When the literal words of Jesus Christ simply aren’t good enough…

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Our Mother Who is Within Us

Cardinal Dolan at slain teacher’s funeral: “Like Jesus, Annie laid down her life for her friends.”

n New York, Cardinal Timothy Dolan told mourners at the funeral of 52-year-old Anne Marie Murphy that the teacher “brought together a community, a nation, a world, now awed by her own life and death.”

Murphy’s father, Hugh McGowan, said authorities told him that she died trying to protect her young pupils. Her body was found covering a group of children’s bodies as if to shield them, McGowan said.

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Scandalous “Catholic” school teacher claims Jesus never resurrected – but because He died in our honour we should be nice to each other.

“He told us people have taken the Bible too literally,” Sinicrope told LifeSiteNews in a recent interview. “He began saying that it was like a metaphor that you follow…He said that Jesus never resurrected.”

While the principal says an investigation has cleared the teacher of wrongdoing, another classmate has corroborated Sinicrope’s account.

During the week leading up to Easter this year the Catholic High School decided to place crosses in every classroom, recounted the teen.  Following Holy Thursday Mass, Francesca’s sociology teacher provided an explanation of the crosses to the whole class, saying that the same message would be given to all the classes.

Francesca’s video footage, posted on YouTube, recounts the events.  “He told my whole class that Jesus had never resurrected,” the 17 year-old said. “That is so unbelievable to me in a Catholic school.”

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Editor’s note: I’ve personally experienced the same thing … only from wacko religious education directors, deacons, and even priests … in allegedly Catholic parishes, located in the midwest.

One time, around thirty catechists sat around listening to a formation talk which was promoting various types of abject heresy, and not one of them uttered a word of protest. Finally realizing that this was no “Candid Camera” stunt, I strongly challenged the presenter’s opinions, yet received absolutely no support from all but one of the assembled catechists, many of whom certainly knew … or should have known better.

That was the day I shifted my efforts from teaching Catholic kids to better educating adult Catholics.

Later, I discovered that the presenter was widely known as a blatant heretic, but since the bishop didn’t care, neither did anyone else.

As far as I know, that person is still employed as a director of religious education in a Catholic parish! Many of these types possess Master’s degrees from allegedly “Catholic” universities, and are highly paid, too.

Because I Don’t Work For You: Notes from the East Coast Fraternity Exercises 2011

One young woman’s story moved me deeply because I found in her story traces of my own experiences.  Who among us has not faced an unfair boss or the struggle to be recognized in the work place?

This March, M. , a recently married middle school science teacher, let the principal at her school know she was pregnant, figuring the supervisor would have time to find a maternity-leave replacement for her when she gave birth in September.

Instead, she was fired.

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Joliet Catholic basketball coach dies suddenly at 29

(JOLIET) Jeremy Izzo, a history teacher and the boys varsity basketball coach at Joliet Catholic Academy, died suddenly Friday, school officials said. He was 29.

“Jeremy was a great guy. He was a man of character,” said JCA Principal Jeffrey Budz on Saturday. “He was a great coach and a great teacher. He will be truly missed by our school. This is a shock to the Joliet Catholic Academy community.”

Budz was on his way to a Saturday evening prayer service in which Izzo was to be remembered. The principal said he was unsure of the exact cause of death.

Izzo came to JCA in 2009 with a strong endorsement from Bruce Weber, men’s basketball coach at the University of Illinois. While attending Illinois, Izzo had worked for Weber’s staff as a student manager, graduate assistant and finally as the game analysis coordinator specializing in video.

Before Weber became coach, Izzo had worked as a student manager for Coaches Lon Kruger and Bill Self.

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Idiot teacher “comes out” as an atheist, wonders why she was fired from teaching job at Catholic school.

Nurre said she was called into the principal’s office just before winter break and asked about Atheist Nexus, a social network that bills itself as site for “nontheists.”

She said she registered on the site on her personal computer at home. She noted a New York Times‘ article reporting the government had spent $2.3 million on prayer research since 2000 and added the link.

“I never thought something like that would jeopardize my job,” she said Friday from Phoenix, Ariz., where she was applying for teaching jobs.

Nurre was suspended by Monsignor Kevin McCoy and later fired by the school board for violating a policy that prohibits employees from advocating “principles contrary” to the teachings of the church.

St. Edmonds took the “appropriate action,” Kristie Arlt, spokeswoman for the Sioux City Diocese, said of the math teacher.

“The main thing is that she stated she didn’t believe in God,” Arlt said. “It’s pretty hard to put that same teacher in front of students in a Catholic school system.”

Nurre said her views constantly evolve and that she is constantly trying to expand her knowledge, whether on religion, astrology, fitness or politics.

“I just like learning about it. I don’t see why that should cause someone to get fired,” she said.

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Despite what the USCCB apparently maintains, there is no right to national health care in authentic Catholic doctrine

It is important to emphasize that this is not a mere pragmatic consideration. For a central government, or any level of government, to intervene when it is unnecessary for it to do so is not merely not required. It is not merely unwise. It is, in the words of Pius XI, nothing less than an “injustice,”“gravely wrong,” a “grave evil and disturbance of right order.” It is disturbing, then, that the USCCB does not balance its emphasis on the Church’s teaching about the “right to medical care” with equal emphasis on the principle of subsidiarity – a principle which has a longer history in Catholic social teaching than the (very recent) affirmation of a “right to medical care,” and which has a much more sophisticated and worked out theoretical basis in Catholic moral theology and natural law theory than the latter right has ever been given. (Astonishingly, the USCCB’s online summary of the basic principles of Catholic social teaching includes no reference to subsidiarity at all; and its more extended online overview of Catholic social teaching mentions subsidiarity only once, in passing, without explaining what it means.)

In particular, it is disturbing that no consideration of subsidiarity or the rights of the family seems to have informed the USCCB position on the health care bill, which, as I have noted already, seems to allow that the bill is acceptable or even required by Catholic teaching apart from the elements concerning abortion and coverage of illegal immigrants. How does respect for a “right to medical care” justify the federal government forcing every citizen to buy insurance, of a kind the government (rather than parents or individuals generally) decides the citizen needs? How does it justify increasing government power to determine for citizens what sorts of treatments are worth paying for? How does it justify moving towards a de facto monopoly as health insurance companies are transformed into heavily regulated government contractors? How does it justify the bill’s “marriage penalties”? Even apart from considerations of subsidiarity and the independence of the family, it is hard to see how such policies could be justified; in light of those considerations the policies seem positively immoral. Add to that the bill’s staggering increase to the already crushing debt we are facing, the dubious constitutionality of some of its components, the rushed and irresponsible way a transformation of one-sixth of the economy was cobbled together for political reasons without sufficient attention to unforeseen consequences, and the bill’s Rube Goldberg system of bribes and special breaks – as well as the USCCB letter’s admission that the bishops are “not politicians, policy experts or legislative tacticians” and thus without any special competence vis-à-vis the practical side of health care policy – and it becomes mystifying why the USCCB should think that, apart from the matter of abortion, the bill is something to “applaud” (as Cardinal George put it). The bill is not even an improvement on the existing system; it’s not even equally bad. As Steve Burton points out, it takes what is already wrong with the existing system and doubles down on it.

Read the article by Edward Feser