The new Cosmos television series and the ongoing war between faith and science.

galaxy

“Everyone” knew the earth was the center of the universe?

Wow, who’s going to tell Copernicus? Kepler? Stigliola? Diggs? Maestlin? Rothmann? Brahe? All of them believed in models of the cosmos that were not considered orthodox, and lived at the time of Bruno. All of them escaped the fire, and indeed weren’t even pursued by the Inquisition. Right here we have the major lie at the heart of modern anti-religious scientific propaganda: the war between faith and science.

We’re supposed to just assume this ignorant backwards world of the past hates smart people. Tyson himself says it matter-of-factly: “How was [Bruno] spending New Year’s Eve [in 1599]? In prison, of course.”

Of course! Because that’s what the Church does to smart people! Bad church! Bad!

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Editor’s note: The truth is, there existed at the time, no way of scientifically proving or disproving many of the theories these men (including Galileo and his telescope) proposed. If our understanding of the Sacred Scriptures needed to be reinterpreted, the Church first demanded real proof. There was none – and there would not be for many, many years.

When people began to promote their unproven and as yet, unverifiable theories as dogma, the Church said no. When some of them persisted, they were sanctioned in various ways.

The rest of the truth is that many of the theories these men promoted eventually proved to be – at least in part – false and/or scientifically incorrect, in many aspects. Not surprising, since no way existed (at that time) to definitively prove or disprove them.

That’s something the pro-science/anti-church guys always seem to conveniently leave out!

Galileo was wrong: The Bible does not teach how the Heavens go … but rather, how to go to Heaven

Science, Galileo and the Catholic Church

  

What does Psalm 23, the Godfather Movie, and the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ have in common?

“If Jesus was God, why did he say ‘“My God, My God, why have you forsaken Me?’  Doesn’t that prove that even Jesus didn’t think he was God.”

I waited for the other guy to respond as the question was directed at him but I could see from the look on his face that he had never considered this question.  The questioner had a look of victory on his face.  I jumped in.

“I can answer that.  Leave the gun, take the cannoli.”

I got the desired reaction, blank stares.

“Let me clarify.  Take it to the mattresses.”

More blank stares.

“When I say these things to you, what am I quoting?”

“The Godfather,” they all responded at once.

“How do you know?”

“We just do.  Everybody knows those lines.”

“Exactly.  As 21st century Americans, I can pretty much count on the fact that we all have the same frames of cultural reference.  So when Jesus said ‘My God, my God…’ he also knew that his audience would automatically understand him.  The problem isn’t that Jesus didn’t know He was God.  The problem is that you are not first century Jews.”

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Refuting those who attempt to use the Bible to defend homosexuality

Lot and the fiery destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah

Editor’s note: This article is one that is certainly worth reading, since just about every verbal ploy used by homosexuals to attempt to justify their seriously disordered and immoral behavior is identified and successfully refuted.

Does the Bible Condemn Homosexuality?

An Interview with Dr. Reverend Cheri DiNovo. As the interview with Dr. DiNovo is conducted, Robert Sungenis will provide rebuttal to DiNovo’s arguments.

Seen on the web: “I can resist anything … except temptation”

Can a person be trained to resist temptation?

While designing role playing games more suited to kindergarten than marriage therapy, the scientists finally concluded:  “…your commitment may depend on how much a partner enhances your life and broadens your horizons.”

In other words, “If you don’t satisfy me, honey, I’m out of here!”

It astounds me that in this study of betrayal in marriage, not even once do words like wrong or evil appear.  Needless to say, neither do the words sin or God.

The character Ivan Karamazov in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov seems to decide that God doesn’t exist and that therefore, logically, nothing can be judged as wrong or immoral.  Those researchers at their universities would agree.

However, the Torah does not.  A marriage is not just a contract between two parties.  It is a holy covenant between three entities: man, woman, and God.

One spouse might believe that an extra-marital fling will complete his or her life while the other spouse is convinced that such a fling is destructive. Who is to say which belief is more compelling?  But there is one more party to the marriage—God!  And He is pretty unambiguous about it.

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Submitted by Doria2

Interesting Catholic Questions and Answers on Baptism and Salvation

Q: I was taught from other Christian churches that baptism must be by immersion, but the Catholics sprinkle. I see nowhere in the Bible (that I can find) where it specifically states there is a certain way to be baptized, just that is says by water . Can you tell me if there is any material on the matter or is that an “open to interpretation” thing?

A: In the Didache, pronounced dee-dah-kay, which is one of the earliest, if not the earliest, non–scriptural Christian writings, it says this about Baptism: “The procedure for baptizing is as follows: after repeating all that has been said, immerse in running water ‘In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost’. If no running water is available, immerse in ordinary water…If neither is practicable, then pour water three times on the head ‘In the name of the Father…”

Again, this is not Scripture, but this is a window into the practices of the early Christians who learned directly from the Apostles and those appointed by the Apostles to leadership roles within the Church. They were baptizing folks by immersion and by pouring, or sprinkling.

