Exquisite timing of “Miracle Priest’s” appearance reveals God’s loving providence

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After officials allowed him to approach the accident, Dowling reached his arm well into the car to touch Lentz’s head with oil. “Through this holy anointing may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit,” he said. “May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up.”

The prayer was the Anointing of the Sick, an ancient ritual with roots in Judaism that is one of Catholicism’s seven sacraments.

As the priest walked away from the Mercedes, Lentz — a member of an Assemblies of God Pentecostal church — asked him to return and pray aloud with her, which he did. He then moved out of the way so rescue efforts could resume.

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Submitted by Bob Stanley

Editor’s note: From an obscure corner of the planet we witness a kind of genuine Ecumenism, as a Catholic priest lives the Gospel, ministering to a person of faith, in her time of greatest need.

This “grand coincidence” serves as a very timely reminder of God’s inestimable love, tender mercies and unbounded providence.

The Heavens and the Earth rejoice, as we give Him thanks and praise!

“Catchy” new Planned Parenthood ad campaign: “Your baby will thank you.” (For killing his brothers and sisters?)

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Or perhaps they are referring to the babies who are aborted?

Thanks, mom – for having me killed before I was even born. Life would have been so much trouble!

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Prayer must include praise, thanks, pope says

VATICAN CITY — Prayer should not center just on asking God to fulfill one’s hopes and desires, but must include praise, thanks and trust in God’s plan which may not match one’s own, Pope Benedict XVI said.

The way Jesus prayed to his Father “teaches us that in our own prayers, we must always trust in the Father’s will and strive to see all things in light of his mysterious plan of love,” he said during his weekly general audience Dec. 14.

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Editor’s note: 1-Give God thanks and praise; 2-Tell God you’re sorry for your sins and promise to try to do better, in the future; 3-Ask for what you need, in as much explicit detail as possible; 4-Believe you will indeed receive for what you have prayed … otherwise, what’s the point of faith; 5-Repeat, as necessary.

This process is designed to help us align our fickle, fallible, human will with God’s perfect will and plan. Since God certainly knows his own mind, and he already knows precisely what we need, long before we typically manage to discern it, the results of prayer are invariably positive, even if we might initially fail to recognize how or why that can be.