Campus outreach empowers young couple to choose life: “I’m not going to kill my daughter or son.”

From the Center for Bio-Ethical Reform:

Columbus, OH – Mar. 22, 2011 – “I’m not going to kill my daughter or son,” the Florida International University (FIU) student declared.  He then admitted that just moments before, when he and his pregnant girlfriend had approached CBR’s campus outreach exhibit, they were considering having an abortion.  After viewing the images and encountering CBR volunteer Thama, that option became unthinkable.

The man turned to his girlfriend: “We need to talk.”

Had this young couple not encountered the exhibit, their preborn child could have been scheduled today for an abortion.  CBR’s combination of the graphic truth of abortion and respectful conversation works.

Even students who disagree with CBR’s message can appreciate the effectiveness of our display.  FIU’s student newspaper quoted law student Oren Reich as saying, “I’m pro-choice, but think the exhibit was honest, compelling and non-offensive.  Comparisons to genocide are appropriate considering their beliefs, and gory imagery is appropriate as well, just as I would use it for an anti-war demonstration.”

To view pictures of the outreach at FIU, click here.

Check out these articles and opinion pieces from FIU’s university paper:

·         “University visited by controversial exhibit”

·         “Abortion display done in poor taste, misleading”

·         “Abortion display, while graphic, within its rights”

Help us reach more young couples considering abortion.  Click HERE to give electronically.

Or send a check to:

CBR

PO Box 360503

Columbus, OH 43236

Seen on the web: How University Betrays Students.

Modern Western “culture” is based on the fraudulent assumptions of the “Enlightenment,” an intellectual movement dating from the Eighteenth Century. This in turn was the product of the Illuminist program to create a new(secular) world order by denying the existence of God and immutable natural and spiritual laws.

In practice this means Arts students study a bunch of atheists who are presented as if they were Gods. Their professors act as high priests.

Like deaf men tuning a piano, they try to explain the human condition without any reference to the Creator, Design or man’s Divine Spirit.

They portray mankind as a forlorn animal in an amoral world, characterized by a merciless struggle for survival.

They celebrate human “freedom” by which they mean the freedom to reject God’s Order, indulge animal appetites, and create an alienated and dysfunctional personal reality.

Illuminism is the Luciferian doctrine of Freemasonry. (Communism is another product of Illuminism. All leading Communists were Freemasons.) The mortar board that university graduates wear is a symbol of Freemasonry. Black gowns symbolize the occult. Arts students are unwittingly and gradually being inducted into a Luciferian/Communist cult.

God represents moral and spiritual absolutes like love, truth, goodness, harmony and justice. Belief in their reality is essential for our healthy development. While our culture pays lip service to them (this is how fraud works), it is frankly devoted to their demise.

Link

Left-wing Jesuits at America have finally “lost it”

america

According to the editors of America Magazine:

Four steps are necessary for the U.S. church to escape the strengthening riptide of sectarian conflict and re-establish trust between universities and the hierarchy. First, the bishops’ discipline about speakers and awards at Catholic institutions should be narrowed to exclude from platforms and awards only those Catholics who explicitly oppose formal Catholic teaching. Second, in politics we must reaffirm the distinction between the authoritative teaching of moral principles and legitimate prudential differences in applying principles to public life. Third, all sides should return to the teaching of the Second Vatican Council and Pope Paul VI that in politics there are usually several ways to attain the same goals. Finally, church leaders must promote the primacy of charity among Catholics who advocate different political options. For as the council declared, “The bonds which unite the faithful are mightier than anything which divides them” (“Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World,” No. 92).

Editor’s note: What are these guys smoking?

Here’s my four steps: 1) Keep those who advocate immoral and non-Catholic political and/or religious positions OUT of Catholic universities, no matter WHO they might be and no matter with whom they might be associated. 2) Keep those who advocate positions contrary to the authentic teachings of the Catholic Church (ESPECIALLY POLITICIANS and Professors) as far away from Catholic universities as possible. 3) Religion is not politics. Abortion is not health care. Universities should prepare students to be able to tell the difference. Christ demands that we Catholics know the truth and stand up for it … on campus or off. 4) Sometime, loving one’s neighbor means engaging in fraternal correction … especially when it comes to fundamental issues like abortion. Students need to know that there is no common ground between life and death. Both are absolute opposites. Charity demands that Catholics choose life, without reservation.

The guys at America should know better! Abortion remains primarily an ethical and moral issue that has so far claimed the lives of nearly a third of today’s under thirty population.

Abortion is no more a political issue than the Holocaust was, during World War II. Abortion remains the greatest moral evil of our times.

Pro-death politicians and the editors of America would LIKE us to believe that abortion is a political issue, but many of us are simply NOT that stupid! Abortion is a totally immoral act that just happens to have been temporarily decriminalized by a corrupt government.  But it will not stand, forever.  

Until then, we fight.

Want dialogue? Stop the killing. Then we can talk!

Read their editorial

MINNESOTA PROF PLEDGES TO DESECRATE EUCHARIST

July 10, 2008

MINNESOTA PROF PLEDGES TO DESECRATE EUCHARIST

Paul Zachary Myers, a professor at the University of Minnesota Morris, has pledged to desecrate the Eucharist. He is responding to what happened recently at the University of Central Florida when a student walked out of Mass with the Host, holding it hostage for several days. Myers was angry at the Catholic League for criticizing the student. His post can be accessed from his faculty page on the university’s website.

Here is an excerpt of his July 8 post, “It’s a Frackin’ Cracker!”:

“Can anyone out there score me some consecrated communion wafers?” Myers continued by saying, “if any of you would be willing to do what it takes to get me some, or even one, and mail it to me, I’ll show you sacrilege, gladly, and with much fanfare. I won’t be tempted to hold it hostage (no, not even if I have a choice between returning the Eucharist and watching Bill Donohue kick the pope in the balls, which would apparently be a more humane act than desecrating a goddamned cracker), but will instead treat it with profound disrespect and heinous cracker abuse, all photographed and presented here on the web.”

Catholic League president Bill Donohue responded as follows:

“The Myers blog can be accessed from the university’s website. The university has a policy statement on this issue which says that the ‘Contents of all electronic pages must be consistent with University of Minnesota policies, local, state and federal laws.’ One of the school’s policies, ‘Code of Conduct,’ says that ‘When dealing with others,’ faculty et al. must be ‘respectful, fair and civil.’ Accordingly, we are contacting the President and the Board of Regents to see what they are going to do about this matter. Because the university is a state institution, we are also contacting the Minnesota legislature.

“It is hard to think of anything more vile than to intentionally desecrate the Body of Christ. We look to those who have oversight responsibility to act quickly and decisively.”

Contact President Robert Bruininks at bruin001@umn.edu