This Week’s Ask Alice: Catholic Church Critics, Michael Voris and Real Catholic TV.



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She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Andy Asks: I liked the recent Ask Alice answer about websites critical of the Catholic Church and I was wondering what you both thought of the Michael Voris Real Catholic TV site. His videos are tough on the Bishops but he sure loves our Holy Father.

Alice Responds: Michael Voris’ Real Catholic TV reaches the minds and hearts of an enormous online audience. You refer to his videos as “tough” while I call them “truthful.” And sometimes, the truth does hurt.

Although he is tough on errant bishops, Voris is equally outspoken about any bishop, priest, religious, or lay person who does not teach, practice, uphold and defend the Catholic faith. Michael is a man who loves God and speaks the truth.

“God is Spirit, and those who worship
must worship in Spirit and truth.”
(John 4:24)

The main reason I respect Michael is because as you said, “he sure loves our Holy Father.” Michael is faithful to the Pope, i.e., the Magisterium of our Church. His Real Catholic TV programs teach about Heaven and hell, Jesus and Mary, saints and sinners, angels and demons, good and evil.

Voris urges Catholics to receive the sacraments of Penance and Holy Eucharist frequently. Voris’ criticisms are not leveled against the Catholic Church, but chastise individuals whose bad behavior provides a disservice to the Body of Christ.

Sometimes, there is a razor fine line between constructive and destructive criticism of human beings who serve in church ministry.

Although Voris is often critical of misdeeds done by members of the clergy, he does not engage in calumny or character defamation. He doesn’t spread rumors or half-truths. Also, Voris speaks messages of support and encouragement to bishops, priests, religious, and laity who are faithful to the Church.

Here is my personal set of rubrics
for determining the efficacy of a Catholic commentator:

1) Does the Catholic commentator acknowledge the Pope as the head of the Church, the Vicar of Christ on Earth and believe in Papal infallibility? Does the commentator respect or malign our Holy Father?

2) Does the commentator uphold the teachings of the Catholic faith?

3) Is the criticism presented by the commentator aligned with the Mind of Christ?

“You must be clever as snakes and innocent as doves.” (Matthew 10:16)

4) Does the commentator exhibit a spirit of love and forgiveness? Or is he/she judgmental?

“If you want to avoid judgment,
stop passing judgment. Your verdict on others
will be the verdict passed on you.”
(Matthew 7:1-2)

5) Do the words of the commentator unite or divide the Body of Christ? Commentators who are negative and judgmental fail to nurture the Body of Christ. They spread paranoia and mistrust rather than the “be not afraid” attitude Jesus promoted.

A faithful Catholic commentator leads his/her listeners to Christ.

“You will know them by their deeds….you can tell a tree by its fruit.” (Matthew 7:16, 20)

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Doug Lawrence adds: It’s interesting that you mention Michael Voris, since neither Alice or I rate Real Catholic TV as a “dangerous” site. Respectfully critical perhaps … but certainly not outside the bounds of Canon 212 … and always faithful to the Magisterium.

We also have a link to Real Catholic TV on our site. (Depending on your screen resolution, links appear alphabetically, either to the right of, or just below the main content window.)

As you probably know, during the last six months we’ve sponsored and promoted two different personal appearances by Michael Voris, in the Chicago area. The last one was an all-day “Majesty of the Faith” program, and it was great!

You really ought to see/hear him in person, if you get the chance.

Of course, certain Catholic bishops and/or their diocesan staff members have been known to have opinions to the contrary … but there’s not too much we can do about that.

More about Michael Voris and Real Catholic TV

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

This Week’s Ask Alice: Important things to keep in mind when visiting non-Catholic websites.


Send A Question To Alice

She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Jola Writes: This site, http://www.gotquestions.org, has some interesting subjects, particularly on Catholic things, like going to confession. It may inspire you, possibly?  They seem to have an answer for everything !!!

Alice Answers: “GotQuestions.org” is a Protestant website. Its homepage explains that the statements about Catholicism were written by FORMER Catholics. Consequently, the opinions of these lapsed Catholic volunteers are not consistent with authentic Catholic beliefs, teachings and practices … particularly about the Sacrament of Penance … and they reflect an often subtle, yet consistent, anti-Catholic bias on most other things, as well.

Catholics must confess their sins to a priest because Jesus instituted the sacrament of Penance, which gave His apostles (and their duly ordained successors) the power to forgive sins: “If you forgive men’s sins, they are forgiven them; if you hold them bound, they are held bound.” (John 20:23)

Jesus also gave priests the authority to reconcile sinners with the Church: “All this has been done by God, who has reconciled himself to us through Christ and has given us the ministry of reconciliation.” (2 Corinthians 5:18)

The apostles were our first priests. Jesus instituted the sacraments of Holy Orders (the priesthood) and Holy Eucharist on Holy Thursday, at the Last Supper.

Sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? Then why does the Protestant website you cited, deny the need to confess one’s sins to a priest?

Most Protestants do not believe in an ordained priesthood, nor do they believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

Our Catholic religion is the oldest and ONLY Christian Church that was ever personally founded by Jesus Christ, while he still walked the earth, some 2000 years ago.

The oldest Protestant denomination was founded 1517 years later by Martin Luther, an excommunicated priest who broke away from the Catholic Church, to start his own religion.

Methodists, Baptists and Presbyterians are splinter groups that broke away from the Lutheran religion, while Catholicism is the only religion that maintains an unbroken line all the way back to Jesus Christ. This is known as “apostolic succession”, while the divine truths that have been faithfully handed down to us Catholics from Jesus and the apostles, are known as “the sacred deposit of faith”.

Only Catholics can trace our faith directly to Jesus Christ, who appointed St. Peter as His earthly successor, the Pope. By contrast, Martin Luther, John Wesley, John Smyth and John Knox are founders of modern, novel, Protestant religions, which do not recognize the Catholic hierarchy of the Pope, bishops and priests, and which also deny or misconstrue many other eternal, Christian truths.

Since Protestants do not have ordained priests, they also reject previously mentioned Biblical passages about confessing sins to a priest (as well as a host of other things.) In short, they simply choose to interpret the Scriptures differently than Catholics, based on purely personal beliefs and feelings, a state which is manifest today by many thousands of different denominations.

Meanwhile, in spite of recent difficulties, Catholics continue to confess one creed, and faithfully participate in the one, holy, universal and apostolic church of Jesus Christ. Why? St. Peter probably explained it best:  “And Simon Peter answered him: Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life.” (John 6:68)

We are called to love our Protestant brothers and sisters in Christ, with whom we one day hope to be united in Heaven. Until then, we probably shouldn’t waste too much time arguing over doctrinal differences, but instead, spend each day focused on loving one another.

We should also be eternally grateful that our Catholic Church contains the fullest possible measure of all God’s grace and truth.

Jola, you were wise in choosing this authentically Catholic website, “Ask Me About God” to answer your question.

In Christ’s Love,

Alice