

The 3,000 residents living between mountains behind a cove owe their lives to a late leader who saw the devastation of an earlier tsunami and made it the priority of his four-decade tenure to defend his people from the next one.

His 51-foot (15.5-meter) floodgate between mountainsides took a dozen years to build and meant spending more than $30 million in today’s dollars.

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Seen on the web: The truth of how those 33 men survived 69 days at more than 2000 feet below ground.

Judith Tosado
October 13, 2010 3:16 PM

Listening to the news, this morning, about the rescue in Chile it amazes me how no one in the mainstream news can pinpoint the Truth of how those 33 men survived 69 days at more than 2000 feet below ground. All the analysts and pundants go on and on about their daily routine to stay mentally and physically fit. They focus on details like, “they knew what time it was because they had cell phones” and they ignore the one item they barely mention at all, the time they took to pray. One of the miners, the 9th one rescued, became their spiritual leader. they sent for a crucifix, rosaries and statues Mary and saints. When he came out he kneeled down in prayers to thank God. His wife of more than 20 years is planning a church wedding because their first one was a civil ceremony, to thank God. In a Spanish country where most are catholic, the prayers of the miners, their families, their countrymen and all of us watching 24 hour covereage on cable news, how can anyone ignore the fact that prayer is the answer. Honest to goodness faith, love and prayer saved these people. The “experts” watch the the men smiling and celebrating and still predict an awful outcome in the future where they will “undoubtedly” have nightmares and severe depression or debilitating desease. Some of the men are sick and very weak. Some will suffer, some may never go back to the mines but love and faith will not abandon them, now. Psychologists will study them for the next 10 or 20 years. I hope their is a seminary student out there somewhere that will follow them also and study the amazing grace that is the faith that illuminated 69 days of the darkest hours of those miners lives.

I am not sure how it happens when I think I cannot believe more than I already do… the wonder and awe I find in Jesus, still grows exponentially.

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Surviving the present crisis in the Church

Crucifixion of St. Peter

In the long history of the Church, many popes and bishops have had the same shortcomings as Peter, and with great damage to souls; but if it happens that we know of some like them in the Church today, we ought to be filled with the most profound compassion for them personally, while regretting, and perhaps protesting against their blindness. Their responsibility before God is incalculable, their souls are in great danger, and we have a corresponding duty to come to their aid by our prayers and penances.

What I have said about popes and bishops applies also, of course, though in lesser degree, to priests.  The tragedy is, as history shows that many unfortunate men consent to be made priests, bishops, or even popes, without taking seriously the doctrine of the Cross, or striving for the high sanctity which their state of life requires of them.  But the more a lay person perceives any of us fall short of what we ought to be, the more we need his prayers and compassion.

If the clergy have a duty to serve the faithful and set a Christ-like example, the faithful on their part have a corresponding duty to help sanctify the clergy by prayer and penance; and so, if they perceive defects in us but neglect to pray and to cover our  defects with charity, they stand in danger of being cursed by God in the way that Chaanan, the grandson of Noah was.  (Cf. 9.20-25)

Our Lord’s reaction to Peter’s attempt to give Him guidance was as sharp as it was instantaneous:  He turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan, you are a scandal to me; for you do not mind the things of God,  but those of men.” What a humiliation for the man to whom it has just been said that he would be the rock on which the Church would be built, and that he would be given charge of the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven!  But is there not a lesson here for all of us?

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Marine shot in head twice, survives, credits St. Michael the Archangel

Gunnery Sgt. Shelton, a 36-year-old veteran from Nashville, said he had never seen a Marine survive a direct shot to the head.

But next to him was Cpl. Christopher Ahrens, who quietly mentioned that two bullets had grazed his helmet the day the Marines attacked Marjah. The same thing, he said, happened to him three times in firefights in Iraq.

Cpl. Ahrens, 26, from Havre de Grace, Md., lifted the camouflaged cloth cover on his helmet, exposing the holes where the bullets had entered and exited.

He turned it over to display the picture card tucked inside, depicting Michael the Archangel stamping on Lucifer’s head. “I don’t need luck,” he said.

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