Traditional sister: “Because we wear a visible sign of our consecration to Christ, students are less likely to misbehave around us and more likely to take what we say seriously.”

The sisters were as classic in their attitude about behavior and belief as in their attire. Yet, they were as youthful in approach – incorporating the latest technology into lesson plans – as they were in age, the average for the 116 members of their order, established in 1997, being 28 years.

They had neither boyfriends nor bank accounts – a “shock” to some of their adolescent charges – professing vows of chastity, poverty and obedience.

They personified goodness but portrayed a wicked sense of humor.

“At first, I didn’t know what to expect, but as I got to know them, I found they were kind, trustworthy, tough but fair and a lot of fun,” said junior Tarantino of San Rafael. “And when they say, ‘I’ll pray for you,’ it really means something!”

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Corapi’s religious order had been trying to get him to come back and “live in community”

CORAPI AND COMMUNITY LIFE

The bigger focus for many now, surrounds his life within the Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity. There were changes to the constitution in 1994 and they wanted him back in community. In the first interview you will hear Joan Frawley Desmond, who interviewed Corapi’s superior explain that in the beginning, when the founder permitted him to live in solitude and to preach, the arrangement was not for him to live in his own home. I am not entirely clear on how long SOLT has been trying to get him to live back in community, so if someone catches that, please drop it into the combox, and cite the source. Watch that interview to hear it explained by Desmond. This move to live in a home was a later development that he apparently took on himself, and may not necessarily have been what his community desired.

In the end, we learn that attempts to bring him back into community life did not get anywhere. This would not have meant giving up preaching as seems to be the assumption in some writings online. We see members of other communities like the Fathers of Mercy traveling all the time to speak, as well as members of the Dominicans, among others. What it would have meant was giving up the assets: the money, the ranch, the sports car, the business, personal possessions, and perhaps the most difficult of all, the power to do what he wanted, when he wanted, and how he wanted. I suspect media produced would have been more in line with what we see out of other religious orders.

This goes directly to the vow of obedience and I offer this most especially for those who are discerning a vocation. If a founder or religious superior makes a promise to a member, a future superior is not bound to honor that agreement. Rather, it is the other way around.

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