Amazing video: Dashboard camera records the Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

Yu Muroga was doing his job making deliveries when the 11 March 2011 earthquake hit in Japan.

Unaware, like many people in the area, of how far inland the Tsunami would travel, he continued to drive and do his job.

The HD camera mounted on his dashboard captured not only the earthquake, but also the moment he and several other drivers were suddenly engulfed in the Tsunami.

He escaped from the vehicle seconds before it was crushed by other debris and sunk underwater. His car and the camera have only recently been recovered by the police. The camera was heavily damaged but a video expert was able to retrieve this footage.

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51-foot-high gate, criticized as wasteful public works project, successfully protected Japanese town from tsunami.

In the rubble of Japan’s northeast coast, one small village stands as tall as ever after the tsunami. No homes were swept away. In fact, they barely got wet.

Fudai is the village that survived — thanks to a huge wall once deemed a mayor’s expensive folly and now vindicated as the community’s salvation.

The 3,000 residents living between mountains behind a cove owe their lives to a late leader who saw the devastation of an earlier tsunami and made it the priority of his four-decade tenure to defend his people from the next one.

His 51-foot (15.5-meter) floodgate between mountainsides took a dozen years to build and meant spending more than $30 million in today’s dollars.

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Japan’s Atomic Samurai

The Fukushima 50, who actually are a group of about 300 people who have been working in shifts of 50, have become heroes in Japan and are known as atomic “samurai.”

Speaking to Fox News by phone via an interpreter, the mother of a 32-year-old worker said her son had told her they must have been exposed to lethal doses of radiation.

“My son and his colleagues have discussed it at length and they have committed themselves to die if necessary to save the nation,” she said. Fox News said she was tearful as she spoke.

“He told me they have accepted they will all probably die from radiation sickness in the short term or cancer in the long-term,” she added.

“They have concluded between themselves that it is inevitable some of them may die within weeks or months. They know it is impossible for them not to have been exposed to lethal doses of radiation,” she said.

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Amazing street level tsunami video shows incomprehensible devastation

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Submitted by Doria2

Tsunami Was More Than 77 Feet High At Its Peak

“A Tsunami wave that hit a coastal city in Iwate Prefecture after the March 11 massive earthquake is estimated to have reached 23.6 meters in height, a government-commissioned field survey by the Port and Airport Research Institute showed Wednesday,” Kyodo News reports.

Seen from above, the awesome scale of Japan’s destruction (big photo gallery)

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Catholic diocese first victim of quake

The Catholic diocese of Sendai was the first victim of Japan’s tsunami following the earthquake. Covering a land area of 27864 square miles, the diocesan territory includes the cities of Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima. Initial reports suggest that Miyagi and Fukushima were the first to fall victim to the 33ft tsunami caused by the megaquake. In Sendai, where a major oil terminal exploded when its cooling system failed, Catholics form 0.15% of the total population of 7,207,624. In Tokyo Catholics are 0.51% of a total population of 18,552,995 people. In both cities, the predominant religions are Shinto and Buddhism.

There are approximately 509,000 Catholics in Japan, of whom 10,944 are in the diocese of Sendai and a further 95,877 in the archdiocese of Tokyo, which also felt the force of the earthquake even though it is situated more than 250 miles from its epicenter.

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Tsunami: Everything You Might Like To Know

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