Home schooling mom claims her world is more real than yours

People sometimes (with a straight face, mind you) accuse my husband and I of “depriving” or even “abusing” our children by homeschooling them in a rural setting. How, they wonder, will our girls ever adapt to the (cough) “real” world if they don’t have the socialization opportunities of school? What do you mean we don’t have television reception in our home? How will our kids ever learn what kind of behavior is expected of them unless they watch such intellectually lofty programs as “Glee” and “Gossip Girl”?

The implication is because our children are growing up valuing modesty, self-control, honor and self-respect, they are maladjusted little twits who will end up as drooling misguided troglodytes with the collective social skills of, say, wood lice.

Then I see a television program and realize why some people think our parental methods are destructive. We’re raising our girls far, far away from the “real” world.

In the “real” world of modern America, girls are raunchy sexual creatures whose sole purpose from toddler-hood on up is to dress provocatively, adorn their bodies with tattoos, piercings and make-up, and whose sole goal in life, apparently, is to find out how many boys they can bed.

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Obedience is the virtue that allows the obedient to share in the authority of the commander.


Read “The Power of Obedience”

Pope Benedict XVI on faith, error

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“Faith itself is endowed with inner certainty, strengthened by the testimony of the saints and the inspiration of the Holy Spirit in the hearts of believers, and in case of doubt, by the exercise of the Magisterium of the Church.”

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Editor’s note: Let’s not forget that faith is a virtue … and without God’s grace … which comes from God the Father, through the power of the Holy Spirit, according to the salvific work of Jesus Christ, because God loves us … faith in the one, true God … would be absolutely impossible.

Matthew 11:27 All things are delivered to me by my Father. And no one knoweth the Son but the Father: neither doth any one know the Father, but the Son, and he to whom it shall please the Son to reveal him.

John 6:44 No man can come to me, except the Father, who hath sent me, draw him. And I will raise him up in the last day.

John 6:65 And he said: Therefore did I say to you that no man can come to me, unless it be given him by my Father.

Acts 11:17 If then God gave them the same grace as to us also who believed in the Lord Jesus Christ: who was I, that could withstand God?

On the Proper Integration of Anger into the Virtuous Life

Sorrow at evil without anger at evil is a fault, a fault that the Catholic bishops have repeatedly fallen into in their handling of sexual abuse and that the late pope fell into when he tolerated the bishops’ faults. Until just anger is directed at the bishops, until bishops (including the pope) feel just anger at their fellow bishops who have disgraced and failed their office, the state of sin in the Church continues.

Virtue Without a Name

Meekness, which is the virtue that moderates anger, is misunderstood as passivity. Moses angrily confronting Pharaoh was the meekest of men, because he moderated the plagues to allow Pharaoh time to repent. Meekness moderates anger so that it is in accord with reason. Since most people suffer from an excess of anger, the virtue that increases anger in those who are deficient in it so that it is in accord with reason does not have a name, but it needs one.

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Note to Congress: Real freedom is the choosing of the good.

050514-F-7203T-005One should not be worried about whether one is free, but rather about what one does with that freedom. There is no virtue in being free; the virtue comes in the actions that stem from our freedom of choice. Real freedom is the choosing of the good.

-St. Augustine

What about so-called “gay marriage”? Why is that wrong?

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Q: What about so-called “gay marriage”? Why is that wrong?

A: First, with regards to individuals who have an exclusive or predominant sexual attraction to persons of the same sex, they, as with each and every human person, share the dignity of an individual for whom Jesus Christ the Son of God willingly laid down his life and died on the Cross.

Such individuals, our brothers and sisters who have a same sex attraction, “must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided. These persons are called to fulfill God’s will in their lives and, if they are Christians, to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord’s Cross the difficulties they may encounter.”6

As with every other human person, people who have a same sex attraction are called to be saints and to share in the eternal beatitude with the Holy Trinity through the practice of virtue (necessarily including chastity) and a sacramental life of following Jesus Christ in and through His Church.

As with any temptation, the inclination to homosexual acts is not sinful. However, the Church has always declared homosexual acts themselves to be “‘intrinsically disordered.’ They are contrary to the natural law. They close the sexual act to the gift of life. They do not proceed from a genuine affective and sexual complementarity. Under no circumstances can they be approved.”7 Thus, homosexual acts, are “sins gravely contrary to chastity,”8 and therefore, “all Catholics are obliged to oppose the legal recognition of homosexual unions.”9

In summary, “The Church teaches that respect for homosexual persons cannot lead in any way to approval of homosexual behaviour or to legal recognition of homosexual unions.”

This Catholic Q&A was furnished by Bishop Robert Morlino of the Madison, Wisconsin diocese.

The Art of Manly Virtue

July 7th, 2008

by Mickey Addison

The Art of Manly Virtue

It is a foregone conclusion in some corners of Western society that men and virtue are mutually exclusive things. Especially in our own American popular culture, men are more often presented as hapless perpetual adolescents or dimwitted loons who stumble their way through life haphazardly and without virtue. From television and film characters to homosexual politicians, we are force-fed a steady diet of men whom no one wants to respect.

We have exchanged our manly heroes for a vacant spot…there are precious few authentic men presented to us as role models in the modern culture. The trick is not to attempt to use modern culture as our touchstone.

One of the glories of our Catholic Faith, however, is that we’re not set adrift in modern culture. To extend the nautical metaphor just a bit further, as Christians we have Christ as the “keel” and the Church as our “rudder.” We have the benefit of looking back over 2,000 years of culture: at the contributions of the Saints and our beliefs to the building up of first the West, then later the entire world. When we ground ourselves in authentic culture, and not some sort of commercialized anti-culture, we can see that manly virtues really do have a place in our society… and that bumbling adolescent oaf presented in modern culture ought to be rejected out of hand.

What is “manly virtue” any way? Well, I suppose every man has his own idea about what that is. The Catechism of the Catholic Church defines virtue as the “habitual and firm disposition to do the good” (#1833). According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, the very meaning of the word “virtue” comes from the Latin “virtus” which means manliness or courage. Both words eventually find their root in the Latin word, “vir” which means “man.” Our language links virtue with manhood.

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Submitted by Doria2