Ezekiel 36:25–27, I will SPRINKLE clean water upon you and you shall be clean from all your uncleannesses, and from all your idols I will cleanse you. A new heart I will give you, and a new spirit I will put within you…and I will put My Spirit within you…” What do you think is being talked about here? Water…a new spirit…cleansed of your uncleannesses? Baptism…by sprinkling. Nowhere in the Bible does it say one has to be immersed in order to be officially baptized. People will point to Jesus’ baptism accounts which say that He “came up out of the water,” and use that to claim He was immersed. However, if you read all four of the accounts of Jesus’ baptism side–by–side, you can make a very strong case that when it says, Jesus “came up out of the water,” it does not mean He came up from under the water (immersion), but rather that it means He came up out of the river onto the bank. If you had a child swimming in a pool and you called to them and they “came up out of the water,” what would that mean? That your child was underwater but is now above water, or that he had come out of the pool altogether? It would be the latter.

Finally, in 1 Cor 15:29, Paul notes that there were folks baptizing on behalf of the dead. And, he doesn’t specifically repudiate the practice. So, the Scripture tells us that there were Christians baptizing folks on behalf of the dead and nowhere does the Scripture say this should not happen. Paul himself offers no criticism of the practice. Why then does anyone believe that baptizing on behalf of the dead is not an acceptable Christian practice? Why? Because of the authority of the Church to decide such matters. Just as the Church can say that baptism on behalf of the dead is not acceptable, in spite of it clearly being practiced by some Christians in Scripture, so the Church can decide on the method of baptism. It has Christ’s own authority to bind and loose on earth. And, what it binds and looses on earth, is bound and loosed in Heaven.

By the way, one can always elect to be fully immersed when baptized into the Catholic Church, and I know of folks who have done so. In other words, immersion is not a practice that is forbidden by the Church, it is just one that is not used as often as pouring.

Q: Jesus said: “No one can enter the Kingdom of God without being born of water and the Spirit’ (John 3:3–5). I have seen a good number of non–Christians living a righteous life. Will they not enter the Kingdom of God?

A: The Church teaches, as God clearly states in John 3, that Baptism is necessary for salvation. The Church also believes that God wants all men to be saved, and therefore gives all men the opportunity for salvation. The ordinary means of salvation is through the Sacraments (beginning with Baptism) given to us by God through His Church. But, the Church holds out the possibility that there is some “extraordinary” means of salvation known only unto God, by which those who are not physically baptized may still receive the grace of salvation through Christ Jesus. As St. Paul says in Rom 2, when speaking about those who have not the law, “…their conscience also bears witness and their conflicting thoughts accuse or perhaps excuse them on that day when, according to my gospel, God judges the secrets of men by Christ Jesus.” Their ignorance may excuse them or it may accuse them.

The Church teaches that non–Christians who are invincibly ignorant of the truths about Jesus Christ and His Church, “may” be saved. In other words, it is possible for them to be saved, if they are indeed righteous, if they have never been told about Jesus, and had no way of finding out about Him and thereby believing in Him. If, however, they have been exposed to Christ, and know something of the claims of Christianity, yet have either rejected those claims or not investigated those claims (willful ignorance), then they may indeed have a difficult time come Judgment Day.

This is why it is so incumbent upon us, as Catholics, to do all in our power to bring Christ to the world, to bring Truth to the world. The best chance any person has to be with God in Heaven for all of eternity is to be a Catholic who is devout, regularly receives the Sacraments, and does all in their power to be holy. It is difficult enough to be holy with all the graces available to us as Catholics, how much more difficult for those who do not have Baptism, who do not regularly go to Confession, and who do not regularly receive the Body and Blood of Christ in the Eucharist Therefore, we cannot simply sit back and say, “Well, these are good people, surely God will take them to Heaven even though they are not Christian.” That is gambling with someone’s soul based on a personal opinion, or on a “feeling.”

By our Baptism we are all called to evangelize. If it’s not something we are comfortable doing, then we need to pray to God to give us the strength and the wisdom to get out there and do it anyway. The lives of souls are at stake.

No one can say whether or not someone will end up in Hell, that is a judgment reserved for God alone. However, one can indeed say that getting to Heaven is not an easy thing and that we need all the graces possible in order to persevere in holiness to the end, and that the greatest graces available to us are found in and through the Sacraments. Therefore, one can conclude that those outside of the Sacraments have the odds stacked against them.

Look at the date when Augustine said this:

Augustine “There are three ways in which sins are forgiven: in baptism, in prayer, and in the greater humility of penance (Sermons to Catechumens, on the Creed 7:15 [A.D. 395]).

Submitted by Doria2

Article points out the fact that Jesus spoke quite extensively and definitively on the evils of homosexual behavior

jesusreading

… “Jesus said nothing about homosexuality.” In fact, Jesus most certainly has said a lot about it. The Catechism of the Catholic Church reminds us, “God is the author of Sacred Scripture” (CCC 105). One source for this is 2 Timothy 3:16, which asserts, “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching.” Therefore, Jesus, as the second person of the Holy Trinity, has spoken on the issue of homosexuality, not only through natural law, but through the Bible (via Leviticus, Romans 1, and 1 Cor. 6, among others).

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