Gospel reflection: In the Old Testament, men found their spouses at wells.

 

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“Give me a drink.”

In the Old Testament, men found their spouses at wells—Moses meets Zipporah, Isaac meets Rebecca, and Jacob meets the beautiful Rachel at watering holes. And so, again at Jacob’s well, a woman comes up, alone, and Jesus is thirsty. Mother Teresa described the thirst of Jesus: “I Thirst is something much deeper than Jesus just saying ‘I love you.’ Even more—he longs for you. He misses you when you don’t come close.” The Samaritan woman approaches, and Jesus draws her close to him. How does He do it?

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Submitted by Bob Stanley

Seen on the web: Uncommon wisdom.

Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.*

*On the other hand … Catholics know that the body, blood, soul and divinity of our Lord, Jesus Christ is reserved in the tabernacle of every Catholic Church … and Jesus … by means of his grace … promises to one day, transform all of the faithful into the glory of God.

So, merely “showing up” in a Catholic church places us in the real presence of God. And God, with our cooperation, can make us into anything he wants!

Submitted by Sharon F.

Series of four inspirational articles about Heaven isn’t quite Catholic, but pretty close.


New Heaven and New Earth united (Part 1)

Heaven a secret? (Part 2)

Heaven — God’s home and man’s destiny (Part 3)

Heaven — we were made for planet earth (Part 4)


What is the purpose of salvation?

Q: What is the purpose of salvation?

What do you get from salvation in Christ? What do you get out of it? Do you live a good life and go to heaven? I mean, is that it? What about in Revelation, where they talk about the new heaven and the new earth, where humans will have new bodies? Anyone know about this? How can people come back from the dead and live on earth, when on the earth you are temporal beings, that will eventually die? What is the point of coming back from the dead?

A: Salvation is a form of eternal life. The BEST form.

God promises to share everything he is and everything he has with those who love him, subject to virtually NO limitations.

At the 2nd coming of Jesus Christ, the earth as we now know it, will be transformed into something like the glory of heaven, as will our mortal bodies.

The dead will be instantly resurrected. The living will be instantly transformed.

Suitably equipped and provisioned by God, man will be judged, and the “saved” will exist for eternity with God on the newly renovated earth, in glorified bodies (thought to be much like Jesus’ resurrected body) that are compatible with both heavenly and earthly realities.

No more sin. No more death. No more suffering. Eternal life in the Kingdom of God, just as was always intended.

There is a Freedom in Holiness

A more helpful and true understanding of the Christian moral life and of Christian moral norms is that they are descriptions of what a transformed human being is like. What begins to happen to a person who is indwelt by the Spirit of Christ? What do they look like, act like? What are their priorities and attitudes? In other words what begins to happen to a person in whom Jesus Christ really beings to live and whom he is transforming? In the great moral treatise of the Lord known as the Sermon on the Mount Jesus is not merely giving negative prescriptions (not to be angry, not to look lustfully, not to divorce or swear oaths, etc). Rather he is describing the transformed human person. Such a person has authority over their anger (Mt 5:22); has the courage to be reconciled to others around him (5:24); has authority over his thought life (5:28) and sexuality (5:28); loves his or her spouse (5:31); Is a man of his word (5:34); is not revengeful, feels no need to retaliate (5:39ff); and loves everyone, even his enemies (5:43ff). This is but a partial description of a human being not only being transformed but also set free from deep drives of sin like anger, greed, lust, pride, envy, gluttony, sloth, resentments, hatred, fears, bitterness, self-centeredness, egotism, bad priorities, worldliness and the like.

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Was Christ’s physical body resurrected from the dead or did He rise an immaterial spirit?

Q: Was Christ’s physical body resurrected from the dead or did He rise an immaterial spirit?

A: The resurrection was the supernatural transformation of Jesus’ physical body into a higher form of physical body that was compatible with both heaven and earth, and that could exist in the near presence of God.

Gnostics believe in a purely spiritual resurrection, not understanding that such a thing would be no resurrection at all.

Here’s what St. Augustine had to say about it:

“Christ demonstrated justice by His death, He promised power by His resurrection. What could be more just than to go as far as the death of the cross, for the sake of justice?

What greater act of power than to rise from the dead, and ascend to heaven with the very flesh in which He was slain?”

“First, justice conquered the devil, then power; justice, because Christ had no sin and was most unjustly put to death by the devil; power, because He lived again after death, never to die thereafter.”

 

Where Transformation Can Lead – by Mark Earley

 

photo: New York Times 

Where Transformation Can Lead  – by Mark Earley

March 11, 2008 

You probably saw the catch on TV. Or maybe you saw it on the cover of Sports Illustrated. The grab made by New York Giants wide receiver David Tyree may be the greatest catch in Super Bowl history. It certainly was a pivotal moment in the Giants’ victory over the New England Patriots. But it was not the most pivotal moment in young David Tyree’s life. That would be when Tyree found himself behind bars in a jail cell. “What looked to be the lowest point in my life ended up being the greatest thing that ever happened to me,” Tyree told the New York Times, referring to his 2004 arrest.

For more on this … go here:

http://www.catholicexchange.com/node/70439+

This update courtesy of BreakPoint.

Submitted by: Doria2 with thanks to Gregory K.