When grace is not enough

by Doug Lawrence

I often receive emails and inquiries from good, prayerful, practicing Catholics who seem to have a hard time translating the graces they most certainly receive from God, into practical blessings.

My constant reply to people in this situation is to remember to pray first, for wisdom … since without sufficient wisdom, abundant graces often go unused and/or misapplied.

I also typically point out that God gives us graces, virtues, and other gifts because he loves us … but also for his own glory … so that his will might be done, on earth, as it is in heaven.

Which brings us right back to the critical importance of always remembering to pray for an increase in wisdom.

The epistle of St. James reads:

But if any of you want wisdom, let him ask of God who giveth to all men abundantly and upbraideth not. And it shall be given him. (James 1:5)

In other words … if you, as a faithful, practicing Catholic, need wisdom … fervently ask God to give it to you. He will never say no … he will never take offense … and he will grant it to you in supernatural abundance.

What could be simpler than that?

Common wisdom is no longer common

The early bird might get the worm, but it’s the SECOND mouse that typically gets to eat the cheese.

Submitted by Sharon F.

Words of Wisdom: The Paradox of Our Times.

There are taller buildings… but shorter tempers;
Wider freeways… but narrower viewpoints.
We spend more… but have less;
We buy more… but enjoy it less.
We have bigger houses… and smaller families;
More conveniences… but less time.
We have more degrees… but less sense;
More knowledge… but less judgment;
More experts… but more problems; More medicine… but less wellness.
We have multiplied our possessions… but reduced our values.
We talk too much, love too seldom… and hate too often.
We have learned how to make a living… but not a life.
We’ve added years to life… but not life to years.
We’ve been all the way to the moon and back…
But we have difficulty crossing the street to meet the neighbors.
We’ve conquered outer space… but not our inner space.
We’ve cleaned the air… but polluted the soul.
We have split the atom… but not our prejudice.
We have higher incomes… but lower morals.
We’ve become long on quantity… but short on quality.
These are the times of tall men… and short character;
Of steep profits… and shallow relationships.
These are times of world peace… but domestic warfare.
These are days of more leisure… but less fun;
Of more kinds of food… but less nutrition.
These are days of two incomes… but more divorce;
Of fancier houses… but broken homes.
We can choose to ignore these sad facts of life…
Or we can choose to make a difference.
Christ has no body on earth but ours,
He has no hands but our hands…
We have only one life, which soon will pass,
And those acts we perform for Christ
are the only that will last!
We must sacrifice ourselves for souls!
[ Author unknown]
Submitted by Bob Stanley

True compassion leads to understanding, repentance and (hopefully) forgiveness

GUEST COLUMN
Are You Compassionate?

September 2005By Abbot Joseph

Abbot Joseph, a monk for 22 years, has for the past five years been the Abbot of Holy Transfiguration Monastery in Redwood Valley, California, a Byzantine-rite monastery in the Ukrainian Catholic Church.

I have nothing but compassion for people who misuse the term “compassion.” This does not mean that I tolerate such misuse in the least, as you will see. One of the most beautiful divine qualities, in which we are invited to share — “Be compassionate as my Father is compassionate” (Lk. 6:36) — is all too often twisted into something that is tantamount to offering people a license to sin. “Compassion,” in modern parlance, means something like universal tolerance with a dose of sentimentality, which turns a blind eye to evil. In the Byzantine tradition, Christ is often called “The Lover of Mankind” and “The Compassionate One.” But He is never referred to as “The Tolerant One,” and with good reason.

Read the article

Submitted by Don H.

Some Words of Wisdom From A Good Priest

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A few links to the wise words and faithful teachings of Father Dwyer … from Bob Stanley … The Catholic Treasure Chest.

Father Dwyer on the Church

Father Dwyer on the Mass

Father Dwyer’s humor

Food for thought from Father Dwyer

Father Dwyer … speaking about the Blessed Virgin Mary

“Top 100 Sayings” of Fr. Luke Zimmer